Cases reported "Contracture"

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1/62. Treatment of a neck burn contracture with a super-thin occipito-cervico-dorsal flap: a case report.

    Postburn neck contractures still represent a surgical challenge due to their exposed location; and early operative treatment is necessary for both functional as well as aesthetic reasons. An excellent functional result was obtained by using a supercharged super-thin occipito-cervico-dorsal flap described by Hyakusoku to repair a large defect of the anterior neck following a very wide neck burn contracture release. In this case report, the technique and its advantages among the other reconstructive modalities are discussed briefly.
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keywords = neck
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2/62. head and neck reconstruction using lateral thigh free flap: flap design.

    Eleven lateral thigh free flaps were used in head and neck reconstruction, transferred on the basis of the second perforator as well as the third perforator of the profunda femoris artery. The lateral thigh free flap was useful and reliable in head and neck reconstruction and was versatile in flap design. Due to the wide cutaneous territory of the lateral thigh flap, the skin island could be designed freely in the lateral thigh region. Careful patient selection is mandatory for good results. The pinch test and an understanding of the variety of subcutaneous thicknesses in the lateral thigh region are helpful in designing a skin island of adequate thickness. Other considerations in flap design are discussed.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = neck
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3/62. Case report of malocclusion with abnormal head posture and TMJ symptoms.

    Abnormal cervical muscle function can cause abnormal head posture, adversely affecting the development and morphology of the cervical spine and maxillofacial skeleton, which in turn leads to facial asymmetry and occlusal abnormality. There can be morphologic abnormalities of the mandibular fossa, condyle, ramus, and disk accompanying the imbalance of the cervical and masticatory muscles activities. Two normally growing Japanese female patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion presented with TMJ symptoms and poor head posture as a result of abnormal sternocleidomastoid and trapezius cervical muscle activities. One patient underwent tenotomy of the two heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the other patient did not. In addition to orthodontics, the 2 patients received physiotherapy of the cervical muscles during treatment. Both were treated with a functional appliance as a first step, followed by full multi-bracketed treatment to establish a stable form of occlusion and to improve facial esthetics with no head gear. This interdisciplinary treatment approach resulted in normalization of stomatognathic function, elimination of TMJ symptoms, and improvement of facial esthetics. In the growing patients, the significant response of the fossa, condyle, and ramus on the affected side during and after occlusal correction contributed to the improvement of cervical muscle activity. Based on the result, early occlusal improvement, combined with orthopedic surgery of the neck muscles or physiotherapy to achieve muscular balance of the neck and masticatory muscles, was found to be effective. Two patients illustrate the potential for promoting symmetric formation of the TMJ structures and normal jaw function, with favorable effects on posttreatment growth of the entire maxillofacial skeleton.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = neck
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4/62. Microsurgical combined scapular/parascapular flap for reconstruction of severe neck contracture: case report and literature review.

    OBJECTIVE: The reconstruction for severe neck contracture is difficult, because it may include not only the necessity the use of a large flap but also the ability for three-dimensional movement of the neck. methods: A 41-year-old woman sustained a severe neck contracture with retraction of the lower lip and limited range of neck motion after a chemical burn. We used the combined scapular/parascapular flap to reconstruct the soft-tissue defect in the neck after excision of hypertrophic scar and release of contracture. The scapular portion was transferred to cover the defect vertically, and the parascapular portion was transferred to cover the transverse portion of the neck. This kind of design would allow the patient to move her neck more easily. RESULTS: Postoperatively, the range of motion of the neck was full in the vertical and horizontal directions after 6 months of rehabilitation. Also, the patient was satisfied with the final aesthetic results. CONCLUSION: The microsurgical combined scapular/parascapular flap, providing a large area of tissue for coverage in three dimensions with a reliable blood supply by only one pedicle anastomosis during surgery, is a good option for reconstruction of the severe neck contracture. We classify the inset of the combined scapular/parascapular flap into three types with six subtypes, according to the location of defects and the relation of the parascapular flap to the scapular flap.
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ranking = 1.8571428571429
keywords = neck
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5/62. Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction of neck and axillary burn contractures.

    Neck and axillary burn contractures are both a devastating functional and cosmetic deformity for patients and a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. Severe contractures are more commonly seen in the developing world, a result of both the widespread use of open fires and the inadequacy of primary and secondary burn care in these vicinities. When deep burns are allowed to heal spontaneously, patients develop hypertrophic scarring of the neck and axillary areas. The back is typically spared, however, remaining a suitable donor site. We have used nine latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps in a total of six patients, finding the flaps effective in resurfacing both the neck and the axillary regions after wide release of burn contractures. Before flap mobilization, surgical neck release is often necessary to ensure safe, effective control of the airway in patients with significant neck contractures. Flap bulkiness in the anterior neck region can eventually be reduced by dividing the thoracodorsal nerve. Anchoring the skin paddle to its recipient site through the placement of tacking sutures will also help achieve a more normal anterior neck contour.
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ranking = 1.4285714285714
keywords = neck
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6/62. Multiple pterygium syndrome: report of one case.

    Multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease which is characterized by multiple pterygium across the major joint and other associated anomalies. In this article, we report a male premature infant who was born with bizarre appearance: mask face with low set ear and micrognathia; pterygium of neck, antecubital, popliteal and intercrural area with four extremities flexion contracture. He was thought to be the first case report in taiwan. Besides, we review medical literature about this disease.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
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7/62. Free transfer of the radial forearm flap with preservation of the radial artery.

    One of the main disadvantages of the radial forearm flap is the sacrifice of a major artery. To overcome this drawback the authors describe a technique of free transfer of the flap with preservation of the radial artery. The flap is elevated as a distal row perforator-based fasciocutaneous flap with a very short segment of the radial artery included in the inverted-T-shaped arterial pedicle. The venous outflow of the flap is provided by the cephalic vein, with accompanying veins of the radial artery left behind. Although the donor radial artery is repaired primarily, the flap is transferred to reconstruct a soft-tissue defect resulting from the release of a neck contracture after radiotherapy in a 42-year-old patient who had previous excision of a mandibular osteosarcoma. The arterial anastomosis was performed end to end between the superior thyroid artery and one limb of the arterial pedicle, with the other limb ligated. The venous anastomosis was performed end to end between the cephalic vein and the external jugular vein. The flap survived completely and a satisfactory result was obtained. The radial artery is demonstrated to be patent long after surgery, both with Allen's test and with a Doppler examination. Considering the possible sequelae of the sacrifice of the radial artery, this technique is obviously advantageous to such patients, even with a nonsatisfactory preoperative Allen's test. This perforator-based radial forearm flap is very easy to raise and to transfer, with anastomoses of large-diameter vessels.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
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8/62. Pre-expanded arterialised venous free flaps for burn contracture of the cervicofacial region.

    Despite the fact that arterialised venous flaps provide thin good-quality tissue to repair defects of the face and neck, their clinical applications have been limited by an unstable postoperative course and variable flap necrosis. In an effort to resolve these problems, a tissue-expansion technique has been applied to the arterialised venous flap before flap transfer. Three pre-expanded arterialised venous free flaps have been used to treat post-burn scar contracture of the cervicofacial region. The donor site was confined to the forearm in each case. A rectangular expander was usually placed over the fascia of the flexor muscles in the proximal two-thirds of the forearm. The mean expansion period, volume and flap size were 44 days, 420 cm(3)and 147 cm(2), respectively. There were no complications caused by insertion and expansion. The cervicofacial region was successfully reconstructed, after excision of the post-burn contractures, with pre-expanded arterialised venous flaps, with no marginal necrosis or postoperative instability. Large thin arterialised venous flaps are well matched with the recipient defect in the cervicofacial area and the colour and texture match obtained with forearm tissue produced an aesthetically favourable result. Pre-expanded arterialised venous flaps are another new option for free flap reconstruction of the face and neck.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = neck
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9/62. Cephalic vein-pedicled arterialized anteromedial arm venous flap for head and neck reconstruction.

    The authors describe a case of transfer of an arterialized cephalic venous flap from the anteromedial arm region to the neck with the cranial limb of the cephalic vein serving as the drainage vein and a pedicle. The burn scar contracture of a 45-year-old man was released and repaired with a venous flap based on the cephalic vein in the anteromedial arm. After dissection of the cranial end of the cephalic vein as a drainage vein in the deltopectoral groove, until the flap could be transposed easily to the neck defect pedicled on the dissected cranial limb of the cephalic vein, the flap was arterialized by anastomosing the caudal end of the cephalic vein to a recipient artery in the neck The donor defect was skin grafted and the flap survived completely. The neck contracture improved substantially.
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ranking = 1.1428571428571
keywords = neck
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10/62. The subscapular approach in head and neck reconstruction with the pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    We have devised a new approach for transferring the pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap to the head and neck region, and have applied it successfully in several patients. Our approach is rapid and increases the arc of rotation in order to cover defects of the lower lateral and posterior aspects of the head and neck. The vascular pedicle is protected between the scapula and the rib cage. We have used this approach in 15 patients over the last 9 years with good results.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = neck
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