Cases reported "Cleft Palate"

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1/36. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.
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2/36. Dentoalveolar growth inhibition induced by bone denudation on palates: a study of two isolated cleft palates with asymmetric scar tissue distribution.

    OBJECTIVE: This report presents two cases of isolated cleft palate with asymmetric distribution of postsurgical scar tissue determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. To determine the effect of mucoperiosteal denudation of the bone on maxillary alveolar growth, the analysis of dentoalveolar structures compared the affected side to the unaffected side of each case. METHOD: Two Japanese girls with isolated cleft palates were examined. Both subjects had undergone pushback operations (a modified version of the procedure of Wardill) for palatal repair at 18 months of age. Palatal blood flow was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry when the girls were 12 years old to determine the extent of postsurgical scar tissue over the denuded bone. To analyze the maxillary dentoalveolar structures three dimensionally, the whole surface of the upper dental cast was measured and recorded by an optical measuring device when the girls were 7 years old. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Analysis via flowmetry showed that the palatal scar tissue area was limited to the anterior tooth region on the right (unaffected) side but extended posteriorly to the premolar region on the left (affected) side in both subjects. The two girls had similar dentoalveolar structures, with the dental and alveolar arches deflected lingually at the deciduous molar area on the affected side. There were no differences in the buccolingual inclination of deciduous molars or in the vertical growth of the alveolar processes between the affected and unaffected sides. In both girls, bone denudation in the premolar region appeared to result in less than 3 mm of displacement of the teeth palatally, with no change in lingual inclination. Any effects of scar tissue on the vertical development of the alveolus were not substantiated.
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ranking = 2.5995425813933
keywords = tooth
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3/36. cleft lip and palate management with maxillary expansion and space opening for a single tooth implant.

    An adult Class I malocclusion with a unilateral cleft lip and palate is presented. The maxillary transverse deficiency was managed with orthopedic expansion and the missing lateral incisor with space opening, bone grafting, and single tooth implant. The mild maxillary retrognathia and deficient lip support was managed with dental compensation.
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ranking = 12.997712906967
keywords = tooth
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4/36. Reconstruction of an alveolar cleft for orthodontic tooth movement.

    Bone grafting to repair an alveolar cleft has long been an integral part of the treatment of persons with unilateral and bilateral clefts of the lip and alveolus. The presence of the cleft places a limitation on the orthodontist who would like to move teeth in the area of the cleft. Various grafting materials have been placed in alveolar clefts in an attempt to solve this problem. The case to be presented is a patient with a Class II, Division 2, malocclusion with a left unilateral alveolar cleft and a repaired cleft lip. Ten months after initiating orthodontic treatment, a free gingival graft procedure was performed because of insufficient vestibular depth and the narrow width of the keratinized attached gingiva at the left maxillary lateral and central incisor region. Two months after periodontal surgery, a mix of decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft and a granular bioactive glass graft material (1:1) were applied subperiostally on the buccal aspect of the edentulous cleft region. Six months later, the teeth adjacent to the grafted alveolar cleft were orthodontically moved into the edentulous area. The treatment results indicated that orthodontic, periodontal, and surgical interventions resulted in a successful closure of the alveolar cleft as well as improved periodontal conditions of the teeth adjacent to the cleft area. From the orthodontic point of view, tooth movement can be achieved successfully into a bone graft made of freeze-dried bone and bioactive glass.
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ranking = 12.997712906967
keywords = tooth
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5/36. Interdental distraction osteogenesis and rapid orthodontic tooth movement: a novel approach to approximate a wide alveolar cleft or bony defect.

    The closure of a wide alveolar cleft and fistula in cleft patients and the reconstruction of a maxillary dentoalveolar defect in traumatic patients are challenging for both orthodontists and surgeons. This is due to the difficulty in achieving complete closure by using local attached gingiva and the great volume of bone required for the graft. In this article, the authors propose using interdental distraction osteogenesis to create a segment of new alveolar bone and attached gingiva for the complete approximation of a wide alveolar cleft/fistula and the reconstruction of a maxillary dentoalveolar defect. They performed this procedure on one patient with a traumatic maxillary dentoalveolar defect and 10 patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lips and palates who had varied dentoalveolar clefts/fistulas. Interdental and maxillary osteotomies were performed on one side of the dental arch by the cleft or defect. After a latency period of 3 days, the osteotomized distal segment of the dental arch was then distracted and transported toward the cleft or defect by using a toothborne intraoral distraction device. The alveoli and gingivae on both ends of the cleft or defect were approximated after distraction osteogenesis. The need for extensive alveolar bone grafting was eliminated. A segment of new edentulous alveolus and attached gingiva was created interdentally at a site distant to the cleft or defect. In the cleft patients, teeth were moved orthodontically into the regenerate (newly formed alveolar bone) dental crowding 1 week after distraction. The orthodontic tooth movement was rapidly completed in 3 months, and the edentulous space was eliminated. Interdental distraction osteogenesis minimizes an alveolar cleft/fistula and helps reconstruct a maxillary dentoalveolar defect by approximating the native alveoli and gingivae; it also creates new alveolar bone and gingiva for rapid orthodontic tooth movement.
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ranking = 18.196798069753
keywords = tooth
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6/36. Secondary bone graft and eruption of the permanent canine in patients with alveolar clefts: literature review and case report.

