Cases reported "Cleft Palate"

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1/16. child with velocardiofacial syndrome and del (4)(q34.2): another critical region associated with a velocardiofacial syndrome-like phenotype.

    We report on a child with congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, pulmonic stenosis), submucosal cleft palate, hypernasal speech, learning difficulties, and right fifth finger anomaly manifestations, consistent with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS); however, cytogenetic analysis demonstrated a small terminal deletion of the segment 4q34.2 to 4qter. Fluorescent in situ hybridization did not identify a deletion of the critical region associated with VCFS. In previously reported 4q deletions with a breakpoint distal to 4q34.2, no cardiac defects or cleft of palate were reported. Our patient has a deletion of 4q34.2 to 4qter and has palate and cardiac involvement and minor learning difficulties, which implies that genes involved in heart and palate development lie distal to 4q34.2, and that the critical region for more severe mental retardation on 4q may reside proximal to 4q34.2. These results suggest that a distal 4q deletion can lead to a phenotype similar to VCFS and emphasizes the importance of searching for other karyotype abnormalities when a VCFS-like phenotype is present and a 22q deletion is not identified.
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keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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2/16. Patient with a 22q11.2 deletion with no overlap of the minimal digeorge syndrome critical region (MDGCR).

    The apparent lack of genotype/phenotype correlation in patients with the DiGeorge anomaly and velocardiofacial syndrome (DGA/VCFS; the "22q11 deletion syndrome") indicates a complex genetic condition. Most cases, whatever the phenotype, have a 1.5-3 Mb chromosomal deletion that includes the minimal DiGeorge critical region (MDGCR). Another potential critical region on 22q11 has been suggested based on two patients with distal deletions outside the MDGCR. We report on a patient with a VCFS phenotype who has a deletion, mapped by short tandem repeat polymorphic loci and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, distal to and not overlapping the MDGCR. This patient is deleted for several genes, including the T-box 1 gene (TBX1; a transcription regulator expressed early in embryogenesis) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; involved in neurotransmitter metabolism). We discuss the role these two genes may play in the clinical phenotype of the patient.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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3/16. musculoskeletal abnormalities in velocardiofacial syndrome.

    This is the first case report detailing the musculoskeletal pathology and treatment ramifications associated with velocardiofacial syndrome. Orthopaedic manifestations include scoliosis, clubfoot, Sprengel's deformity, generalized ligamentous laxity that is especially problematic about the knee, and epiphyseal dysplasia that is most notable in the lateral humeral condyle, lateral femoral condyle, and femoral head.
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ranking = 0.55555555555556
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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4/16. CATCH 22 syndrome: report of 7 infants with follow-up data and review of the recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11.

    CATCH 22 is a medical acronym for Cardiac defects, Abnormal facies, Thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia, and a variable deletion on chromosome 22. The deletion within the chromosome region of 22q11 may occur in patients with three well-described dysmorphologic cardiological syndromes: digeorge syndrome (DGS), velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CTAFS). We report in detail seven infants with a deletion of the locus 22q11 showing overlapping clinical features of DGS and CTAFS with complex congenital heart defects (double outlet right ventricle, atresia or stenosis of the pulmonary valve, atrial and ventricular septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of fallot, major aortopulmonary collateral arteries, arcus aortae dexter, and persistence of the left superior vena cava). A homograft was implanted between the right ventricle and the main stem of the pulmonary artery in 2 patients, while a balloon valvuloplastic of the pulmonary valve was performed in one patient only. Pulmonary hemorrhage, acute hypoxia, and aspergillus pneumonia were the complications. death occurred in three out of seven patients. Recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11 are described. Since the locus 22q11 is highly heterogeneous, the CATCH 22 acronym should be used and temporarily the old eponyms should be abandoned waiting for the identification of the different genes.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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5/16. Velocardiofacial syndrome associated with atrophy of the shoulder girdle muscles and cervicomedullary narrowing.

