Cases reported "Constriction, Pathologic"

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1/145. Venous gas embolism during endoscopy.

    Venous gas embolism is a rare but serious complication of laparoscopic and endoscopic procedures. We describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with a strictured hepaticojejunostomy anastomosis who was treated with transabdominal endoscopic balloon dilation. During the procedure, she suffered a venous gas embolus with immediate cardiovascular collapse. After treatment with pressors, electrical cardioversion, and multiple aspirations of the right ventricle, the patient recovered fully. We reviewed all reported cases of venous gas embolism during endoscopy over the past 30 years and identified multiple risk factors. We suggest precautions to minimize future complications in patients at increased risk.
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keywords = ventricle
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2/145. Post-Mustard procedure pulmonary venous obstruction: An opportunity for anatomic correction with a one-stage arterial switch.

    A 14-year-old boy after a Mustard procedure for transposition of the great arteries developed pulmonary hypertension secondary to baffle obstruction. This occurred over several years without apparent significant symptomatology. Systemic-level pressure prevailed in the left (pulmonary) ventricle and provided an opportunity to perform a successful one-stage arterial switch.
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keywords = ventricle
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3/145. blindness from bad bones.

    Progressive visual loss is the most common neurologic finding in osteopetrosis. Several mechanisms may explain this phenomenon, including compression of the optic nerves caused by bony overgrowth of the optic canals and retinal degeneration. We report a child with osteopetrosis and progressive visual loss, even though patent optic canals were demonstrated by computed tomography and digital holography. This patient's visual loss was caused by increased intracranial pressure secondary, to obstruction of cerebral venous outflow at the jugular foramen. This case points to the importance of a full evaluation of the skull base foramina in the diagnostic workup of visual loss in patients with osteopetrosis.
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ranking = 2.6949744693019
keywords = cerebral, foramen
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4/145. Rapid two-stage repair of S,L,L, ventricular septal defect, pulmonary atresia, ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve, and stenotic pulmonary arteries.

    The repair of a corrected transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and pulmonary atresia is presented. An ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve, dextrocardia, and severe distortion of the pulmonary arteries complicated the surgical procedure, which was performed in two stages. Reconstruction of the pulmonary arteries and a bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis were performed first; Rastelli and hemi-Mustard procedures completed the correction. The rationale and the possible indications of this "one and a half ventricle" repair are discussed.
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keywords = ventricle
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5/145. Reversible platypnoea and orthodeoxia after surgical removal of an hydatid cyst from the liver.

    A patient with a large hydatid cyst of the liver developed a positionally symptomatic right to left shunting across a patent foramen ovale with both platypnoea and orthodeoxia, despite normal pulmonary arterial pressures and normal pulmonary function tests. When the patient was in the supine position the calculated right to left shunt was 15.1% and 29.5% when seated. The shunt was attributed to the compression of the right atrium and ventricle by the cyst. Surgical evacuation of the cyst relieved the symptoms and the positionally induced shunting.
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ranking = 2.184161571874
keywords = foramen, ventricle
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6/145. Cerebral vasculopathy secondary to leptomeningeal gliomatosis: angiography.

    We describe a young woman with a glioblastoma multiforme in whom angiography showed multiple intracranial stenoses. The resected tumour was found to be invading cerebral vessels.
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ranking = 1.5108128974279
keywords = cerebral
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7/145. angioplasty and stenting of solitary supra-aortic artery and aortoplasty by kissing balloon technique.

    A child presented with symptoms of compromise to cerebral blood flow and cardiac failure. On diagnostic angiography, he was found to have a discrete coarctation and related ostial stenosis of the left subclavian artery, which acted as the sole source of cerebral blood flow. The subclavian lesion was initially dilated with a 6 mm x 50 mm balloon. The discrete coarctation was then dilated with an 8 mm x 50 mm balloon. Since significant residual stenosis was present at the subclavian origin, it was stented with a 20 mm Palmaz-Schatz stent (Cordis Corporation, Miami lakes, florida). Since the coarcted segment required further dilatations, the kissing balloon technique was used, wherein the 6 mm balloon was placed extending from the left subclavian lesion distally to the related aortic lesion proximally, along with another 10 mm balloon in the aorta. The end result was acceptable and the patient's symptoms improved significantly after the procedure.
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ranking = 3.0216257948557
keywords = cerebral
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8/145. Transcranial bypass for spontaneous intracranial carotid artery dissection--a case report.

    A case of spontaneous intracranial artery dissection (IAD) of the anterior circulation is reported. A 32-year-old man developed left hemiparesis with headache. Angiographies (AGs) showed progressive occlusion of the distal end of the right internal carotid artery. He underwent a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis 20 days after his initial symptoms. He improved gradually after operation. The prognosis and treatment of IAD are discussed. The authors conclude that cases with IADs of the anterior circulation should be followed up by cerebral AG or magnetic resonance angiography and that early bypass surgery should be considered to prevent massive cerebral infarction in some cases.
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ranking = 4.5324386922836
keywords = cerebral
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9/145. myocardial ischemia due to vascular systemic amyloidosis: a quantitative analysis of autopsy findings on stenosis of the intramural coronary arteries.

    A case is reported of a 65 year old man who suffered myocardial ischemia resulting from extensive stenosis of the intramural coronary arteries secondary to systemic vascular involvement by primary amyloidosis. In the myocardium, there were multiple fibrotic foci scattered mainly in the subendocardial region of the ventricle. Intramural coronary arteries were stenotic or occlusive due to amyloid-induced luminal narrowing, but there was no significant stenosis of the epicardial coronary arteries. Quantitative analysis of amyloid deposits in the intramural coronary arteries demonstrated that occlusive arteries were predominant in the surrounding area of myocardial fibrosis, and the extent of coronary stenosis by amyloid deposition was significantly more severe than in hearts of the five control patients who had coronary amyloidosis without myocardial fibrosis. These results indicate that myocardial fibrosis originates from coronary ischemia due to vascular amyloid deposition. This is the first time that the relationship between myocardial lesions and coronary amyloid deposition has been elucidated using histopathologic quantitative analysis.
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keywords = ventricle
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10/145. Unilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis in an adult with Down's syndrome--case report.

    A 29-year-old male with Down's syndrome presented with severe headache and vomiting. Computed tomography demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Left carotid angiography showed severe stenosis of the middle cerebral artery 2 cm distal to its origin, as well as abnormal hyper-vascularization near the stenosis site similar to that seen in moyamoya disease. Right carotid angiography showed no abnormalities. However, slight stenosis of the distal part of the bilateral vertebral arteries was noted. There was no aneurysm. We judged that the subarachnoid hemorrhage had been caused by rupture of the moyamoya-like vessel. Some patients with Down's syndrome have anatomical vascular abnormality and vascular fragility. The cerebral vascular abnormality found in this case may be part of the systemic vascular abnormalities associated with Down's syndrome. The vascular changes in some adult patients with Down's syndrome may be a sign of premature aging, and long-term studies with periodic vascular examination of patients with Down's syndrome need to be performed.
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ranking = 9.0648773845672
keywords = cerebral
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