Cases reported "Cough"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/67. Persistent cough in an adolescent.

    Jessica, a 14-year-old girl with a history of asthma, went to her pediatrician's office because of a persistent cough. She had been coughing for at least 3 months with occasional cough-free periods of less than a few days. The cough was nonproductive and was not accompanied by fever, rhinorrhea, or facial or chest pain. Jessica and her mother observed that the cough increased with exercise and typically was not present during sleep. She has used two metered-dose inhalers--albuterol and cromolyn--without any change in the cough pattern. For the past 5 years, Jessica has had mild asthma responsive to albuterol. She enjoys running on the cross-country team, soccer, and dancing. She is an average student and denies any change in academic performance. She has never been hospitalized or had an emergency department visit for asthma or pneumonia. There has been no recent travel or exposure to a person with a chronic productive cough, tobacco smoke, or a live-in pet. Jessica lives with her mother and younger sister in a 10-year-old, carpeted apartment without any evidence of mold or recent renovation. In the process of taking the history, the pediatrician noticed that Jessica coughed intermittently, with two or three coughs during each episode. At times, the cough was harsh; at other times, it was a quiet cough, as if she were clearing her throat. She was cooperative, without overt anxiety or respiratory distress. After a complete physical examination with normal findings, the pediatrician interviewed Jessica and her mother alone. Jessica's parents had been divorced for the past 6 years. She lived with her mother but visited her father, and his new family with two young children, every weekend. She spoke about this arrangement comfortably and said that she loved her father and mother but didn't like the tension she experienced at her father's home. "I don't like adults arguing when kids are around." When asked why she thought the cough persisted so long, she commented in a neutral tone, "I don't know. It's never been like this before." Jessica's pediatrician prescribed an inhaled steroid with the albuterol. When the cough did not respond after 1 week, he ordered a chest radiograph (normal) and a tuberculin skin test (purified protein derivative-negative), and he added montelukast (a leukotriene inhibitor) and monitored airway resistance with a peak flow meter. The cough persisted, and the peak flow recording showed normal airway resistance. At this time, Jessica's pediatrician suspected a conversion reaction and contemplated the next best therapeutic strategy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/67. Lady Windermere syndrome: middle lobe bronchiectasis and mycobacterium avium complex infection due to voluntary cough suppression.

    An 81-year-old woman who presented with middle lobe bronchiectasis and mycobacterium avium complex infection is described. She had a history of habitual suppression of cough, as in Lady Windermere syndrome. She was thin and had mild kyphoscoliosis but had no history of smoking or connective tissue disease. The middle lobe and lingula are predisposed to chronic inflammation because of their particular anatomic structures. Inability to clear the secretions from the airway due to voluntary cough suppression may predispose to bronchiectasis and M. avium complex infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/67. Diaphragmatic rupture: A complication of violent cough.

    The cough is a complex physiologic response designed to protect airways from unwanted secretions and foreign materials. Violent and paroxysmal coughs are associated with many complications. In this article, we will discuss a patient who sustained diaphragmatic rupture as a result of violent coughing. The possible mechanisms of this rare complication are explained.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/67. Lingual tonsillectomy for refractory paroxysmal cough.

    Historically, the lingual tonsils are the most neglected members of Waldeyer's ring. They are often overlooked even in a thorough head and neck exam because of their anatomic location and the ambiguous constellation of symptoms which they produce when they are diseased or enlarged. The lingual tonsils have been reported to be associated with a variety of upper aerodigestive tract symptoms including odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, globus, halitosis, chronic cough, and dyspnea. Many patients with lingual tonsillar pathology may undergo extensive work-up for some of these non-specific upper airway complaints by their primary physician before referral to an otolaryngologist. Consequently, the diagnosis of lingual tonsillar disease requires a high index of suspicion and a thorough physical exam including evaluation of the tongue base and hypophaynx with indirect mirror or fiberoptic exam. In order to draw attention to this frequently unrecognized entity, we present a case report of a child with chronic cough resulting from lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/67. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the trachea with airway hyperresponsiveness.

    We report a case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the trachea in a 23-year-old pregnant female in her 39th week. The patient had cough and wheezing in the early morning for 9 months before admission. No abnormalities were detected on a chest roentgenogram. At Caesarean section, fiberscopy revealed a polypoid lesion narrowing the trachea. The pathologic diagnosis made from the biopsy specimen obtained was low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma and the lesion was resected. Airway hyperresponsiveness was shown before resection with airflow limitation, however, airway reactivity and airflow limitation improved 1 year after resection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/67. lidocaine inhalation for cough suppression.

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effectiveness of lidocaine in suppressing cough which is a logical extension of its established use in bronchoscopy. Nebulized lidocaine, preceded by standard nebulized albuterol inhalation driven by oxygen was given to suppress cough in a selected group of patients with intractable cough severe enough to disrupt daily life activities, especially sleep. patients included those with asthma, reactive airways disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In these selected patients, nebulized lidocaine was very effective in suppressing cough, and thus buying time for more definitive therapies to work. This observation merits further study and confirmation for the benefit of patients.(Am J Emerg Med 2001;19:206-207.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/67. Repair of concomitant inguinal and femoral hernias under local anaesthesia.

    We describe the case of a 91-year-old patient with small bowel obstruction due to an obstructed groin hernia. It was decided to repair the hernia under local anaesthesia and sedation because of the patient's age and medical condition. At surgery, concomitant inguinal and femoral hernias were found and repaired. We discuss the technique of repairing groin hernias under local anaesthesia, especially in the elderly, and the previously reported incidence of concomitant hernias.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.061527893927113
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/67. A case of cough, lymphocytic bronchoalveolitis and coeliac disease with improvement following a gluten free diet.

    Chronic cough is a common reason for presentation to a respiratory clinic. In up to 20% of cases the cause remains unclear after investigations. We report one such case where there was bronchoscopic evidence of lymphocytic airway inflammation in association with newly diagnosed coeliac disease. All features improved markedly on a gluten free diet, suggesting a causal relationship between coeliac disease, cough, and lymphocytic bronchoalveolitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/67. syncope in an adult with uncontrolled asthma.

    cough syncope occurs primarily in middle-aged male smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has also been described in children with asthma. I report the case of a 34-year-old nonsmoker who had syncope due to coughing, and who also related a 1-year history of cough with wheezing. Chest examination revealed diffuse wheezing and a prolonged expiratory phase, and pulmonary function testing with a methacholine challenge confirmed hyperreactive airways. Notably, while undergoing spirometric testing he had a recurrent syncopal episode. His syncope resolved with medical therapy for asthma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/67. Bronchial foreign body presenting as an accidental radiological finding.

    The aspiration of a foreign body in an airway is usually associated with respiratory distress, wheeze and persistent cough. The highest incidence of foreign body inhalation occurs between the age of 1 and 3 years [Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol. 89 (1980) 434: Med. J. Aust. 2 (1983) 322]. Asymptomatic and long standing foreign bodies may lead to complications such as recurrent pneumonia, bronchiectasis, atelectasis and even death. We present here a case of a metallic bronchial foreign body, which was discovered only as an accidental radiological finding on a chest X-ray, which was done for a mild lower respiratory tract infection, presumably 4 months after such an aspiration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = airway
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cough'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.