Cases reported "Coronary Disease"

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11/147. Atypical Bland-White-Garland syndrome with stenosis of the origin of the left coronary artery: catheter intervention after mammary artery bypass stenosis and residual fistula to the pulmonary trunk.

    A 16-year-old boy with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, Bland-White-Garland syndrome, underwent a mammary artery bypass grafting to the left coronary artery (LCA) together with closure of the stenosed origin of the left coronary artery. A residual LCA to pulmonary artery fistula and stenosis of the shunt at the implantation site developed that resulted in a dominant perfusion of the LCA from the right coronary artery. Interventional catheterization was performed with stenting of the LCA mammary artery anastomosis and subsequent coil occlusion of the residual fistula. After this intervention the LCA was exclusively perfused by the mammarian bypass with no residual leak to the pulmonary artery.
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keywords = fistula
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12/147. Echocardiographic characterization of a rare type of coronary artery fistula draining into superior vena cava.

    We describe an incidental finding of a rare type of anomalous coronary artery originating from the right coronary sinus of valsalva and draining into the superior vena cava. This was suspected on transthoracic echocardiography but was further clarified with the use of coronary angiography and transesophageal echocardiography. echocardiography was a major tool for delineating the origin of the fistula, its complicated course, and the drainage site.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = fistula
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13/147. Acquired internal mammary artery to pulmonary artery fistula following bypass surgery.

    We report two patients with acquired fistulas between the internal mammary and pulmonary arteries after coronary bypass surgery. This is a rare complication of bypass surgery and may be a cause of recurrent angina postoperatively due to coronary artery steal. A table of all the cases reported in the literature is compiled.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = fistula
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14/147. Segmental degradation of left ventricular wall motion after persistent coronary fistula in a posttransplantation patient: a case report and short review of literature.

    A 50-year-old man received an orthotopic heart transplant because of severe coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure. Two years after the transplantation, a continuous murmur occurred at the left sternal edge after repeated endomyocardial biopsies. echocardiography and coronary angiography revealed a dilated left anterior descending artery with a fistula to the right ventricle. The circumflex was large with an equally postero-lateral branch, and the right coronary artery was rather small with collaterals to the distal part of the left anterior descending branch. The patient had refused any intervention to close the fistula. The left ventricular levogram was normal. Two years later, in a follow-up angiogram, the left ventricular ejection fraction had decreased as a result of hypo- and akinesis of the apex and posterior wall. We suggest that this local wall motion disturbance derives from a steal phenomenon rather than being a sequela of rejection. The decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction was associated with shortness of breath upon moderate exercise. Standard heart failure medication relieved the patient's symptoms. The observation of local wall motion disturbances in this case, as well as conflicting views in the literature, raises the question whether postbiopsy coronary fistulas in transplant patients should be closed.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = fistula
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15/147. aneurysm in the pulmonary trunk associated with atrial septal defect, a left coronary artery fistula to the pulmonary trunk, and valvular pulmonary stenosis.

    A 78-year-old woman with an aneurysm in the pulmonary trunk associated with an atrial septal defect, left anterior descending coronary artery fistula to the pulmonary trunk and valvular pulmonary stenosis is reported. The aneurysm showed gradual dilatation over 16 years and was successfully treated using aneurysmorrhaphy. Although there has been some controversy regarding the optimum management for a pulmonary artery aneurysm, surgical correction is thought to be essential for aneurysms associated with congenital cardiac anomalies because of the high incidence of rupture.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = fistula
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16/147. Coronary artery fistula into a persistent left superior vena cava: report of a case.

    We herein report the rare case of a patient with coronary artery fistula (CAF) between the left circumflex coronary artery and persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with a complete absence of the right superior vena cava (SVC).
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = fistula
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17/147. Coronary artery-left ventricle fistula complicating balloon angioplasty--a case report.

    The authors describe a coronary artery fistula complicated balloon angioplasty. The proximal left anterior descending coronary artery was dilated, but a septal branch was occluded by thrombus. angioplasty was used on the septal branch, but a pseudoaneurysm communicating with the left ventricle occurred. Follow-up angiography revealed spontaneous closure of the fistula.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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18/147. Local pulmonary malformation caused by bilateral coronary artery and bronchial artery fistulae to the left pulmonary artery in a patient with coronary artery disease.

    At 10 years of age and again at 25, our patient had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis due to the presence of a localized pulmonary shadow. coronary angiography at age 59 revealed 3 fistulous communications: from the right and circumflex coronary arteries and from the left bronchial artery. All 3 emptied into the same recipient artery, the distal part of a left pulmonary artery branch, which produced substantial left-to-right shunt. On computed tomography, cystic formations could be seen in the pulmonic area. The pulmonary tuberculosis for which this patient had been treated in his youth was in the same part of the lung where the shunt was discovered. Our conclusion is that the initial diagnosis was in error.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = fistula
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19/147. Spontaneous closure of congenital coronary artery fistulas.

    Six cases of full spontaneous closure of congenital coronary artery fistulas, and one case of near closure, as seen by colour Doppler echocardiography, are presented. It is worth reconsidering the classical view that nearly all cases of spontaneous closure are eligible for surgical or percutaneous correction to prevent the development of significant and potentially fatal complications. As the natural course of coronary artery fistulas is still poorly defined, asymptomatic patients, especially those under 7 years old with small shunts, should be periodically followed up by echocardiography rather than be subjected to operative closure, even by catheterisation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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20/147. Outcomes of transcatheter embolization in the treatment of coronary artery fistulas.

    Thirteen children (seven male) with coronary artery fistula underwent percutaneous transcatheter occlusion. The age range was 8 months to 14 years (mean, 6.3 years). The fistulas had their origins from the right coronary artery (six), from the left anterior descending coronary artery (three), and from the left circumflex coronary artery (four). drainage was to the right ventricle (seven), the right atrium (three), and one each to the pulmonary artery, left atrium, and superior caval vein. The fistulas were closed with coils in 10 patients, a Rashkind double-umbrella device in 1 patient, and an Amplatzer Duct Occluder in 2 patients. Complete occlusion was achieved in 9 of 13 patients. Complications consisted of migration of coils in four and transient arrhythmias or changes in the resting electrocardiogram in four patients. follow-up studies 1 to 31 months (mean, 14.6 months) after occlusion noted only four patients with trivial (clinically insignificant) residual shunts. Owing to various coronary fistula morphologies, transcatheter occlusion requires availability of different embolization techniques. Short-term follow-up supports persistent clinical efficacy and transcatheter closure techniques as the initial form of therapy.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = fistula
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