Cases reported "Cross Infection"

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1/9. mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis in two patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    We present two cases of non-resolving peritonitis treated with a standard peritonitis protocol. The organism identified from the peritoneal effluent was mycobacterium fortuitum, a group IV (Runyon's classification) rapidly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium. M. fortuitum is ubiquitous and can be isolated from a number of natural sources. risk factors these two patients had for developing M. fortuitum peritonitis included underdialysis, the immunocompromised state associated with end stage renal disease, prior or prolonged broad spectrum antibiotic treatment, and possible exposure to environmental factors, since both were hospitalized at about the same time. The isolates were resistant to the conventional antibiotics recommended for the treatment of this mycobacterium. Both patients, however, responded to catheter removal and antibiotics administered according to the sensitivities of the mycobacterium isolated. copyright copyright 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel
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keywords = mycobacterium
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2/9. Epidemiological investigation of ochrobactrum anthropi strains isolated from a haematology unit.

    ochrobactrum anthropi is an oxidase-producing gram-negative bacillus preferring aqueous environments. It is an opportunist of low pathogenicity with a wide and unpredictable antibiotic resistance. We observed bacteraemia caused by this organism in two immunocompromized patients hospitalized in the same haematology unit and catheter-associated sepsis was recognized within two days. Another isolate was obtained from the stools of a third patient of the same unit. Environmental investigations recovered an isolate from a tap-water sample of the unit. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of these four isolates and two others isolates previously found in the same ward, showed identical restriction patterns for the two blood isolates and confirmed that the two bacteraemia were epidemiologically related.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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3/9. stenotrophomonas maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant.

    Stenotrophomonas (xanthomonas) maltophilia is an aerobic, non-fermentative, gram-negative bacillus that is generally considered an opportunistic pathogen. Infections due to S. maltophilia have become increasingly important in the hospital environment. patients compromised by debilitating illnesses, surgical procedures or indwelling vascular catheters are most prone to S. maltophilia infections. To our knowledge, we report the first case of S. maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant of 31 weeks gestational age. Although the therapy of choice for severe infections caused by S. maltophilia remains to be decided, this patient was successfully treated by amikacin.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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4/9. acinetobacter calcoaceticus pneumonia and the formation of pneumatoceles.

    Pneumatoceles are cystic lesions of the lungs often seen in children with staphylococcal pneumonia and positive-pressure ventilation. acinetobacter calcoaceticus is an aerobic, short immobile gram-negative rod, or coccobacillus, which is an omnipresent saprophyte. The variant anitratus is the most clinically significant pathogen in this family, usually presenting as a lower respiratory tract infection. Acinetobacter has been demonstrated to be one of the most common organisms found in the ICU. We present three critically ill surgery patients with Acinetobacter pneumonia, high inspiratory pressures, and the subsequent development of pneumatoceles. One of these patients died from a ruptured pneumatocele, resulting in tension pneumothorax. Treatment of pneumatoceles should center on appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy. This should be culture directed but is most often accomplished with imipenem. Percutaneous, computed tomographic-guided catheter placement or direct tube thoracostomy decompression of the pneumatocele may prevent subsequent rupture and potentially lethal tension pneumothorax.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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5/9. An epidemic in a coronary care unit caused by pseudomonas species.

    Five patients in a coronary care unit were involved in an epidemic caused by a nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus, presumptively identified by our laboratory as pseudomonas cepacia. All medications administered intravenously to these patients were cultured. Because morphine was the only such medication common to the treatment of all the patients involved, a vial used in the unit at that time was cultured, as were two previously-entered vials of saline solution and several sterile vials of distilled water used in the preparation of injectable medication. The pseudomonas cepacia organism was recovered from one of the vials of saline solution. The epidemic ended as soon as the practice of re-entering the vials of sterile saline solution was discontinued.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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6/9. Fatal lung abscess due to lactobacillus casei ss rhamnosus.

    A fatal case of community acquired pneumonia due to lactobacillus casei ss rhamnosus is reported. Clinicians should be aware of this type of pneumonia.
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ranking = 1.6766603716175
keywords = bacillus
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7/9. Nosocomial ventriculitis due to Roseomonas gilardii complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Roseomonas gilardii is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been recognized as a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of ventriculitis caused by R. gilardii in a 54-year-old man with a subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a vertebral artery aneurysm; discuss previous reports of this organism as a nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, laboratory diagnosis, and patient management.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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8/9. infection caused by the nonfermentative gram-negative bacillus CDC group IV c-2: case report and literature review.

    A 10-year-old girl with acute lymphocytic leukemia developed nosocomial septicemia caused by the gram-negative bacterium CDC group IV c-2. Recovery of the patient followed appropriate treatment with ceftriaxone, to which the organism was susceptible in vitro. Four other reported cases of infection caused by this organism are reviewed.
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ranking = 1.341328297294
keywords = bacillus
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9/9. Intravenous line infection due to ochrobactrum anthropi (CDC Group Vd) in a normal host.

    ochrobactrum anthropi, formerly known as achromobacter species (CDC group Vd), is an aerobic, gram-negative bacillus widely distributed in aquatic environments. Most important, it has been implicated as a cause of intravenous line infection in immunocompromised hosts with solid tumors or hematologic malignancies. trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and aminoglycosides are usually active against O. anthropi, but this organism is usually resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. Because O. anthropi is a low-virulence organism, patients with intravenous-line infections have been cured without removal of the intravenous catheter. We describe a case of intravenous-line infection in a normal host that was successfully resolved alter catheter removal.
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ranking = 0.3353320743235
keywords = bacillus
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