Cases reported "Cochlear Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. The value of enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of endocochlear disease.

    BACKGROUND: gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GdMRI) is routinely used in the evaluation and management of suspected retrocochlear pathology such as vestibular schwannoma. However, its value in the evaluation and diagnosis of cochlear pathology associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has been less clear. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of case histories and imaging studies of patients with SNHL and cochlear enhancement on GdMRI diagnosed between 1998 and 2000. RESULTS: Five patients with SNHL who required gadolinium administration to establish the diagnosis of endocochlear disease were identified. Diagnosed lesions included an intralabyrinthine schwannoma, intracochlear hemorrhage, radiation-induced ischemic change, autoimmune labyrinthitis, and meningogenic labyrinthitis. In these illustrative cases, the GdMRI demonstrated intrinsic high signal or contrast enhancement within the cochlea and labyrinth in the absence of a retrocochlear mass. In one patient with meningogenic labyrinthitis, cochlear enhancement on MRI led to prompt cochlear implantation before the potential development of cochlear ossification. CONCLUSION: Our experience suggests that GdMRI plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of cochlear pathology associated with sensorineural hearing loss and may directly impact patient management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = labyrinthitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Recurrent acute otitis media associated meningitis in a patient with a contralateral cochlear implant and bilateral cochleovestibular dysplasia.

    OBJECTIVE: To illustrate that a patient with a cochlear implant may be at increased risk of meningitis secondary to developmental anatomic abnormality associated with the underlying sensorineural hearing loss, as opposed to the implant itself. methods: Case report. RESULTS: Our 12-year-old patient has bilateral cochlear dysplasia, profound sensorineural hearing loss and no prior history of recurrent acute otitis media or meningitis. He underwent a left cochlear implant at 8 years of age and subsequently experienced three episodes of right acute otitis media and meningitis over the next 4 years. Middle ear exploration revealed a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A right radical mastoidectomy with closure of the external auditory canal, removal of the tympanic membrane, malleus, and incus, closure of the eustachian tube, and obliteration of the mastoid and middle ear with abdominal fat has prevented further episodes. CONCLUSION: meningitis in a patient with a cochlear implant is not necessarily related to the implant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0028633896739693
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. temporal bone histopathology of a patient with a nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant.

    The temporal bone histopathology of a patient with profound sensorineural hearing loss attributable to cochlear otosclerosis is presented. The patient had a Nucleus 22-channel cochlear prosthesis implanted in the right ear prior to his demise. Unintentional scala media insertion of the electrode array resulted from labyrinthitis ossificans obliteration of the scala tympani. Inadvertent facial nerve stimulation necessitated program exclusion of electrodes 11 to 16 located in proximity to the labyrinthine and geniculate segments of the facial nerve. The patient received significant benefit from use of the device. The histopathologic findings are correlated with psychophysical and speech perception results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = labyrinthitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. fistula of the cochlear labyrinth in noncholesteatomatous chronic otitis media.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the clinical aspects and management of promontory fistula of the cochlear labyrinth. STUDY DESIGN: Case report and review of the literature. SETTING: University hospital, tertiary referral center. PATIENT, INTERVENTION, AND RESULTS: The authors describe an unusual case of cochlear fistula localized to the promontory discovered during tympanoplasty for noncholesteatomatous chronic otitis media in a 59-year-old woman. bone conduction was slightly impaired after operation and hearing improved after a revision myringoplasty performed for reperforation. CONCLUSION: Erosion of the bone of the labyrinth can also be observed in noncholesteatomatous otitis media. The presence of a fistula is not always associated with profound hearing loss. Overlying pathologic tissue can be removed without damaging the membranous labyrinth.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0028633896739693
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Multichannel cochlear implant and electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses in a child with labyrinthitis ossificans.

    Ossification of the cochlea following meningitis presents a surgical challenge. Electrode mapping, especially in the young child, is difficult given the uncertainty of electrode contact with viable neural elements. This paper reviews surgical technique and the use of auditory brainstem responses to map the electrodes. A 4-year-old child deafened by meningitis at age 20 months had bilateral cochlear ossification by computed tomography. At surgery, a canal wall-down mastoidectomy and closure of the ear canal were performed. A trough around the modiolus was drilled, and the electrode array was placed in it. Post-operatively, the patient gave aversive or no responses to electrode stimulation. To assess electrode function, auditory brainstem responses to individual electrode activation were obtained under general anesthesia. Functioning electrodes could thus be selected for mapping. The patient now responds well to sound.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = labyrinthitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Cochlear Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.