Cases reported "Communication Disorders"

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21/35. The role of music therapy in an interdisciplinary approach to address functional communication in complex neuro-communication disorders: a case report.

    PURPOSE: This paper presents a case report of collaborative work between speech and language therapy (SLT) and music therapy (MT) in the case of an individual presenting with complex communication difficulties and lability caused by pseudo-Parkinsonian vascular disease. DESIGN: MT intervention was used to investigate whether participation could be enabled in a client presenting with complex problems as well as facilitate change in communication parameters which remained unresponsive to conventional SLT intervention. A single case design measured communication and well-being parameters using pre-, during and post-intervention measures. In addition, analysis of the client's musical responses was undertaken to examine changes in vocal functioning which are involved in communication. RESULTS: Analysis of the client's performance during MT intervention revealed improvements in prosody and phonation, with positive reports of participation, reduced incidence of lability and improvements in measures of well-being. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the value of such collaborative working in addition to making recommendations for the modification of existing treatment protocols. The findings highlight that fatigue is a major consideration when working with people with severe and complex clinical presentations.
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keywords = communication
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22/35. nasal obstruction and human communication.

    nasal obstruction may cause a variety of communication disorders, particularly in children. The effects of nasal obstruction on hearing, speech, language, and voice are examined. methods for assessing the effects of nasal obstruction are delineated, and recommendations for therapeutic interventions are described.
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ranking = 0.41666666666667
keywords = communication
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23/35. reading epilepsy.

    This is a report of a 21-year-old woman with reading epilepsy. Clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) observations are presented while the patient read a news magazine in Spanish, read a magazine in English, read an announcement repetitively, viewed comic strips without legends, made a mathematical calculation. Only reading in Spanish produced clinical and EEG paroxysms. This case report supports the "communication" hypothesis as opposed to hypotheses that emphasize proprioceptive and other "lower order" stimuli in evoking seizures while reading.
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ranking = 0.083333333333333
keywords = communication
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24/35. Managing the language and learning needs of the communication-impaired preschool child. A proactive approach.

    If a proactive approach to assessment and intervention had been used in the case study presented at the beginning of this article, the following might have occurred: The SLP would have asked the parents and brother of the 3 1/2-year-old child referred for a communication evaluation to participate in the assessment activities. The parents would have been asked to prioritize their expectations for their daughter's communication, behavior, and school success. They would have been told the SLP would do the same based on her knowledge of performance expectations in these areas for a 3 1/2-year old. Both the parents and the SLP would have agreed to consider describing the child's communication, behavior, and potential for school success in more than a single setting or context. The child would have been seen in her home as well as in a preschool setting. The clinician would have observed the child's play with both familiar and unfamiliar children and adults. The parents would have kept a log of their child's communication successes and failures for one week. The clinician would have used those situations the parents identified as successful and unsuccessful to specify the child's strengths and weaknesses. The parents would have been asked to write down ideas they had on the type of intervention, if any, they felt their daughter needed to meet the expectations they set. The clinician would do the same and would have consulted with an educational specialist and a psychologist to obtain their perspective on the educational and cognitive needs of a preschooler. The speech-language pathologist would have asked other professionals to assist in assessment of this child. The psychologist would have completed some testing in the home with the SLP providing help in interpreting the child's responses. The educational specialist would have invited the SLP to observe the child in a diagnostic preschool setting to assess the child's ability to understand and communicate in an unfamiliar environment with peers. The team, including the parents, the SLP, psychologist, and educational specialist would have met to share the information they had gathered about the child's communication, behavior, and potential for success in school. The SLP would have acted as a case manager and listed the strengths and weaknesses each participant identified for the child. When the list was complete, the SLP would have presented consistent areas of strength and weakness reported across contexts. The team members would have developed statements of their performance expectations for the child.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = communication
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25/35. Communicative disorders. The first year of life.

    Disorders of communication have high incidence and prevalence in the fetus, neonate, and infant, and optimal care is dependent on early recognition and intervention. This article reviews receptive disorders, expressive disorders, and their diagnoses.
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ranking = 0.083333333333333
keywords = communication
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26/35. Clinical and communication access through amplification for a medical student with severe hearing loss: case report.

    This case report focuses on the communication difficulties of a 21-year-old medical student with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. The greatest difficulties reported by the patient were for stethoscope use and slide presentations in darkened rooms. Successful audiologic management was accomplished for this patient via use of a behind-the-ear (BTE) FM system for classroom use and a "homemade" amplified stethoscope that enabled him to hear diagnostic heart sounds for clinical use. The amplified stethoscope provided greater low-frequency gain for this patient than was available through other commercial units.
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ranking = 0.41666666666667
keywords = communication
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27/35. A videotape analysis procedure for assessing conversational fluency in hearing-impaired adults.

    This article describes a method for analyzing conversational difficulties and communication breakdown management in hearing-impaired adults and their communicative partners. The focus of the analysis is placed on the examination of conversational floor control, the proportion of repaired and nonrepaired communication breakdowns, and the strategies used by each member of the dyad to repair breakdowns. A case study illustrating the application of the procedure for aural rehabilitation is presented.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = communication
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28/35. Childhood sexual abuse reported by facilitated communication.

    Facilitated communication remains an unproven and controversial strategy for nonspeaking children with developmental disabilities. It is possible that the process may be influenced by the facilitator. The evaluation of alleged sexual abuse reported by FC must include a full psychosocial history, complete physical examination for evidence of abuse, and the assessment of the child's communicative competence. The demonstration of communicative competence requires a strategy similar to that utilized with Carla. The successful documentation of the child's communication of general information should precede the pursuit of specific abuse issues.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
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29/35. Assessment of pragmatic communication skills in adolescents after traumatic brain injury.

    Deficits in pragmatic communication ability have a significant impact on functional outcome from traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly during adolescence, when sophisticated social communication skills are developing. There are few published tests designed to assess pragmatic skills in this age group. In the present study, four tasks designed to tap various aspects of pragmatic communication ability were administered to three brain-injured adolescents and 36 of their uninjured peers aged 15-18 years. The tasks evaluated the ability to negotiate, hint, describe a simple procedure, and understand sarcasm. The four tasks were found to tap distinct aspects of pragmatic ability in control subjects. Further, within the control group, task performance was related more to non-verbal reasoning ability than vocabulary skills. Scores for two of the three TBI subjects were poorer than those of their peers, while a third mildly injured subject performed within normal limits. Pragmatic task scores were consistent with the results of neuropsychological testing in the three TBI subjects. Implications for clinical management and recommendations for future research are discussed.
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ranking = 0.58333333333333
keywords = communication
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30/35. A case study: follow-up assessment of facilitated communication.

    A 6-month follow-up of an individual reported to engage in validated facilitated communication (FC) is presented. Three main issues are addressed: the current status of the individual's FC use, the effect of food reinforcers on his communicative ability, and a comparison of FC to the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). Results indicated that the individual did not engage in any validated FC, that performance was equivalent on food and nonfood trials, and that PECS was the preferred mode of communication, yielding 100% accuracy in a message-passing, object identification task. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of an individual's right to communicate by objectively validated methods.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = communication
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