Cases reported "Cicatrix"

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1/39. Camouflage in head and neck region--a non-invasive option for skin lesions.

    The technique of camouflage, a non-invasive procedure to correct flaws in the texture and colour of the facial skin, is presented. The acceptance and use of camouflaging by 52 patients with different diagnoses are presented. The advantages of camouflaging are discussed in comparison to medical tattooing.
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2/39. Cicatricial fibromatosis mimics metastatic medulloblastoma.

    Cicatricial fibromatoses usually occur in the anterior abdominal wall or in the extremities, but rarely in the scalp or the soft tissues of the neck. We report a case of desmoid fibromatosis that developed in a 15-year-old boy 8 months after surgery for cerebellar medulloblastoma.
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3/39. head and neck reconstruction using lateral thigh free flap: flap design.

    Eleven lateral thigh free flaps were used in head and neck reconstruction, transferred on the basis of the second perforator as well as the third perforator of the profunda femoris artery. The lateral thigh free flap was useful and reliable in head and neck reconstruction and was versatile in flap design. Due to the wide cutaneous territory of the lateral thigh flap, the skin island could be designed freely in the lateral thigh region. Careful patient selection is mandatory for good results. The pinch test and an understanding of the variety of subcutaneous thicknesses in the lateral thigh region are helpful in designing a skin island of adequate thickness. Other considerations in flap design are discussed.
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4/39. poems syndrome: cicatricial alopecia as an unusual cutaneous manifestation associated with an underlying plasmacytoma.

    poems syndrome is a rare condition with cutaneous manifestations commonly including angiomas, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and thickening of the skin. We describe a male patient with a 2-year history of cervical lymphadenopathy, erythematous thickening of the skin on the neck, and progressive walking difficulties. The patient had an occipital erythema with scarring alopecia and sparse follicular pustules at the edge of the lesion. Further investigation revealed symmetric polyneuropathy, hepatosplenomegaly, monoclonal gammopathy, subclinical thyreopathy, and an osteolytic bone lesion of the skull. Histologically, a plasmacytoma with lambda cell restriction was found. The overlying skin showed marked fibrosis, with loss of hair follicles, and a plasma cell infiltrate of polyclonal origin. The cervical lymph nodes showed histologic characteristics of multicentric Castleman's disease, and the skin of the neck showed thickening and vasoproliferation. There was no evidence of further plamacytomas. After excision of the plasmacytoma and postoperative irradiation, the symptoms gradually resolved within a few months. A cicatricial lesion remained on the occiput without further folliculitis or hair loss on the rest of the scalp. This case illustrates the reactive character of poems syndrome as a paraneoplastic syndrome in myeloma patients.
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5/39. Efficacy of lipectomy and liposuction in the treatment of multiple symmetric lipomatosis.

    BACKGROUND: Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is a rare disease characterized by enlarging, symmetric, nonencapsulated, fat deposits mainly on the neck and upper trunk. Liposuction and lipectomy, although palliative, are the treatments of choice, especially indicated when vital structures are compromised. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of liposuction and lipectomy in the treatment of MSL. methods: We have examined two patients diagnosed with MSL who presented with symptoms derived from the compression of vascular, nervous, and/or respiratory tract structures. One was treated with lipectomy and the other with liposuction. RESULTS: A rapid resolution of the clinical symptoms was achieved with both therapies. The patient who was treated with lipectomy suffered from a compression of the left brachial plexus by scar tissue as an adverse effect, requiring a second surgical procedure. Liposuction only provoked a mild autoinvolutive hematoma in the other case. No clinical recurrences were observed at 3 and 2 years of follow-up respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We consider both lipectomy and liposuction as safe and effective techniques for the treatment of MSL patients. Although liposuction is usually associated with less adverse effects than lipectomy, location of the lipomas must be carefully considered before choosing one technique over another.
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6/39. Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis within herpes zoster scars in a bone marrow recipient.

