Cases reported "Cranial Nerve Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/42. Vascular malformation (so-called hemangioma) of Scarpa's ganglion.

    vascular malformations of the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA) arising from the capillary plexus surrounding Scarpa's ganglion are rare tumors. We report a case of so-called "hemangioma" of the CPA which was operated on via a trans-labyrinthine approach based on a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma. Although there are some differences between these tumors in terms of the clinical, biological and especially MRI findings, surgery is usually performed based on an assumption of vestibular schwannoma. Surgery is the treatment of choice for these lesions as early intervention ensures better postoperative facial function. It is important to make the differential diagnosis if conservative management of vestibular schwannoma is adopted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/42. Hemangiomas of the geniculate ganglion.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the presentation, evaluation, and management of patients with geniculate ganglion hemangioma. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Tertiary-care academic medical center. patients: Six patients with hemangiomas of the geniculate ganglion, evaluated and managed at a single institution. INTERVENTION: All patients underwent imaging and follow-up, with five of the patients undergoing operative intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tumor size and extent, facial nerve and hearing function, histopathologic findings, and complications are discussed as a function of observation versus microsurgical excision. RESULTS: Six patients with ossifying hemangiomas of the geniculate ganglion were evaluated at a single institution over a 10-year period. These patients underwent operative intervention when their facial nerve function began to decline. hearing was preserved in five of the six cases. Resection and grafting of the facial nerve was required in five of six cases. Two of the six cases were found to have histologic evidence of facial nerve infiltration on pathologic examination. CONCLUSION: The majority of these tumors infiltrated the facial nerve and could not be completely removed without excision of the nerve itself. Based on this experience, it would seem reasonable to defer surgical excision until facial nerve function has declined to grade 3 or worse. Whether earlier subtotal excision would result in better outcomes or not remains unanswered. This study presents several complicated scenarios that illustrate the difficulty of clinical decision-making in this disease. Associated clinical dilemmas and controversies are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/42. Promontory electrical stimulation in postoperative acoustic tumor patients.

    Complete deafness can follow acoustic tumor surgery and results from labyrinthine injury, auditory nerve trauma, and/or vascular compromise. A central auditory prosthesis is one potential rehabilitative strategy in such patients. Anatomical studies suggest that some spiral ganglion cells may survive after vascular occlusion, and we have demonstrated responses to electrical stimulation in patients after labyrinthectomy. It was thus hypothesized that patients deafened after a hearing conservation attempt, but maintaining an intact auditory nerve, could utilize an intracochlear implant. To investigate this possibility, promontory electrical stimulation was performed on three patients who had tumors less than 2 cm and who had serviceable preoperative hearing, but no responses postoperatively. Behavioral responses and electrically evoked auditory brainstem and middle latency responses were obtained from two patients, one of whom was 6 years postsurgery. These data indicate that a cochlear implant may be possible after acoustic tumor surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/42. Are vestibular sensory cells preserved after destruction of Scarpa's ganglion? A study based on metastatic tumors of temporal bone.

    OBJECTIVE: The contribution of nerve fibers to the maintenance of vestibular sensory cells is a controversial issue in previous studies using animals and has not yet been studied in humans. The authors investigated this issue by observing vestibular end organs in the temporal bone of three patients in whom the internal auditory canal was infiltrated with tumor cells, and Scarpa's ganglion cells showed complete degeneration. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: University Hospital, Department of otolaryngology. patients: Three patients with malignant metastatic temporal bone tumors. INTERVENTION: We investigated the preservative state of vestibular sensory hair cells with the Scalpa's ganglion was destructed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Maintenances of vestibular sensory hair cells. RESULTS: We found that sensory cells were intact despite the severe destruction of Scarpa's ganglion cells in two of the patients. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that human vestibular sensory cells can be maintained for an indefinite period after denervation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/42. Cavernous malformation of the trigeminal nerve.

    A cavernous malformation involving the Gasserian ganglion, 2nd and 3rd divisions of the trigeminal nerve on the left side was resected via an extradural route in a 54 year old male. Cavernous malformations of the cranial nerves are rare. Specific origin from the trigeminal nerve has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/42. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the facial nerve as a cause of recurrent facial palsy: case report.

    This is a report of a case presenting recurrent facial palsy due to inflammatory pseudotumor of the facial nerve. The patient was a 41-year-old man suffering from facial palsy on the right side once in 1983, which recurred in 1988. The initial facial palsy was cured after conservative treatments including steroid administration. Three months after the recurrence, the same treatments were attempted without noticeable effect. He was referred to our clinic two and half months later. Electromyographic examination indicated pronounced denervation of the facial nerve. Imaging study including high resolution CT and MRI revealed a mass lesion around the geniculate ganglion. Facial neuroma was initially suspected. Surgical exploration revealed a tumor involving the geniculate ganglion and the horizontal portion of the facial nerve. The tumor was resected through a combined transmastoid and middle cranial fossa approach, followed by nerve grafting. Histologically, the tumor proved to be an inflammatory pseudotumor originating from the nerve sheath, although the etiologic factor causing the inflammation was not verified.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/42. Primary malignant melanoma of the gasserian ganglion associated with neurofibromatosis.

    A case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma of the left gasserian ganglion associated with temporal lobe gliosis in a patient suffering from von Recklinghausen's disease is reported. The association of primary malignant melanoma of the trigeminal nerve and neurofibromatosis is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 412.11592947397
keywords = gasserian ganglion, gasserian, ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/42. Intracranial fibro-osseous lesion. Case report.

    A rare tumor closely associated with the trigeminal ganglion produced a syndrome of atypical facial pain in a 44-year-old man. Two previous reports have designated similar tumors as "fibro-osseous lesions." The distinctive morphological appearance is illustrated and possible histogenesis discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/42. Intratemporal facial nerve neurinoma--case report.

    A 59-year-old female had episodes of vertigo for 13 years, right tinnitus for 6 years, and right hearing difficulty for 2 years. She had no facial nerve dysfunction or other neurological deficits. Postcontrast computed tomography (CT) did not show abnormalities, but a wide, high-window CT scan revealed erosion of the petrous pyramid on the right side. magnetic resonance imaging clearly delineated the entirety of a small tumor transecting the petrous bone. At operation a neurinoma was found to originate from the facial nerve proximal to the geniculate ganglion; it was totally removed. This case is unique in that she had a long history of signs and symptoms of acoustic nerve disturbance, but no facial nerve dysfunction whatsoever.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/42. Gasserian ganglion schwannoma with orbital extension.

    A patient with painless proptosis and no associated neurologic symptoms was found to have a cystic retrobulbar orbital mass. The initial computed tomography (CT) scan did not demonstrate any intracranial involvement. On orbital biopsy a schwannoma was encountered and repeat CT scan with contrast revealed a large middle cranial fossa mass with extension into the orbit through the optic canal and superior orbital fissure. On lateral transfrontal craniotomy the lesion was noted to arise from the gasserian ganglion and to involve the right cavernous sinus. Subtotal resection was performed, and the patient has remained asymptomatic and free of recurrence for 18 months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 83.223185894794
keywords = gasserian ganglion, gasserian, ganglion
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cranial Nerve Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.