Cases reported "Colorectal Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/4. Colorectal adenocarcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm following rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.

    Following improvements in therapy for childhood malignancies, the striking increase in survival rate over the past 30 years has led to the increase risk of developing second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We report a case of colorectal carcinoma as a SMN, following treatment for rhabdomyosarcoma. The patient was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder at his age of three years, and developed adenocarcinoma in the colon 13 years later. Histologic examination of the surgical specimen revealed adenocarcinoma involving the rectosigmoid area with radiation colitis in its background. The tumor cells showed strong immunoreactivity for p53 protein, suggesting the role of irradiation and p53 mutation in carcinogenesis. This case emphasizes the need for dose observation in survivors of early childhood malignancies treated with radiation and multiagent chemotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/4. Metachronous breast carcinoma (second malignancy), following "cure" from colorectal carcinoma.

    Metachronous or synchronous breast carcinoma following or co-existing with colorectal carcinoma are well recognised clinicopathological entities, and the risk of developing both possibly underlines the similarities in carcinogenesis pathways for these carcinomas. We present a 60-year-old housewife with a history of a treated primary colon carcinoma (Duke's C) 15 years previously. Six months ago, during the follow-up care a small sub-areolar lesion was determined in a mammogram. A lumpectomy was performed under local anaesthesia, which revealed an infiltrating ductal carcinoma (6 mm in greatest diameter). Immuno-histochemical assays for oestrogen and progesterone receptors and c-erb B2 ongoprotein were performed. Axillary lymphadenectomy showed 1/11 positive node. She received adjuvant radiotherapy and hormone manipulation. To date, seven months later she is disease free. The aim of this report is to emphasise the risk of metachronous second malignancy of breast or colorectal carcinoma following colorectal carcinomas. A second primary colonic malignancy following breast primary carcinoma is more frequent than inverse clinical form.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/4. Large bowel adenomas.

    The last 20 years have witnessed dramatic technological advances in the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal polyps. These developments, in addition to an increased understanding of large bowel carcinogenesis, have shifted the risk/benefit balance toward a more aggressive approach to colorectal polyps. Mounting evidence for the adenoma-carcinoma sequence supports the position that all colorectal polyps should be removed, recovered, and evaluated. Moreover, in most cases polypectomy can be achieved endoscopically. To justify surgery today, adenomas must be too large to be removed endoscopically, located in the distal rectum, or malignant with submucosal invasion or questionable margins.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/4. Colorectal adenocarcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm following Wilms' tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common primary malignancies in adults and occurs in older patients after pelvic radiation. It is rare in children and young adults. We report two cases of colonic adenocarcinoma which were second malignant neoplasms following treatment for early childhood malignancies. One child had Wilms' tumor at 9 months of age treated with preoperative radiation and surgery. He developed radiation colitis and multifocal intestinal adenocarcinomas 42 years later and died with abdominal carcinomatosis. The second child had retroperitoneal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma at age 1 year and was treated with preoperative radiation, surgery, and chemotherapy. At age 2 years he had radiation colitis; at age 11 years he had rectal adenocarcinoma associated with adenomatous polyps, focal adenomatous change and radiation colitis. Immunohistochemical studies revealed p53 positivity in both adenocarcinomas and in adenomas from the second patient, suggesting that p53 mutation was involved in carcinogenesis. The history of high-dose radiation in early childhood and the multifocal lesions suggest the adenocarcinomas in both patients were second malignant neoplasms, with associated reactive and benign neoplastic and premalignant lesions well documented in one case. These two cases document the phenomenon of early onset of adult type tumors in survivors of childhood cancer and emphasize the need for continued clinical evaluation of patients at risk for second malignant neoplasms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Colorectal Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.