Cases reported "Coinfection"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. Is neuroborreliosis a medical emergency?

    Although lyme disease affects the nervous system in many ways (collectively known as neuroborreliosis), only rarely does it present as a medical emergency. In extreme cases, it may cause (1) encephalitis, (2) a rapidly progressive peripheral neuropathy, or (3) a painful truncal radiculopathy that may be confused with a severe visceral process. Knowing when to consider this spirochetosis in the differential diagnosis requires an understanding of its true clinical spectrum, and of an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. Acute abdomen by varicella zoster virus induced gastritis after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    We report on a 54-year-old male patient with an aggressive T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with abdominal manifestation undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation after high-dose chemotherapy in April 2003. About 4 months after transplantation, he developed severe upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound examination, X-ray, computed tomography of the abdomen and cardiac diagnostics could not explain the symptoms. While empiric therapy with high-dose acyclovir was started, we could document herpetic lesions in the gastric antrum by endoscopy. The epigastric pain rapidly decreased within several days after the start of acyclovir therapy. No herpetic skin lesions were observed at any time during the disease. This report demonstrates the importance of viral-induced gastritis in the differential diagnosis of severe abdominal pain in patients receiving autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 35.372641693475
keywords = varicella zoster, varicella, zoster
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. Streptococcal pyomyositis: case report and review.

    pyomyositis is most often associated with staphylococcus aureus infections after trauma. We describe an unusual presentation of pyomyositis of the chest wall secondary to group A betahemolytic streptococcus infection in a 15-month-old child with acute abdominal symptoms. In addition, the patient had no history or evidence of trauma to the affected area. pyomyositis presenting in this manner secondary to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection in the absence of a primary varicella infection has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1939611597909
keywords = varicella
(Clic here for more details about this article)



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.