Cases reported "Clubfoot"

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1/78. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the Antley-Bixler syndrome.

    The Antley-Bixler syndrome is a rare disorder with many musculoskeletal anomalies that demand orthopedic assessment. The syndrome includes skeletal, craniofacial, and urogenital anomalies. The most common skeletal deformities are radiohumeral synostosis, craniosynostosis, multiple joint contractures, and arachnodactyly. Other orthopedic manifestations that may occur are femoral bowing, ulnar bowing, camptodactyly, synostoses of carpal and tarsal bones, clubfoot, vertebral body anomalies, perinatal fractures, and advanced skeletal age. The inheritance pattern is thought to be autosomal recessive. A patient with this syndrome is described, which is the 18th of 24 reports published in the world literature. This case is compared with the other reported cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = contracture
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2/78. Characterization of a small supernumerary ring marker derived from chromosome 2 by forward and reverse chromosome painting.

    A small ring-shaped supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) was detected in 50% of metaphase cells in an 18-month-old boy with mental retardation and multiple congenital anomalies. Conventional cytogenetic methods had failed to identify the origin of the marker. When the patient was age 11.5 years, we defined the origin of the SMC by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a battery of centromere-specific dna probes. The marker was positive with the probe for locus D2Z. More detailed characterization was achieved by using chromosome 2 arm-specific and marker-specific DNA libraries, which were constructed by microdissection of the two arms chromosome 2 and SMC with subsequent amplification of the chromosomal material by a degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). The marker was identified as r(2)(p11.2-->q14.1). The propositus had dolichocephaly, coarse hair, low-set ears, exophthalmos, epicanthal folds, strabismus, depressed nasal bridge, high-arched palate, excess of skin on the neck, tapered fingers with mild clinodactyly, talipes varus on the right, inguinal hernia, hypogenitalism, muscular hypotonia, and mental retardation. This is the first case of SMC derived from chromosome 2 that was characterized by forward and reverse chromosome painting.
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ranking = 1495.379597985
keywords = talipes
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3/78. Down's syndrome presented with clubfoot deformity: a case report.

    A 1 month old girl was referred to the orthopaedic clinic with bilateral clubfoot deformities. At birth, clinical examination showed the typical characters of Down's syndrome and the diagnosis was confirmed by chromosome study. These two conditions appear improbable as their basic pathologies are entirely different. In our patient, the translocation type at the long arm of chromosome 21 was determined in the chromosome study. This result has never been reported in the literature.
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ranking = 21.489749946142
keywords = deformity
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4/78. A paradigm for the age-related treatment of knee dislocations in Larsen's syndrome.

    Three cases of Larsen's syndrome in siblings are presented to illustrate a paradigm for the age-related treatment of deformity. Each child presented at a different age, with differing degrees of deformity and growth disturbance. Both growth and remodeling potential influenced the choice of treatment and outcome. The surgeon who undertakes the correction or prevention of these deformities must face the problem of and, it is hoped, use, growth potential from open physes and the progressive loss of remodeling capacity with advancing age.
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ranking = 10.744874973071
keywords = deformity
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5/78. Congenital bowing of the long bones associated with camptodactyly, talipes equinovarus and agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    We report a baby with congenital bowing of the long bones, camptodactyly, talipes equinovarus and radiological features resembling both Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome and Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 2. The baby had, in addition, agenesis of the corpus callosum. This feature has not been reported in either of these syndromes. It is possible that this baby has a previously undescribed syndrome.
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ranking = 7476.8979899248
keywords = talipes
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6/78. A preliminary report of the use of botulinum toxin type A in infants with clubfoot: four case studies.

    This report describes the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in four infants with very severe clubfoot deformity. The gastrocnemius and posterior tibial muscles were injected with BTX-A after the patients reached a treatment plateau in physical therapy. Significant improvement in foot dorsiflexion and foot flexibility was seen in two patients, and surgery was not required. Surgical intervention was necessary in the remaining two patients, both of whom were ultimately diagnosed with a demyelinating neuropathy. The use of botulinum toxin as an adjunct to conservative care in infants with clubfoot is discussed.
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ranking = 5.3724374865354
keywords = deformity
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7/78. Case report: human neonatus with spina bifida, clubfoot, situs inversus totalis and cerebral deformities: sequence or accident?

    An unreported coincidence of malformations has been studied by anatomical dissection in a mature male fetus. Auxiliary, this fetus was examined by computed tomography and the skeletal malformations were three-dimensionally reconstructed. The organs of the thorax as well as of the abdomen showed a visceral inversion. In the lumbar region, a hyperkyphosis was detected in addition to a split-notochord. A hydrocephalus internus with enlarged lateral ventricles and an agenesis of the corpus callosum were apparent. The lower extremities were dystrophic with both showing a talipes equinovarus-deformation. Following the case report, we discuss if this is coincidental or manifestations in consequence of one defect.
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ranking = 1495.379597985
keywords = talipes
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8/78. Regional fasciocutaneous flap closure for clubfoot surgery.

    skin closure after a comprehensive posteromediallateral release of clubfeet through a Cincinnati incision may be difficult. This is especially true for cases of severe deformity either primary or recurrent. To deal with this, certain techniques have been developed. These consist of casting the foot in an undercorrected position with subsequent serial cast changes, leaving the incision completely or partially open for closure by secondary intention, using tissue expanders, and using different flap techniques. Five patients with nine clubfoot deformities who were treated with a comprehensive posteromedial-lateral release through a Cincinnati incision and underwent fasciocutaneous flap closure since June 1998 were included in this study. These flaps allowed correction and complete wound closure at the end of surgery without any skin tension. These flaps were constructed either in a rotational or V-Y advancement manner. None of the patients had any major complications. In summary, this new fasciocutaneous flap is a simple and reliable method in cases with primary skin-closure difficulties. It does not require special equipment or a plastic surgeon.
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ranking = 5.3724374865354
keywords = deformity
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9/78. magnetic resonance imaging study of the congenital clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method.

    Little information exists about the degree of efficacy of the several nonoperative treatments, such as manipulation and casting, used in correcting the pathology of the virgin clubfoot deformity. The steps in the correction of the displacements and anomalies of the skeletal components have never been visualized. The method reported to have the best long-term results is that of Ponseti. A magnetic resonance imaging protocol was devised to image the described chondroosseous abnormalities of the virgin clubfoot deformity and to illustrate the changes that occur with the Ponseti method of treatment. Scans were performed at the beginning of, in the middle of, and at the end of treatment. Images obtained with this protocol largely agree with postmortem studies of clubfeet. All of the major chondroosseous pathology could be visualized in vivo. With Ponseti treatment, all the abnormalities seen on the initial scans either improved markedly or corrected completely. Treatment resulted in correction not only of the abnormal relationships of the tarsal bones, but also of the abnormal shapes of the individual tarsal osteochondral anlages, probably because of the changes in growth resulting from the changes in mechanical loading of fast-growing tissues.
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ranking = 10.744874973071
keywords = deformity
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10/78. scoliosis in Gordon's syndrome.

    Gordon's syndrome is described as an autosomal dominant condition with the characteristics of short stature, a stiff spine, camptodactyly (89%), cleft palate (27%) and club feet (73%). The authors present a case report of a patient with this rare entity complicated by an unusual complex spinal deformity. There are no prior reports in the literature concerning operative or nonoperative management of deformity in this patient population. scoliosis in Gordon's syndrome shares the characteristics of an arthrogrypotic neuromuscular curve and demands extensive soft tissue release for optimal correction.
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ranking = 10.744874973071
keywords = deformity
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