Cases reported "Colitis, Ischemic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/14. Cecal necrosis: infrequent variant of ischemic colitis. Report of five cases.

    PURPOSE: Spontaneous nonocclusive ischemic colitis involving only the right colon is an infrequent occurrence. Because this problem is less recognized than its counterpart involving the left colon, the correct diagnosis may not be considered. The purpose of this article was to describe the presentation and management of this unusual clinical problem. methods: Five cases of nonocclusive ischemic cecal necrosis are described. Four of the patients presented with right-sided abdominal pain, tenderness, and leukocytosis. The preoperative diagnosis was incorrect in all patients, although cecal necrosis was considered in one. Two patients were thought to have. appendicitis, two were thought to have carcinoma, and one was thought to have a perforated viscus. Each patient underwent a right hemicolectomy and four survived. RESULTS: Each of the patients had ischemic cecal necrosis without evidence of emboli or vasculitis. Although cecal gangrene may occur after systemic hypotension, no such event preceded these patients' presentation. We believe that the patients we treated had a form of nonocclusive ischemic colitis, which occasionally affects only the right colon. CONCLUSION: Ischemic necrosis of the cecum is an infrequent variant of ischemic colitis that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the elderly patient presenting with right lower quadrant pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/14. Rare complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: two case reports.

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a diagnostic procedure with several known risks. We present two rarely reported complications of ERCP and sphincterotomy: transverse mesocolon disruption with ischemic colitis and splenic rupture. RESULTS: The first patient, a 54-year-old female, presented one day following ERCP and stent revision for pancreas divisum. She presented with hypotension and abdominal distention. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a ruptured spleen, which was confirmed on laparotomy. She had a complicated postoperative course and died of multiple organ failure. The second patient is a 56-year-old female who presented five days after ERCP and sphincterotomy with abdominal pain, abdominal wall ecchymosis, and decreasing hematocrit. Her evaluation included hospital admission and abdominal CT scan, which showed free fluid and a large hematoma in the transverse mesocolon. These findings were confirmed on laparotomy and a devascularized segment of bowel was resected. CONCLUSION: Only 6 cases of ERCP-related splenic injury have been reported in the literature. One additional report is available of a fatal splenic artery injury. No previous reports exist of a mesenteric hematoma resulting in bowel devascularization. Prompt evaluation and awareness of potential complications should help capture potentially life-threatening sequelae of ERCP.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/14. Ischemic colitis following translumbar thrombin injection for treatment of endoleak.

    Endoleaks remain a significant challenge after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Translumbar thrombin injection of the aneurysm sac has been used to treat endoleaks, with low reported morbidity. We present an unusual case of ischemic colitis following translumbar thrombin injection of an endoleak. A 67-year-old male with a 5.8-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was evaluated for endograft repair. The patient underwent preoperative embolization of the right hypogastric artery. The AAA was repaired using a unibody bifurcated graft (Ancure). Completion aortogram revealed no endoleak and a widely patent left hypogastric artery. Computed tomography (CT) at 2 months showed an endoleak appearing to originate from a lumbar artery near the proximal attachment site with outflow via the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). The endoleak was successfully treated with CT-guided translumbar injection of 8000 units of thrombin into the aneurysm sac. The patient subsequently developed chronic abdominal pain, diarrhea, and a weight loss of 20 lbs. colonoscopy revealed ischemic colitis of the rectosigmoid colon. Duplex evaluation indicated a patent superior mesenteric artery and IMA distal to its origin. Medical treatment failed and the patient underwent a low anterior resection 2 months later (4 months post-EVAR). Subsequently, the aneurysm has decreased to 5.4 cm, with no evidence of endoleak at 1 year. We conclude that ischemic colitis may occur following translumbar thrombin injection. thrombin embolization into the rectosigmoid arcade via the IMA was most likely the cause in this case. This problem can potentially be avoided by treating the IMA endoleak outflow prior to translumbar thrombin injection of the aneurysm sac. Thorough arteriographic evaluation of endoleaks should be performed prior to any interventions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/14. Overt ischemic colitis after endovascular repair of aortoiliac aneurysms.

    OBJECTIVE: Controversy exists as to the cause of ischemic colitis complicating endovascular aneurysm repair. Occlusion of the hypogastric arteries (HAs) during endovascular repair of aortoiliac aneurysms (AIAs) results in a significant incidence of buttock claudication, and has been suggested as a causative factor in the development of postprocedural colonic ischemia, in addition to factors such as systemic hypotension, embolization of atheromatous debris, and interruption of inferior mesenteric artery inflow. To analyze the relationship between perioperative HA occlusion and postoperative ischemic colitis, we reviewed our experience over 2 years with food and Drug Administration-approved endovascular graft devices for treatment of AIAs. methods: Elective repair of AIAs with bifurcated endovascular grafts was performed in 233 patients over a 2-year period. These included 184 AneuRx grafts, 17 Ancure grafts, and 32 Excluder grafts. During the experience, 44 patients (18.9%) underwent unilateral perioperative HA occlusion (28 right, 16 left) during the course of endovascular AIA repair, and 1 patient (0.4%) underwent bilateral HA occlusion. RESULTS: In 4 patients (1.7%) signs and symptoms of ischemic colitis developed 2.0 /- 1.4 days postoperatively. In all patients the diagnosis was confirmed at sigmoidoscopy, and initial treatment included bowel rest, hydration, and intravenous antibiotic agents. Three patients with bilateral patent HAs required colonic resection 14.7 /- 9.7 days after the initial diagnosis, and 2 of these 3 patients died in the postoperative period. Pathologic findings confirmed the presence of atheroemboli in the colonic vasculature in all 3 patients who underwent colonic resection. The fourth patient had undergone multiple manipulations of the left HA in an unsuccessful attempt to preserve patency of this vessel during AIA repair. This patient recovered completely with nonoperative management. Perioperative unilateral HA occlusion was not associated with a significantly higher incidence of postoperative ischemic colitis. CONCLUSION: Perioperative HA occlusion during aortoiliac open or endovascular surgery may contribute to development of the rare but potentially lethal complication of ischemic colitis. However, our extensive experience suggests that embolization of atheromatous debris to the HA tissue beds during endovascular manipulations, rather than proximal HA occlusion, is the primary cause of clinically significant ischemic colitis after endovascular aneurysm repair.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/14. Mycotic aortocoronary saphenous vein graft aneurysm presenting with unstable angina pectoris.

