Cases reported "Convalescence"

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1/5. A case of Japanese encephalitis: CT and MRI findings in acute and convalescent stages.

    We studied the CT and MR images of a patient with Japanese encephalitis. The first symptom was general malaise with high fever. The diagnosis of meningoencephalitis was made by spinal tap and clinical presentation. CT on the third day of illness showed no significant findings. MRI on the fifth day of illness demonstrated that the left thalamus and bilateral putamen were hyperintense on T2-weighted images. On CT one month later, the density in the thalamus and bilateral putamen was normal. MRI two month later showed high signal intensity only in the left thalamus. The patient recovered, but was judged to have dementia according to the simple dementia scale of Hasegawa. Flaccid paralysis was observed during the acute period.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fever
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2/5. mumps virus neutralizing antibodies do not protect against reinfection with a heterologous mumps virus genotype.

    In April 1999, a previously healthy 22-year-old woman was taken ill with fever and bilateral swelling of the parotid glands. A chronic course of disease extending from April to December was found with swelling of the parotid glands, fatigue, low grade fever, episodes of tachycardia and nightswetting. mumps virus rna of genotype A character based on the SH (small hydrophobic) protein gene classification was demonstrated in three serum samples collected during the course of clinical disease. Different criteria for reinfection were fulfilled including demonstration of IgG antibodies by ELISA in a preinfection serum sample. The preinfection serum sample of the patient was able to efficiently neutralize the infectivity of a heterologous genotype D strain but was unable to neutralize the homologous genotype A virus. The findings in the present study may offer an explanation of a mechanism behind previously observed vaccine failures and the occurrence of reinfection with heterologous mumps virus strains.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fever
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3/5. Treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome with convalescent plasma.

    In March 2003, an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome started in hong kong. A 57-year-old woman had a typical presentation, including fever, non-productive cough, malaise, lymphopenia, and raised liver aminotransferases. The clinical course and successful treatment with convalescent plasma, ribavirin, and corticosteroids are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fever
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4/5. antibodies to an Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen synthetic peptide in infectious mononucleosis. Report of two cases.

    The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) contains a region of repeating glycine and alanine amino acids. It has been shown that this region contains a major epitope of EBNA-1. With well-characterized sequential sera from two cases of acute infectious mononucleosis, a specific IgM response was detected to the EBNA-1 synthetic peptide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conversely, an IgG response was observed in the convalescent phase of the illness with a progressive decline of the IgM antibodies. This response was observed with heterophil-positive and heterophil-negative EBV/IM. The peptide-specific serologic response was confirmed by immunoblotting, the serial serum samples on extracts of EBV transformed B-cells. There was excellent correlation between the antipeptide ELISA and blotting techniques.
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ranking = 97354.261541985
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis
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5/5. Virologic, immunologic, and clinical observations on a patient during the incubation, acute, and convalescent phases of infectious mononucleosis.

    One patient with infectious mononucleosis (IM) was studied from the probable time of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (38 days before the onset of clinically overt disease), during the incubation and acute phases, until 6 months after clinical remission. Analysis of spontaneous outgrowth of EBV-carrying lymphoblastoid cells, by limiting dilution on feeder layer cultures, showed that virus containing B lymphocytes are already present early during the incubation period. Also low interferon serum levels were detected early after infection, and only before the onset of clinical disease. All other studied clinical laboratory and virus-associated variables were within normal range during the incubation phase, but changed to a pattern characteristic of IM in parallel to the clinical symptoms. During the acute disease EBV-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA)-positive cells could be directly detected among the lymphocytes, and antibodies to EBV antigens appeared. lymphocytes stained by monoclonal antibodies, detecting Ia-like determinants (activated cells) and suppressor cells, increased dramatically, in parallel to a strong increase of functional suppressor cell activity, measured by inhibition of blastogenesis and PWM-induced immunoglobulin production. During the acute phase there was also a decrease of spontaneous cytotoxicity against the NK-sensitive cell line K562, while cytotoxicity (spontaneous) against an autologous EBV-positive lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) was detected only during this phase. These reactions correlated to the presence of blasts, and the autologous reaction was exerted mainly by Fc-receptor-negative cells. Lymphokine production in response to EBV antigens was also initiated during the acute phase. During the convalescence period the serological and cellular immune parameters adjusted to the pattern of a normal EBV-seropositive person.
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ranking = 97354.261541985
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis
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