    This paper emphasizes the important role that secondary bone grafting plays on the treatment of patients with alveolar clefts. The authors present a literature review and, based on panoramic radiographs, retrospectively and longitudinally analyze the behavior of permanent canines after completion of secondary bone grafting in 50 patients at the Hospital for rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of Sao Paulo, brazil. Twelve patients with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and 38 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 50) had undergone bone grafts to repair their residual alveolar clefts before the eruption of their permanent canines. These patients were observed over an average period of 3 years. In 94% of the sample (47 patients), the permanent canines presented intra-alveolar movement toward the oral cavity. In 72% of those 47 patients (36 patients), the permanent canines spontaneously erupted through the grafted area. In 6% of the 47 patients (3 patients), the permanent canines required orthodontic traction.
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ranking = 0.55555555555556
keywords = eruption
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7/36. Description of a clinical technique for tooth extraction in the cleft lip and palate area.

    cleft lip and palate are relatively common congenital malformations, which may require specialist paedodontic treatment. In this article, the case of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate is presented. He attended the Hospital for rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies (HRAC) for routine examination, during which the presence of pre-canine supernumeraries bilaterally in the cleft area was seen. The extraction of these dental elements was justified by extensive carious lesions and because they represented a potential problem during secondary palatoplasty. The precautions needed in tooth extraction in patients with cleft lip and palate are described, together with illustrations of the clinical procedure.
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ranking = 12.997712906967
keywords = tooth
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8/36. Intranasal tooth as a complication of cleft lip and alveolus in a four year old child: case report and literature review.

    Ectopic position of teeth is not rare. The presence of teeth have been reported in ovaries, testes, anterior mediastinum, and pre-sacral regions. In the maxillofacial region, teeth have been found in maxillary sinus, mandibular condyle, coronoid process, chin, nose, and even orbit. Approximately 50 cases of a tooth in the nasal cavity have been reported in literature. However, an intranasal tooth in cases of cleft lip and palate is comparatively rare. Intranasal teeth can cause problems such as nasal obstruction, chronic rhinorrhea and speech problems. Sometimes however, they are totally symptom-free. We present here an interesting case of an intranasal tooth in a four year-old-boy, who was operated on for cleft lip and alveolus at 6 months of age. The intranasal tooth did not cause any symptoms. The tooth was extracted under general anaesthesia when it was found to be very loosely attached to the nasal mucosa. The case is discussed in the light of relevant literature on intranasal teeth in cases of cleft lip and palate.
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ranking = 23.39588323254
keywords = tooth
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9/36. Analysis of the p63 gene in classical EEC syndrome, related syndromes, and non-syndromic orofacial clefts.

    EEC syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with the cardinal signs of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and orofacial clefts. EEC syndrome has been linked to chromosome 3q27 and heterozygous p63 mutations were detected in unrelated EEC families. In addition, homozygous p63 null mice exhibit craniofacial abnormalities, limb truncations, and absence of epidermal appendages, such as hair follicles and tooth primordia. In this study, we screened 39 syndromic patients, including four with EEC syndrome, five with syndromes closely related to EEC syndrome, and 30 with other syndromic orofacial clefts and/or limb anomalies. We identified heterozygous p63 mutations in three unrelated cases of EEC syndrome, two iowa white families and one sporadic case in a Filipino boy. One family is atypical for EEC and has features consistent with Hay-Wells syndrome. In this family, the mutation ablates a splice acceptor site and, in the other two, mutations produce amino acid substitutions, R280C and R304Q, which alter conserved dna binding sites. Germline mosaicism was detected in the founder of the mutation in one case. These three cases show significant interfamilial and intrafamilial variability in expressivity. We also screened p63 in 62 patients with non-syndromic orofacial clefts, identifying an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism but finding no evidence of mutations that would explain even a subset of non-syndromic orofacial clefts. This study supports a common role for p63 in classical EEC syndrome, both familial and sporadic, but not in other related or non-syndromic forms of orofacial clefts.
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ranking = 2.5995425813933
keywords = tooth
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10/36. Prosthodontic treatment of the edentulous adult cleft palate patient.

    Clefts of the upper lip and plate are relatively common, yet dental treatment of these patients is still very poor and many grow up suffering dental neglect. Dental practitioners should become involved in the treatment team as dental needs are present from birth to death. adult cleft patients often need tooth replacement with obturation of any residual clefts. They are best treated with tooth-supported removable appliances including partial and complete overdentures, thus preservation of their natural dentition is desirable. Edentulous cleft palate patients present with restorative difficulties due to their compromised maxillary arches as well as the presence of scar tissue in their palates and lips. An outline of these complications and guidelines for their treatment is illustrated in the form of three case reports from members of one family all presenting with varying cleft lip and palate defects. This article highlights the need for dental students to be exposed to dentally compromised patients so that they will feel confident enough to treat them in private practice.
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ranking = 5.1990851627866
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