Cases reported "Critical Illness"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/4. Psychological implications of admission to critical care.

    Admission to critical care can have far-reaching psychological effects because of the distinct environment. critical care services are being re-shaped to address long-term sequelae, including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The long-term consequences of critical illness not only cost the individual, but also have implications for society, such as diminished areas of health-related quality-of-life in sleep, reduced ability to return to work and enjoy recreational activities (Audit Commission, 1999; Hayes et al, 2000). The debate around the phenomenon of intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome is discussed with reference to current thinking. After critical care, patients may experience amnesia, continued hallucinations or flashbacks, anxiety, depression, and dreams and nightmares. nursing care for patients while in the critical care environment can have a positive effect on psychological well-being. Facilitating communication, explaining care and rationalizing interventions, ensuring patients are oriented as to time and place, reassuring patients about transfer, providing patients,where possible, with information about critical care before admission and considering anxiolytic use, are all practices that have a beneficial effect on patient care. Follow-up services can help patients come to terms with their experiences of critical illness and provide the opportunity for them to access further intervention if desired. Working towards providing optimal psychological care will have a positive effect on patients' psychological recovery and may also help physical recuperation after critical care.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/4. Sudden traumatic death in children: "we did everything, but your child didn't survive".

    When caring for children who become suddenly and catastrophically ill, clinicians must simultaneously attend to a complex and rapidly evolving medical situation, as well as to the equally challenging demands of establishing compassionate relationships with family members and communicating well with colleagues. An 18-month-old toddler was brought to the hospital with severe head injury after being struck by a car. Over a period of hours, her condition evolved from prognostic uncertainty to the diagnosis of brain death and considerations of organ donation. Against this medical backdrop, the clinicians successfully established a trusting relationship with family members by careful attention to their emotional, informational, and care needs as they absorbed the devastating prognosis, took in the results of the brain death examination, and considered the option of organ donation. This case illustrates the importance of interdisciplinary communication, the vital role of social workers and other psychosocial providers with expertise in working with families, and the critical significance of mutual care and support for the clinicians who accompany families through these tragic life events.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/4. decision making in critically ill patients with hematologic malignancy.

    hematologic neoplasms that were previously considered fatal are now potentially curable with techniques such as bone marrow transplantation. Such therapies also carry significant morbidity and mortality. With the increasing application of these therapies, a growing number of physicians are using medical decision making regarding critical care for these patients. The process by which ethical decisions are reached for these critically ill patients may be baffling because of several factors: rapidly evolving treatments, uncertain probabilities of the cure of the malignant disorder, the relatively young age of many of these patients, and the poor prognosis with critical illness. I discuss a process to reach acceptable decisions, providing a case example of the application of the process. This process is derived from the ethical principles that drive decision making in general medicine and attempts to maximize patients' autonomy. It involves a consideration of accurate information regarding the disease process and the prognosis, a clear delineation of the goals of the medical care, and communication with patients. Appropriate, ethical, and consistent decisions regarding the critical care of patients with hematologic malignancy can be reached when these considerations are addressed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/4. Transcatheter treatment of life-threatening lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to advanced pelvic malignancy.

    We present two patients with life-threatening, massive, lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Selective pelvic arteriography demonstrated that the site of bleeding originated from a pseudoaneurysm of the right internal iliac artery with fistulous communication to the sigmoid colon in one patient and from the left internal iliac artery into the rectum in the second patient. Transcatheter embolotherapy was then performed using balloon occlusion in one patient and coil embolization in the second patient. The iliac arteries should also be evaluated in patients with pelvic cancer who present with lower GI bleeding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Critical Illness'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.