Cases reported "Cough"

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1/8. A "fishy" cough: hepatobronchial fistula due to a pyogenic liver abscess.

    A hepatobronchial fistula is an anatomic communication between the liver parenchyma and the bronchial tree. Major causes of such fistulae include inflammatory conditions resulting from obstruction of the biliary tract and infectious processes, such as pyogenic liver abscesses, amoebiasis, and hydatid cysts. We report a rare case of a patient (with a chronic, recurrent hepatic abscess) who suffered a persistent, productive cough resulting from a hepatobronchial fistula.
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2/8. Foreign body aspiration in adults.

    Foreign body aspiration is not an uncommon problem, particularly in children, the elderly, and those with predisposing factors like neurological impairment. In adults, regional differences exist in the type of foreign body aspirated. We report four cases of foreign body aspiration in South Asian adults, three of which were related to the widespread habit of chewing stimulant seeds such as betel nuts (two) and tamarind seed (one). It is important for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of foreign body inhalation in the appropriate clinical setting. bronchoscopy is necessary not only for the diagnosis but also for the removal of foreign body from the bronchial tree. Once the foreign body is removed, the improvement in symptoms is usually dramatic, making it rewarding for any physician to manage.
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3/8. Granular cell myoblastoma of the bronchus. Case report and literature review.

    A case of multiple granular cell myoblastomas of the tracheobronchial tree is presented. The patient is well 32 months following endobronchial removal. Only 46 cases of solitary and two cases of multiple lesions of the tracheobronchial tree have been described in the literature. These lesions occur with equal frequency in men and women; at a median age of 38 years; more frequently on the right than on the left; and most commonly with cough as the presenting symptom. Most patients have been treated with major surgical resections, but conservative endobronchial removal may be effective therapy.
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4/8. Endobronchial lipoma.

    The endobronchial lipoma is one of the rarest tumours of the tracheobronchial tree. They are histologically benign tumours. But, they can produce pulmonary damage or irreversible bronchiectasis if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. The treatment of choice in most cases is bronchoscopic removal. A case report of this rare tumour is presented with its clinical features, early clinical course, and treatment.
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5/8. Respiratory diseases and food allergy.

    Both upper and lower respiratory tracts can be affected by food allergy. Manifestations in either may be exclusively due to food allergy (common in infants) or may result from the combined effects of food allergy plus another defect such as gastroesophageal reflux, a congenital defect of the heart or tracheo-bronchial tree, an immunodeficiency syndrome such as isolated IgA or IgG4 deficiency, or a concomitant inhalant allergy. Chronic rhinitis is the most common respiratory tract manifestation of food allergy. When it occurs in conjunction with lung disease, it may be a helpful indicator of activity of the allergic lung disease and of the patient's compliance in following a specific diet. Recurrent serous otitis media may be solely or partially due to food allergy. Large tonsillar and adenoid tissues, sometimes with upper airway obstruction, may be caused, or aggravated by, food allergies. Lower respiratory tract disease manifested by chronic coughing, wheezing, pulmonary infiltrates, or alveolar bleeding may also occur. Lower respiratory tract involvement is generally associated with a greater delay in onset of symptoms and with a larger quantity of allergen ingestion than chronic rhinitis. food allergy should be considered when there is a history of prior intolerance to a food in childhood or of symptoms beginning soon after a particular food was introduced into the diet. It is an important consideration in patients who have chronic respiratory tract disease which does not respond adequately to the usual therapeutic measures and is otherwise unexplained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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6/8. Tracheobronchial mucoid pseudotumors.

    A collection of mucus, indistinguishable from tumor, can be shown in the tracheobronchial tree, particularly during tomography. These "mucoid pseudotumors" may be distinguished from true tumors by documenting their disappearance after having the patient cough.
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7/8. Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica. Report of a young man with severe disease and retrospective review of 18 cases.

    Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica (TPO) is a rare condition of unclear cause. Sporadic cases have been published from all over the world, but some geographical differences in the occurrence may exist. The condition is characterized by cartilaginous or bony outgrowths into the lumen of the tracheobronchial tree. Clinicians should include this disease in the list of differential diagnoses when confronted with symptoms like persistent and often productive cough, haemoptysis, dyspnoea and wheeze. If the condition is extensive, there may occur unexpected and acute clinical problems. We describe the case of a young man in whom we diagnosed a severe form of TPO while examining him for asthma. This patient suffered also from ozaena and the combination of these two conditions is rather common. We also retrospectively reviewed our material of 18 cases with this condition.
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8/8. Pedicled pericardial patch repair of a carinal bronchogenic cyst.

    Bronchogenic cysts should be completely removed. Small communications with the tracheobronchial tree occur, but extensive involvement is rare. A case of bronchogenic cyst replacing the carina and the medial wall of the right and left main bronchi is presented. Resection and reconstruction was accomplished by using a pedicled pericardial patch to close the defect created by removal of the bronchogenic cyst. Follow-up at 2 years shows an excellent result.
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