Cases reported "Craniocerebral Trauma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/72. Objective pulsatile tinnitus: case report.

    Anomalies in the vascular structures of the neck, cranial base, temporal bone, and intracranial circulation may give rise to pulsatile tinnitus. If the anomalous sound is perceived also by others, then it is defined as objective tinnitus. Herein, the case is reported of right pulsatile tinnitus of one year's duration, which appeared after cranial trauma. magnetic resonance angiography showed that the jugular bulb was dominant on the same side as the tinnitus. The tinnitus was recorded with a high-sensitivity microphone, while otoacoustic emissions were measured by distortion products during follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/72. Into hot water head first: distribution of intentional and unintentional immersion burns.

    INTRODUCTION: Experience with several, previously unreported, intentional face-first immersion burns led us to evaluate the distribution of inflicted and unintentional immersion scald burns in a hospital series. SETTING: (1) Authors' clinical and legal practices; (2) Burn center at regional Level 1 trauma hospital. SUBJECTS:: (1) Case series of face-first, inflicted immersion burn victims; (2) Consecutive hospitalized scald burn victims younger than 5 years old, 1/3/1996 to 3/25/2000. methods: (1) Individual case reports; (2) Retrospective records review. Simple descriptive statistics, Fisher Exact test and t test. RESULTS: (1) Six cases of inflicted head and neck immersion injury are described. Four were tap water and 2 food/drink scalds. (2) 22/195 hospitalized victims had sustained immersion burns, 13 from tap water and 9 from other fluids. Six (46%) tap water immersions and no (0%) other immersions had inflicted injuries (P = 0.05). Two of the tap water immersions and one other source immersion included burning of the head and neck. Of these, one tap water immersion, but no other immersion, was inflicted. In no patients were head and neck injuries the sole or predominant site of scalding. In all, 9 children sustained inflicted scalds. Bilateral lower extremity tap water immersion scalds occurred in 100% (6/6) of abusive and 29% (2/7) of unintentional injuries (P = 0.02). Buttock and perineal injuries occurred in 67% (4/6) inflicted versus 29% (2/7) unintentional tap water immersion scalds (P = 0.28). Other fluids caused bilateral lower extremity immersion burns in 3/9 (33 %) unintentionally injured patients, but no abused children (NS). CONCLUSIONS: Craniofacial immersion injury, although seen by the authors in legal cases, is infrequent. It was present incidentally in one inflicted tap water burn in the consecutive hospital series. This series affirms the predominance of bilateral lower extremity burns in inflicted tap water immersions. Buttock/perineal immersions were more common with abuse than with unintentional injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/72. Retropharyngeal space swelling secondary to minor blunt head and neck trauma.

    Retropharyngeal space swelling is a rare occurrence following minor head and neck trauma. Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening sequela. The authors present a case of retropharyngeal space haematoma following minor blunt head and neck trauma. Management was conservative with gradual spontaneous resolution of the haematoma. The literature is reviewed and the management and treatment principles presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/72. Case report: whiplash-associated disorder from a low-velocity bumper car collision: history, evaluation, and surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a patient with a whiplash-associated disorder following a bumper car collision. Imaging studies failed to provide an anatomic explanation for the debilitating symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To report a chronic, debilitating pain syndrome after a low-velocity bumper car collision while using complex range-of-motion data for the diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical indication in whiplash-associated disorder. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The controversy of whiplash-associated disorder mainly concerns pathophysiology and collision dynamics. Although many investigations attempt to define a universal lesion or determine a threshold of force that may cause permanent injury, no consensus has been reached. methods: Eight years after a low-velocity collision, the patient underwent surgical excision of multiple painful trigger points in the posterior neck. Computerized motion analysis was used for pre- and postoperative evaluations. RESULTS: Surgical treatment resulted in an increase in total active range of motion by 20%, reduced intake of pain medication, doubled the number of work hours, and generally led to a dramatic improvement in quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: This case of whiplash-associated disorder after a low-velocity collision highlights the difficulty in defining threshold of injury in regard to velocity. It also illustrates the value of computerized motion analysis in confirming the diagnosis of whiplash-associated disorder and in the evaluation of prognosis and treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/72. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery presenting with oculosympathetic palsy.

