Cases reported "Colitis, Ulcerative"

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1/59. Central retinal vein occlusion during remission of ulcerative colitis.

    BACKGROUND: Retinal vascular disease is a rare complication of ulcerative colitis. CASE: We report a patient who developed unilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) (papillophlebitis) without any other retinal vascular disease during remission of ulcerative colitis. OBSERVATIONS: The best-corrected visual acuities were 1.5 OD and 0.7 OS. Dilated and tortuous retinal veins and retinal bleeding were seen in the left eye. macular edema and leakage from the papilla and the retinal veins of the left eye were evident on fluorescein angiography. After increased dosage of systemic prednisolone was prescribed, the retinal vascular changes resulting from CRVO (papillophlebitis) in the left eye gradually abated. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal vascular diseases should be monitored during both remission and activation of intestinal symptoms of ulcerative colitis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = vein
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2/59. A patient who survived total colonic type ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon, disseminated intravascular coagulation, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infection and bilateral femoral phlebothrombosis.

    We report a patient who survived total colonic type ulcerative colitis (UC) complicated by toxic megacolon (TM), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infection, and phlebothrombosis. A 69-year-old man was treated for about 4 months under the diagnosis of ischemic colitis at another hospital, and was transferred to our hospital. Based on endoscopic and pathological findings, we strongly suspected UC, and administered salazosulfapyridine and methylprednisolone, but TM and DIC developed, necessitating urgent subtotal colectomy. Despite his elderly age and the severe complications, he recovered and was discharged from our hospital about 4 months after admission. The mortality rate of UC complicated by TM and DIC in elderly patients is high, necessitating rapid initiation of high-dose steroid administration or surgical treatment.
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ranking = 156.21686936071
keywords = thrombosis
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3/59. budd-chiari syndrome complicating restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis: report of a case.

    PURPOSE: This is a case of hepatic vein thrombosis presenting in a delayed fashion after proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. Search for a causative thrombotic condition resulted in the diagnosis of polycythemia vera, a myeloproliferative disorder associated with hypercoagulability. The polycythemia was masked by an iron deficiency associated with the ulcerative colitis. methods: The history, physical, diagnostic modalities, and treatment for this patient are described, and the literature of budd-chiari syndrome associated with ulcerative colitis is reviewed. RESULTS: Six cases of budd-chiari syndrome in the setting of ulcerative colitis are reported in the literature from 1945 to 1997. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic vein thrombosis is a rare complication of ulcerative colitis. The diagnosis of budd-chiari syndrome demands a thorough search for a hematologic condition predisposing to thrombosis. Our patient had a myeloproliferative disorder, polycythemia vera, that is associated with a hypercoagulable state. The disorder was masked by an iron deficiency associated with the ulcerative colitis. Recognition of the entity will permit successful treatment.
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ranking = 98.991275771635
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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4/59. Ulcerative colitis with sagittal sinus thrombosis with normal coagulation profile.

    Thromboembolic events are serious complications in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. We describe a 30-year-old man with ulcerative colitis complicated by sagittal sinus thrombosis with normal coagulation profile; he achieved clinical remission with subcutaneous heparin.
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ranking = 156.21686936071
keywords = thrombosis
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5/59. Cerebral thrombosis and vasculitis: an uncommon complication of ulcerative colitis.

    Cerebral thrombotic disease is a rare and nearly always fatal complication of ulcerative colitis. It is associated with a necrotizing vasculitis. We report a fatal case with a confusing neurologic picture arising from this complication. autopsy revealed necrosis and hemorrhages affecting both cortical grey and white matter. Microscopic examination showed thrombosis of small and medium size vessels associated with hemorrhages and a necrotizing angiitis. Ulcerations, hemorrhages, pseudopolyps, and cryptic abscesses were found in the rectosigmoid region of the colon compatible with active ulcerative colitis. A sudden neurologic deficit in a patient with ulcerative colitis should direct attention to the consideration of a cerebral thrombotic event and the possibility of an associated cerebral vasculitis. diagnosis may be strongly suggested by MRI or arteriography, but it may require confirmation by biopsy of the brain parenchyma and leptomeninges. A hypercoagulable state has been associated with the thrombosis. Anticoagulation has yielded successful results in some patients with cerebral thrombosis but the risk of massive intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding preclude to establish clear indications. Neurologic improvement has been obtained with the use of steroids and cyclophosphamide.
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ranking = 218.703617105
keywords = thrombosis
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6/59. Haemorrhagic cerebral sinus thrombosis associated with ulcerative colitis: a case report of successful treatment by anticoagulant therapy.

