Cases reported "Cleft Palate"

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1/418. child with velocardiofacial syndrome and del (4)(q34.2): another critical region associated with a velocardiofacial syndrome-like phenotype.

    We report on a child with congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, pulmonic stenosis), submucosal cleft palate, hypernasal speech, learning difficulties, and right fifth finger anomaly manifestations, consistent with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS); however, cytogenetic analysis demonstrated a small terminal deletion of the segment 4q34.2 to 4qter. Fluorescent in situ hybridization did not identify a deletion of the critical region associated with VCFS. In previously reported 4q deletions with a breakpoint distal to 4q34.2, no cardiac defects or cleft of palate were reported. Our patient has a deletion of 4q34.2 to 4qter and has palate and cardiac involvement and minor learning difficulties, which implies that genes involved in heart and palate development lie distal to 4q34.2, and that the critical region for more severe mental retardation on 4q may reside proximal to 4q34.2. These results suggest that a distal 4q deletion can lead to a phenotype similar to VCFS and emphasizes the importance of searching for other karyotype abnormalities when a VCFS-like phenotype is present and a 22q deletion is not identified.
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ranking = 1
keywords = defect, congenita
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2/418. New case of the Richieri-Costa/Guion-Almeida syndrome.

    We describe a boy with multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome. He has growth retardation, microbrachycephaly, coloboma of the iris, and typical facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate. This phenotype overlaps with that described by Richieri-Costa and Guion-Almeida in three Brazilian brothers. The new patient provides further evidence of the existence of this rare clinical entity.
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ranking = 0.18386749919828
keywords = congenita
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3/418. Confirmation of Kapur-Toriello syndrome in an Italian patient.

    We report a patient showing the phenotype described by Kapur and Toriello (Am J Med Genet 41:423-425, 1991) in two sibs. Clinical manifestations include severe mental retardation, cleft lip/palate, and distinctive nose, eye, and intestinal defects. This additional case contributes to a better definition of the apparently new MCA/MR syndrome proposed by Kapur and Toriello.
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ranking = 0.27204416693391
keywords = defect
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4/418. Severe micrognathia, cleft palate, absent olfactory tract, and abnormal rib development: cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome or a new syndrome?

    We report on a family in which two sibs had apparently absent ribs and severe micrognathia on prenatal ultrasonography. The pregnancies were terminated at 19 and 12 weeks of gestation, respectively. autopsy findings in the first fetus (19 weeks of gestation) included severe micrognathia, a U-shaped defect of the soft palate, marked postnuchal edema, absent olfactory bulbs, and cribriform plate and rib abnormalities. The ribs consisted of cartilage anteriorly, with only a small amount of fibrous tissue present laterally and posteriorly. The second fetus (12 weeks gestation) had agnathia, with a large U-shaped defect in the soft palate. There was moderate postnuchal edema. The ribs were unossified and there were gaps in the cartilage where primitive mesenchyme was present posteriorly and laterally. These findings are consistent with a severe form of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. The early fetal histopathology of both cases suggests a possible mechanism by which the characteristic "rib gaps" of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome may develop, with evidence for abnormal function of a gene or genes involved in regulation of rib chondrogenesis.
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ranking = 0.54408833386781
keywords = defect
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5/418. Evidence that AEC syndrome and Bowen--Armstrong syndrome are variable expressions of the same disease.

    Several clinical disorders combine ectodermal dysplasia (ED) and cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). These conditions have been recognized as a group of diseases with a narrow phenotypic spectrum and multiple points of overlap. We report a patient with a clinical diagnosis of AEC syndrome (ankyloblepharon, ectodermal defects, and CL/P) who additionally has some features observed in a different ED-CL/P disorder, Bowen-Armstrong syndrome. Because of this clinical overlap, we suggest that AEC syndrome and Bowen-Armstrong syndrome may be variable manifestations of the same pathologic entity.
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ranking = 3189.3450316171
keywords = ectodermal dysplasia, ectodermal defect, defect
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6/418. Salivary gland aplasia with cleft lip and palate: a case report and review of the literature.

    We report the case of a patient with lifelong symptoms of xerostomia and a repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate. The clinical evaluation demonstrated aplasia of the major salivary glands. A review of the literature pertaining to salivary gland aplasia is presented, along with a summary of the data regarding patient gender, defect sites, hereditary background, and combined manifestations. The diagnostic methods, possible pathogenesis, and management are also discussed.
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ranking = 1.541160175021
keywords = defect, aplasia
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7/418. Working with parents to promote health.

    A cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, is the most common craniofacial malformation. The issue of whether health can be attained if the person has a physical defect is discussed. health education can be considered as a means whereby individuals learn to maintain, restore and promote health. Consideration is given to health promotion and the prevention of ill health in relation to infant feeding. Skill teaching, if successfully completed, may be regarded as a fundamental cornerstone to health promotion.
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ranking = 0.27204416693391
keywords = defect
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8/418. Multiple congenital anomalies syndrome: growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, preauricular skin tags, cleft palate, camptodactyly, and distal limb anomalies. Report on two unrelated Brazilian patients.

    We report on 2 unrelated Brazilian patients, born to non-consanguineous parents, both with multiple anomalies including growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, telecanthus, cleft palate, preauricular skin tags/pit, camptodactyly, and foot anomalies. To our knowledge, this is a previously undescribed formal genesis syndrome. Clinical and genetic aspects are discussed.
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ranking = 0.73546999679312
keywords = congenita
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9/418. Disorganisation: a case with popliteal pterygia and placental-skin appendages.

    We report a girl with congenital anomalies which include amniotic rings and scars, cleft lip and palate, thumb abnormalities, hexadactyly of feet, severe flexion deformities of legs and unusual finger-like appendages which were attached to the placenta. We suggest this patient represents another example of human homologue for the mouse mutant disorganisation (Ds).
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ranking = 0.18386749919828
keywords = congenita
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10/418. CATCH 22 syndrome: report of 7 infants with follow-up data and review of the recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11.

    CATCH 22 is a medical acronym for Cardiac defects, Abnormal facies, Thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia, and a variable deletion on chromosome 22. The deletion within the chromosome region of 22q11 may occur in patients with three well-described dysmorphologic cardiological syndromes: digeorge syndrome (DGS), velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CTAFS). We report in detail seven infants with a deletion of the locus 22q11 showing overlapping clinical features of DGS and CTAFS with complex congenital heart defects (double outlet right ventricle, atresia or stenosis of the pulmonary valve, atrial and ventricular septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of fallot, major aortopulmonary collateral arteries, arcus aortae dexter, and persistence of the left superior vena cava). A homograft was implanted between the right ventricle and the main stem of the pulmonary artery in 2 patients, while a balloon valvuloplastic of the pulmonary valve was performed in one patient only. Pulmonary hemorrhage, acute hypoxia, and aspergillus pneumonia were the complications. death occurred in three out of seven patients. Recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11 are described. Since the locus 22q11 is highly heterogeneous, the CATCH 22 acronym should be used and temporarily the old eponyms should be abandoned waiting for the identification of the different genes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = defect, congenita
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