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans. It is secondary to a chromosome 22q11 rearrangement and is characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects and learning disability. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl with a chromosome 22q11 deletion who, in addition to learning difficulties, hypernasal speech and mild dysmorphic features, had weakness and wasting of the shoulder girdle muscles but no cardiac involvement. brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed narrowing of the cervicomedullary junction. The clinical features of this patient with velocardiofacial syndrome further expand the spectrum of abnormalities associated with this condition.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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6/16. Benign idiopathic partial seizures in the velocardiofacial syndrome: report of two cases.

    We describe two children with the velocardiofacial syndrome and benign partial-onset seizures. Both presented with slight dysmorphic traits, mild to moderate mental delay, and high-arched palate. A cardiac defect was present in only one of them. In each patient, sporadic rolandic or occipital partial-onset seizures with the clinical and electroencephalographic features of benign idiopathic childhood epilepsy manifested at age 3 and 5 years, respectively. Treatment was started only in one patient, with complete seizure control. These two cases show that benign partial epilepsy can be a component manifestation of the central nervous system-related symptoms of the velocardiofacial syndrome.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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7/16. CATCH 22 Syndrome.

    CATCH 22 syndrome is characterized by cardiac defects, abnormal facial features, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia. It results from a deletion within chromosome 22q11. This syndrome is not a simple disease. It includes digeorge syndrome, conotruncal anomaly face syndrome, and velocardiofacial syndrome. The authors report two cases of CATCH 22 syndrome.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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8/16. Velocardiofacial syndrome in an unexplained XX male.

    We report the unusual finding of velocardiofacial syndrome (VCF) in an unexplained 46,XX male. A microdeletion of 22q11.2 was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Routine G-banded chromosome analysis revealed an XX sex chromosome constitution. FISH was performed using the SRY probe and failed to detect hybridization. The sex chromosome status of the patient was further investigated by PCR testing to screen for the presence of 24 distinct loci spanning the y chromosome. PCR screening failed to detect any apparent y chromosome material.
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ranking = 0.11111111111111
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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9/16. Specific language impairment in children with velocardiofacial syndrome: four case studies.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe specific language impairment in four children with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). DESIGN: A descriptive, retrospective study of four cases. SETTING: University Hospital Groningen, tertiary clinical care. patients: Of 350 patients with cleft plate, 18 children were diagnosed with VCFS. Four children are described. Interventions: In all children, cardiac and plastic surgery was carried out in the first year of life. Afterward, interventions consisted of hearing improvement, pharyngoplasty, and speech therapy. MAIN OUTCOME: Inadequate and uncharacteristic development of articulation and expressive language in four children with VCFS were observed. They differed from the majority in two ways: their nonverbal IQ was in the normal range, and their language skills were below expectations for their IQ. RESULTS: Four of 18 patients with VCFS (22%) showed poor response to therapy and did not develop language in accordance with their normal learning abilities (nonverbal learning capacities and language comprehension). Persistent hypernasal resonance and severe articulation problems remained in all four children. In two children the expressive language profile was also not in agreement with the nonverbal profile: they produced only two- and three-word utterances at the age of 6.0 and 5.3 years. The other two children at the age of 6.8 and 6.4 years produced very long sentences, but they were unintelligible. CONCLUSIONS: The speech and language impairment of the four children may be characterized as a phonological or verbal programming deficit syndrome and as such can be described as a specific language impairment in conjunction with VCFS.
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ranking = 0.55555555555556
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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10/16. Avoiding perils and pitfalls in velocardiofacial syndrome: an otolaryngologist's perspective.

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is classically characterized by clefting of the secondary palate, cardiac defects, learning disabilities, and facial dysmorphism. knowledge of this syndrome is of significant importance to otolaryngologists because a failure to recognize it prior to head and neck surgery can result in serious iatrogenic injury, including velopalatal insufficiency and damage to anomalous carotid arteries. To illustrate these issues, we describe the case of a 5-year-old boy with velocardiofacial syndrome. We also review the literature on velocardiofacial syndrome, which is not very extensive, perhaps because it is often difficult to recognize.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = velocardiofacial syndrome, velocardiofacial
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