    A 29-year-old man with ulcerative colitis was admitted to our hospital because of convulsions and a headache. Before admission, oral prednisolone had been administered due to his ulcerative colitis relapse. Computed tomography revealed a low-density area in the right frontal pole suggestive of a venous infarction. Once his headache and convulsions improved after the administration of an antiepileptic drug, he began to complain of right arm numbness and right hemianopsia again. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging angiograph showed extensive thrombosis in the superior sagittal sinus. We finally used the anticoagulant agents, heparin and urokinase, which eased his complaints and prevented the development of bloody stools. He was discharged with no neurological symptoms 25 days after admission. This is a rare case of sinus thrombosis complicated by ulcerative colitis, in which anticoagulant therapy was successful. magnetic resonance imaging angiography was useful for the diagnosis and for evaluating the therapeutic effect.
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ranking = 187.46024323286
keywords = thrombosis
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7/59. portal vein thrombosis successfully treated with a colectomy in active ulcerative colitis: report of a case.

    portal vein thrombosis is a rare complication in ulcerative colitis. We present a patient with portal vein thrombosis in ulcerative colitis who was successfully treated with colectomy. A 38-year-old Japanese female was admitted to our hospital because of an exacerbation of colitis. Abdominal ultrasonography performed because of liver dysfunction showed the thrombus in an umbilical portion of the portal vein. The patient underwent a subtotal colectomy and ileostomy because her colitis did not respond to intensive intravenous therapy. Although portal vein thrombus was treated with an intravenous infusion of urokinase before the operation, no change in the thrombus size was found. Approximately three months after the colectomy, the thrombus of the portal vein disappeared without anticoagulant therapy. Although a resection of an inflamed colon may be theoretically effective in the thrombosis in the inflammatory bowel disease, its benefit has not been confirmed. Our case suggests that the resection of the diseased bowel may have a favorable effect on the course of portal vein thrombosis in acute attacks of ulcerative colitis.
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ranking = 268.78960194894
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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8/59. Aortic thrombosis and ulcerative colitis.

    Arterial thrombotic accidents in the course of inflammatory bowel disease are rare. They generally affect young adults whose disease is active. We observed a case of aortic and renal arterial thrombosis in a 40-year-old woman who was suffering from ulcerative colitis. Surgical thrombectomy ensured good postoperative results, without any ischemic or renal sequelae. Six days later the patient presented with distal thrombosis of the splenic artery, which receded under anticoagulant treatment. The physiopathology of thromboembolic events in the course of inflammatory bowel disease is uncertain. Such events result from a state of hypercoagulability of various mechanisms, which can be observed in active inflammatory bowel disease. This possibility of serious arterial thrombosis argues in favor of long-term anticoagulant treatment when inflammatory bowel disease is active.
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ranking = 218.703617105
keywords = thrombosis
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9/59. Excision of an invasive thymoma: a cure for ulcerative colitis?

    thymoma is often associated with other diseases, including autoimmune diseases and endocrine disorders. Ulcerative colitis is a nonspecific inflammatory disease and is thought to be an immune-mediated disorder; however, coincidence of thymoma and ulcerative colitis is rare. We treated a 51-year-old woman with invasive thymoma and ulcerative colitis. After excision of the invasive thymoma with partial resections of pericardium, left lung, brachiocephalic vein, and left phrenic nerve, the ulcerative colitis was cured.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = vein
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10/59. Acute budd-chiari syndrome, portal and splenic vein thrombosis in a patient with ulcerative colitis associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and protein c deficiency.

    We report the case of a female patient who had severe thrombotic complications in peripheral (V. jugularis, subclavia, brachialis, poplitea) and visceral (portal and splenic) veins 4 years after the first diagnosis of severe ulcerative pancolitis. A thrombolysis therapy for subclavian and jugular vein thrombosis was performed without complication, but she soon developed acute thrombosis of the hepatic veins (acute budd-chiari syndrome). She quickly recovered after liver transplantation and now - 6 years later - she lives a normal life with continuous anticoagulation and medical therapy of the colitis.3 possible causes for the severe coagulation defect in this patient can be supposed: thrombocytosis, protein c deficiency and an antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.
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ranking = 200.89884290659
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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