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of coronary bypass surgery 20 years prior who had a fever, chest pain, and a mediastinal mass develop after a complicated postoperative course of abdominal aortic aneurysm resection. A mycotic aneurysm of the saphenous vein graft to his left anterior descending coronary artery was diagnosed based on blood culture results and visualization of the aneurysm before resection. A summary of the saphenous vein graft aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm cause, diagnosis, and management is detailed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/14. cytomegalovirus ischemic colitis: a near-fatal presentation of hiv infection.

    cytomegalovirus infection occurs in immunocompromised patients. We present a 45-year-old male with no prior medical history who presented to the hospital with weight loss and non-bloody diarrhea. During hospitalization, he developed severe hematochezia and hypotension. colonoscopy revealed dusky, friable mucosa. The patient arrested and was resuscitated. Specimen from emergent colectomy showed ischemic changes secondary to cytomegalovirus infection of endothelium and small-vessel thrombosis. An hiv test was subsequently positive with CD4 count of 2 per microliter. The patient was treated with antiretroviral therapy and ganciclovir. He survived postoperative infections and was eventually discharged. In summary, this case of near-fatal cytomegalovirus colitis represents an unusual presentation of undiagnosed hiv infection. cytomegalovirus infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Hematochezia may be from intestinal ulceration or severe ischemic damage. Antiretroviral therapy and ganciclovir or foscarnet should be initiated promptly. Surgery is indicated in life-threatening hemorrhage or obvious bowel necrosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/14. Failure of conservative management after the passage of a distal colonic "cast": report of a case.

    PURPOSE: The spontaneous passage per rectum of a full-thickness colon "cast" is a rare consequence of acute colonic ischemia. Previous cases have undergone surgery soon afterward because of intractable symptoms. We report a patient who was managed conservatively for 11 months but ultimately required definitive surgery. methods: The clinical, radiographic, pathologic, and endoscopic findings were obtained from the case notes and compared with previously reported cases. RESULTS: A 67-year-old obese patient underwent a Hartmann's procedure for a perforated diverticular abscess, which was reversed six months later. On the first postoperative night after the reversal, she had a brief hypotensive episode, and three weeks later passed a 21-cm, full-thickness infarcted piece of colon. She did not develop peritonitis and for 11 months experienced only mild symptoms. Under colonoscopic surveillance, the granulation tissue conduit connecting the remaining viable bowel became increasingly stenosed proximally and difficult to dilate. After three rapidly consecutive episodes of large-bowel obstruction, she required a laparotomy to resect the stricture and restore bowel continuity. From a literature review, this is the eighth case of its kind and the first in which such prolonged conservative management has been possible. CONCLUSIONS: When symptoms permit, it is feasible to manage patients conservatively in the short-term after this unusual event to allow recovery from the initial insult and planning of future surgery. However, definitive treatment is surgical and colonoscopic management should not delay this once the patient is fit for surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/14. Resection of mesenteric inflammatory veno-occlusive disease causing ischemic colitis.

    Mesenteric inflammatory veno-occlusive disease (MIVOD) is a rare cause of mesenteric ischemia that is diagnosed by histologic examination of the operative specimen. recurrence of symptoms occurs, but further resection of ischemic intestine is seldom required. We describe the case of MIVOD in a young patient with clinical findings of ischemic colitis. The patient experienced complete resolution of the process, thus confirming the relatively benign course of this disease following resection. This report substantiates resolution of the inflammatory process after resection, colostomy, and reanastomosis. We review the literature and make conclusions regarding the clinical management of this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/14. Mesenteric venulitis in a 71-year-old man after acute appendicitis.

    Mesenteric inflammatory veno-occlusive disease (MIVOD) is a clinicopathological entity recently described for a case series of patients with intestinal ischemia of unknown etiology. MIVOD is characterized as a venulitis with lymphocytic, necrotizing, or mixed granulomatous morphology. The disease seems to be self-limiting with resolution of symptoms after surgical resection. We describe a 71-year-old man who developed focal intestinal ischemia in the postoperative period after laparoscopic appendectomy. At re-exploration, a 20-cm segment of grossly ischemic jejunum was identified and resected. The excised specimen demonstrated early ischemic mucosal injury and necrotizing mesenteric venulitis with thrombosis, consistent with verso-occlusive disease. The etiology of this rare vasculitis is currently unknown. We present our case report, which is followed by a review of the literature of MIVOD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient presenting with ischemic colitis.

    A 76-year-old man with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) initially presented with ischemic colitis, which was improved by conservative treatment. Preoperative assessment by computerized axial tomography scanning and aortography revealed an infrarenal type AAA with mural thrombus, stenoses of the right common iliac artery and the left internal iliac artery. The patient underwent aortoiliac bypass surgery with resection of the stenoses, and reconstruction of the left internal iliac artery. No complications including bowel ischemia, were noted postoperatively. This case emphasized the potential benefits of the extraperitoneal approach to the aorta, reconstruction of both internal iliac arteries, and use of prostaglandin E1.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Colitis, Ischemic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.