    Cutaneous lesions arising in herpes zoster (HZ) scars are rare. We report a 34-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia underwent allogenic bone marrow transplant (BMT). Ten days after the BMT, she developed clusters of vesicles over the right neck, scapula, shoulder and chest. She was treated with intravenous acyclovir and foscarnet. One month after the vesiculous episode of HZ she showed 5 mm to 2 cm clustered flat violaceous lichenoid papules and confluent plaques within the HZ scars. Histopathologic examination revealed a inflammatory infiltrate present in the papillary dermis with granulomatous aggregated formed by histiocytes, multinucleated giant cells and lymphocytes. She was treated with topic steroids with significant improvement. Pathologic findings are similar to those of an unusual lichenoid reaction named "giant cell lichenoid dermatitis". We present the first reported case of giant cell lichenoid dermatitis at the sites of HZ scars.
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7/39. granular cell tumor of the hypopharynx treated by endoscopic CO(2) laser excision: report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: granular cell tumor (GCT), or Abrikossoff's tumor, is an unusual lesion probably arising from schwann cells. It is frequently found in the head and neck region, where the tongue is the most commonly affected site. Involvement of the hypopharynx is exceedingly rare because, to the best of our knowledge, only four cases have been reported in the literature. methods: We describe hypopharyngeal GCT in two women aged 29 and 52 years, respectively. RESULTS: In the first patient, preoperative diagnostic examination, including endoscopy, CT, and MRI scan, was suggestive of a benign lesion arising from the posterior wall of the hypopharynx. In the second patient, a previous biopsy of the postcricoid area performed elsewhere suggested a diagnosis of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, and CT scan staged the lesion as T1 N0. In both cases, treatment included surgical excision under microlaryngoscopy with CO(2) laser. The histopathologic study of the specimens, supported by immunohistochemical techniques, determined the lesions to be a GCT. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patients were discharged 12 and 2 days after surgery, respectively. Both patients were asymptomatic without evidence of recurrence when last seen 2 years and 4 months after surgery, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: GCT should be included in the differential diagnosis of submucosal hypopharyngeal lesions. endoscopy and radiologic imaging do not display any typical finding suggestive of the diagnosis, which can be based only on histologic findings. Resection of the tumor, when technically feasible, should be performed under microlaryngoscopy with the CO(2) laser, which makes it possible to work in a bloodless field with minimal thermal damage and reduction of scarring and postoperative edema.
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keywords = neck
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8/39. Burn scar malignancies of the eyelids.

    PURPOSE: To study the clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of eyelid carcinomas developing in thermal burn scars. methods: A review of eight cases of eyelid burn scar malignancies: two from our own experience and six from published reports. RESULTS: Reported cases of burn scar malignancy of the eyelid are short-latency basal cell carcinomas. All carcinomas arose from small superficial burns. These potentially aggressive tumors respond well to local excision. CONCLUSION: As with other areas of the body, eyelid burn scars may undergo neoplastic degeneration. These carcinomas are predominately short latency basal cell carcinomas, rather than long-latency squamous cell carcinomas that are more common elsewhere in the body, including the head and neck region. Clinicians should be diligent in the long-term surveillance of all eyelid burns.
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keywords = neck
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9/39. Malignant melanoma in a burn scar.

    Cancers of various sorts are occasionally encountered in burn scars. These lesions are usually squamous cell carcinomas, and the burn scars are usually old. Very rarely, malignant melanoma is encountered. An 87-year-old nursing home patient who had been burned by a lightening strike at age 16 was evaluated. She had sustained a wound covering 2% or 3% of her body surface involving her neck and the upper portion of her anterior trunk that had required several grafts. A lesion was noted over the suprasternal notch approximately 3 months before admission. The biopsy was reported as malignant melanoma. She was subsequently treated by wide reexcision with an associated Z-plasty for neck release. Because of the patient's age and the presence of four areas of regional lymph nodes nearby into which metastasis might spread, no lymph node dissections were carried out. The specimen from the reexcision was reported as squamous cell carcinoma in situ, melanoma in situ, and multinucleated giant cell reaction, acute and chronic infiltrates. The wound margins were clear.
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keywords = neck
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10/39. Innovation and surgical techniques: endoscopic resection of cervical branchiogenic cysts.

    The recent advent of endoscopic procedures has compelled both plastic and neck and head surgeons to reconsider the conventional methods by which the excision of cervical congenital cystic is classically achieved.An endoscopic approach for excision of the cervical congenital cystic is described. This procedure is anatomically safe and can be made with minimal morbidity through a small transcervical incision.Both specific instruments and solid anatomical knowledge are necessary to perform a safe and efficient cystic endoscopic excision.The essential surgical steps are as follows: 1. Minimal incision placed in natural cervical wrinkle over the dome of the cyst; 2. Intracystic or extracystic dissection; 3. Identification and protection of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, spinal nerve, hypoglossi nerve, and posterior belly of digastric muscle; 4. Careful dissection of the posterior surface of the cyst, avoiding injury on the carotid vessels and internal jugular vein.Eight patients were operated on with this technique and they were very pleased with postoperative comfort and aesthetic results. Inconspicuous scars and no complications were registered.With advanced endoscopic instruments and the development of new surgical technique and surgeon experience, the endoscopic surgery can be the method of choice in cervical excision of branchiogenic cysts.
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