Cases reported "Corneal Ulcer"

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1/4. Atypical mycobacterium keratitis.

    We present two cases of mycobacterium chelonae keratitis, both of which followed minor corneal trauma. One case initially showed improvement with medical therapy alone but eventually required penetrating keratoplasty. The second case required surgical intervention to provide tectonic support, but the infection resolved with antibiotic therapy.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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2/4. Ocular infections associated with eikenella corrodens.

    eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative rod-shaped anaerobe that colonizes the human mouth, nasopharynx, gut, and genitourinary tract. We treated a corneal ulcer from which E. corrodens was the primary isolate in an otherwise healthy man. We treated another patient who had recurrent bacterial endophthalmitis from which Eikenella was identified in mixed culture. Named for its ability to form pits in agar, the corroding bacillus is gaining recognition for its role in head and neck infections. Certain E. corrodens strains are mobile on moist surfaces and elaborate an endotoxin, which may destroy human tissues directly and indirectly by means of the immune system. The organism is usually resistant to aminoglycosides and penicillinase-resistant penicillins yet is susceptible to penicillin and some cephalosporins.
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ranking = 0.082119475434888
keywords = bacillus
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3/4. Bacterionema matruchotii ocular infections.

    One case of endophthalmitis and two cases of corneal ulceration, each occurring in a structurally altered eye, were associated with Bacterionema matruchotii, a gram-positive filamentous bacillus.
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ranking = 0.082119475434888
keywords = bacillus
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4/4. mycobacterium avium-intracellulare corneal ulcer.

    A healthy 28-year-old man developed a slowly progressive corneal ulcer 21 months after an episode of corneal trauma. Acid-fast bacilli were identified in corneal scrapings, and the causative organism was identified as mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Medical treatment with topical amikacin and oral rifampin was ineffective, and a therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to cure the infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a corneal infection caused by a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacterium (Runyon groups I, II, and III) and the first caused by M. avium-intracellulare. Slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria should be considered among those organisms that cause corneal infection, especially in cases characterized by a protracted course and lack of response to conventional antimicrobial therapy.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = mycobacterium
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