Cases reported "Cough"

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1/10. Pharyngo-oesophageal haemangioma with a positive cough impulse.

    Benign tumours of both the pharynx and oesophagus are rarely seen, cavernous haemangiomas even less so. We present a case in which a large lesion was the cause of non-specific symptoms but which only appeared intermittently on nasendoscopic examination of the pharynx.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/10. Spontaneous expulsion of a mediastinal lymph node in carcinoma of the esophagus.

    A case of spontaneous expulsion of a mediastinal lymph node, which developed during the follow up of a patient with carcinoma of the esophagus is presented. To the best of our knowledge, no such instance of natural extrusion of mediastinal lymph node has been reported in the literature.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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3/10. Esophageal diverticulum in an infant with Down's syndrome and type III esophageal atresia.

    An 18-month-old infant with Down's syndrome presented with a symptomatic esophageal diverticulum (ED) located at the cervical esophagus. He had been operated on successfully for an esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula in the newborn period. Neither surgical maneuvers nor esophageal trauma could explain the ED, which was resected through a cervical approach.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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4/10. Aberrant right subclavian artery syndrome: a case of chronic cough.

    A young, otherwise healthy man had chronic cough of 16 months' duration. Evaluation revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery. Kommerell's diverticulum without aneurysmal degeneration was present. Imaging studies showed compression of the esophagus but not the trachea. Results of methacholine challenge test were negative for evidence of reactive airway disease, but suggested mild variable intrathoracic obstruction. While aberrant right subclavian artery syndrome most commonly involves dysphagia, our patient's only symptom was cough. Right subclavian artery to right common carotid artery transposition was performed, with oversewing of the subclavian artery stump to the left of the esophagus through a right supraclavicular incision. This treatment was curative, with complete resolution of symptoms.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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5/10. Inlet patch of gastric mucosa in upper esophagus causing chronic cough and vocal cord dysfunction.

    BACKGROUND: An inlet patch of gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus is usually an incidental, congenital finding found during upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. Although it has been reported to cause dysphagia, strictures, adenocarcinoma, and webs, it has never been associated with cough and vocal cord dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: To report the first case of a patient with an inlet patch of gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus as the cause of a particularly troublesome, chronic cough that was initially missed on 2 upper endoscopies. methods: The patient is a 50-year-old man with a 7-year history of chronic cough associated with hoarseness, shortness of breath, and globus sensation. For diagnostic evaluation, pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, rhinolaryngoscopy, upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy, and histologic examinations were performed. RESULTS: A multidisciplinary approach revealed several possible causes for the chronic cough, including vocal cord dysfunction, postnasal drip syndrome, allergic rhinitis, and mild gastroesophageal reflux disease that was only partially responsive to therapy. The results of 2 initial upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopies were interpreted as normal. A third endoscopy detected an inlet patch of gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus. Treatment with a high-dose histamine type 2 receptor antagonist and a proton pump inhibitor alleviated the patient's symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: An inlet patch of gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus is not uncommon, but it is often overlooked or believed to be an incidental, congenital finding. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of an inlet patch resulting in a troublesome, chronic cough.
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ranking = 8
keywords = esophagus
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6/10. Achalasia and tracheal obstruction in a child.

    A 13-year-old patient was referred for evaluation of pulmonary symptoms and was subsequently diagnosed to have achalasia. An esophagram revealed a dilated esophagus which obstructed the trachea at the thoracic outlet during a forced expiratory maneuver. Pulmonary function tests, obtained before and after esophagomyotomy, are presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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7/10. Delayed halitosis-a rare cause.

    A 38-year-old tuberculous male Pakistani presented with halitosis and a cough especially marked when lying on his left side. barium swallow demonstrated a fistula between oesophagus and left main bronchus. Anti-tuberculous therapy and repeated cauterization failed to close the fistula. thoracotomy confirmed a congenital oesophago-bronchial fistula. Division and suture resulted in cure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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8/10. Irritable oesophagus syndrome as cause of chronic cough.

    Case of an infant with chronic cough is reported. The most frequent causes of chronic cough were ruled out. Twenty-four hour oesophageal pH-monitoring showed a close correlation between gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes and cough attacks. The patient was successfully treated with cisapride (0.3 mg/kg t.i.d.). These findings show that irritable oesophagus syndrome can cause chronic cough.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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9/10. Spectrum of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    There is a growing body of clinical and research evidence to support the role of gastroesophageal reflux in the etiology of certain disorders occurring in structures located above the body of the esophagus. These supraesophageal complications have only recently been identified but substantiation of the role of gastroesophageal reflux has been difficult and sometimes impossible with the technology currently available. This introductory article to the clinical issues involved in supraesophageal complications of GERD presents several index cases and asks far more questions than it gives answers about these patients. Clinical evidence supporting the role of GERD is discussed and the results of therapy reviewed. education of the practicing physician to the role of supraesophageal complications of GERD is urged to help recognize the likelihood of such clinical conditions. There is a real need for additional clinical use and evaluation of multi site intraesophageal and pharyngeal pH probes in patients with suspected supraesophageal complications of GERD. More importantly, development of new techniques for measuring micro reflux events and sophisticated methods for determining the duration of acid exposure in tissues above the esophagus is essential. Finally, more prospective controlled outcome studies of patients with supraesophageal complications of GERD are needed utilizing specific treatment algorithms.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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10/10. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in an adult.

    We present a rare case of a congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in a 54-year-old woman with a history of poor feeding tolerance since infancy and repeated pulmonary infections. She initially presented with epigastric and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Her workup included a barium esophagogram that revealed a fistula between her midesophagus and a left lower lobe segmental bronchus. The fistula was divided, a left lower lobe superior segmentectomy was performed, and an intercostal muscle was placed over the esophageal closure. The patient noted an immediate decrease of postprandial coughing. Congenital respiratory esophageal fistulas that are not associated with esophageal atresia may persist into adulthood before they become clinically apparent. The diagnosis should be considered in certain individuals with suggestive symptomatology and unexplained respiratory pathology.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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