    BACKGROUND: Blunt internal carotid artery (ICA) injury is rare but undiagnosed can have disastrous clinical consequences. AIM: To report a late presentation of blunt ICA injury in a young male following a road traffic accident. RESULT: A 16-year-old male presented 11 days following a head injury with a unilateral Horner's syndrome. Imaging confirmed a pseudoaneurysm of the ICA. The patient was treated with anticoagulant therapy. CONCLUSION: diagnosis of ICA injury requires a high index of suspicion and presentation with unusual neurological signs following blunt trauma to the head and neck requires prompt investigation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/72. Gracilis muscle flap for aesthetic reconstruction in the head and neck region.

    Microsurgical tissue transfer has constantly improved the therapeutic options for reconstruction in the head and neck region, but the ideal flap has yet to be found. The purpose of this study is to discuss the aesthetic potential of the free gracilis muscle flap in difficult head and neck reconstruction. We report our experience with the free gracilis muscle flap in seven patients who underwent reconstruction in the head and neck region for a variety of indications. In all seven patients, the transplanted muscle flaps healed well, with no flap loss. postoperative complications consisted of skin-graft loss in one patient requiring a second split-thickness skin graft. Donor-site morbidity was minimal in all patients. For difficult reconstruction in the head and neck region, the free gracilis muscle flap offers a number of advantages, including reliable vascular anatomy, relatively great plasticity, and a concealed donor area. Thus this type of flap offers a valuable option whenever an aesthetically pleasing result is sought.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/72. Post-traumatic migraine: chronic migraine precipitated by minor head or neck trauma.

    Minor trauma to the head or neck is occasionally followed by severe chronic headaches. We have evaluated 35 adults (27 women, 8 men) with no prior history of headaches, who developed recurrent episodic attacks typical of common or classic migraine following minor head or neck injuries ("post-traumatic migraine"-PTM). The median age of these patients was 38 years (range 17 to 63 years), which is older than the usual age at onset of idiopathic migraine. The trauma was relatively minor: 14 patients experienced head trauma with brief loss of consciousness, 14 patients sustained head trauma without loss of consciousness, and 7 patients had a "whiplash" neck injury with no documented head trauma. Headaches began immediately or within the first few days after the injury. PTM typically recurred several times per week and was often incapacitating. The patients had been unsuccessfully treated by other physicians, and there was a median delay of 4 months (range 1 to 30 months) before the diagnosis of PTM was suspected. The response to prophylactic anti-migraine medication (propranolol or amitriptyline used alone or in combination) was gratifying, with 21 of 30 adequately treated patients (70%) reporting dramatic reduction in the frequency and severity of their headaches. Improvement was noted in 18 of the 23 patients (78%) who were still involved in litigation at the time of treatment. The neurologic literature has placed excessive emphasis on compensation neurosis and psychological factors in the etiology of chronic headaches after minor trauma. physicians must be aware of PTM, as it is both common and treatable.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/72. The value of repeat cerebral arteriography in the evaluation of trauma.

    In most patients with head or neck trauma, a single angiogram is sufficient to guide therapy. For those who improve slowly or not at all, however, this is not an adequate basis for diagnosis. Angiography should be repeated after an interval of time to exclude development of a surgically correctable lesion, such as pseudoaneurysm or intracerebral or extracerebral fluid collection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/72. The deep inferior epigastric rectus abdominis muscle and myocutaneous free tissue transfer: further applications for head and neck reconstruction.

    The rectus abdominis muscle and myocutaneous free tissue transfer is a well-recognized donor site for reconstruction of complex head and neck defects. Four composite deformities were successfully managed using this donor site. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous "sandwich" flap was used for closure of a pharyngocutaneous fistula and to provide intraoral lining and external coverage for a composite mandibular defect. The rectus muscle flap was used to obliterate a compound frontal sinus injury and an orbitomaxillary defect. All flaps were based on the deep inferior epigastric vascular pedicle.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/72. head and neck trauma in taxicabs. A growing urban problem.

    The passage of mandatory seat belt legislation has markedly decreased the incidence of head and neck trauma to passengers in private automobiles. However, taxicabs are exempt from seat belt laws in many states. seat belts, which are included as standard equipment by automobile manufacturers, are often made inaccessible by taxicab operators. We present five cases of head and neck trauma sustained by passengers in taxicabs in which seat belts were not accessible. Injuries included laryngeal fractures, maxillofacial trauma, and severe trauma to the cervical spine. All injuries could have been avoided by the use of an accessible safety belt. The nationwide scope of this problem and strategies for modification of existing laws for better protection of passengers in cars for hire are presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Craniocerebral Trauma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.