Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/12. Acute abdomen as an atypical presentation of meningococcal septicaemia.

    The clinical manifestations and course of meningococcal disease have been well described, but atypical presentations may, if unrecognized, lead to a delay in treatment. We describe here an unusual case of this disease in a 21-y-old woman who presented with an acute rigid abdomen, clinical and laboratory features of sepsis, shock and early DIC with no indication of meningococcal infection. She developed a rapidly spreading purpuric rash, conjunctival haemorrhages, hypotension and tachycardia and a low urine output. Laboratory investigations showed a low platelet count, low haemoglobin and normal WBC. A presumptive diagnosis of meningococcal septicaemia was made and recovery followed treatment with cefotaxime, fluids and inotropes. A fully sensitive neisseria meningitis Group C, type 2a, subtype NT was isolated from blood cultures, but not from CSF obtained after antibiotic treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/12. streptococcus pneumoniae peritonitis postpartum.

    A peritonitis caused by an ascending infection is a rare complication postpartum. A 37-year-old woman presented with a secondary peritonitis due to streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient had given birth to a healthy boy 4 weeks before and showed no symptoms of a bronchitis on admission. An operation was performed after the patient developed an acute abdomen, showing a diffuse peritonitis. High vaginal swabs and blood cultures taken on admission were positive for S. pneumoniae as well as the specimen taken during the operation. Thus we concluded that this was a case of an ascending infection. After antibiotic therapy with penicillin the patient could be discharged 8 days after the operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/12. A new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patient: secondary pneumococcal peritonitis with jejunitis.

    We report the first case of secondary pneumococcal peritonitis associated with acute jejunitis in a 52-year-old homeless child-Pugh C cirrhotic man without ascitis. The patient was admitted with clinical signs of peritonitis, and jaundice. Morphologic examination was unremarkable. A laparotomy revealed a diffuse peritonitis, and an acute jejunitis with prenecrotic lesion. The lesion was located within the first centimeters of the jejunum, immediately after the duodeno-jejunal angle, extented on 15 cm. A resection of the first 15 cm of the jejunum was performed with duodeno-jejunal side-to-side manual anastomosis. Gram-stain and cultures of blood, peritoneal pus, and jejunal mucosa revealed a penicillin-sensitive streptococcus pneumoniae. Appropriate parenteral antibiotic treatment was initiated (aminopenicillin). The postoperative course was marked by a transient hepatic failure associated with an ascitis controlled by diuretics. The patient was discharged on the 26th day after surgery. This case reports a new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/12. liver abscess due to bacillus cereus: a case report.

    bacillus cereus is a food-borne pathogen that causes a self-limiting gastroenteritis. We describe the case of a 72-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of acute abdominal colic pain. Over a 2-day period, her clinical condition deteriorated rapidly, with the appearance of acute abdomen. Computed tomography investigation of the abdomen showed a liver abscess (diameter approximately 3 cm). At laparotomy, the abscess was found to be ruptured to the free peritoneal cavity. The final clinical diagnosis was acute peritonitis due to a ruptured liver abscess. bacillus cereus was isolated from culture of the pus. Up to now, no case of liver abscess due to this organism has been reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/12. Polymicrobial bacteremia caused by escherichia coli, edwardsiella tarda, and shewanella putrefaciens.

    edwardsiella tarda, a member of enterobacteriaceae, is found in freshwater and marine environments and in animals living in these environments. This bacterium is primarily associated with gastrointestinal diseases, and has been isolated from stool specimens obtained from persons with or without clinical infectious diseases. shewanella putrefaciens, a saprophytic gram-negative rod, is rarely responsible for clinical syndromes in humans. Debilitated status and exposure to aquatic environments are the major predisposing factors for E. tarda or S. putrefaciens infection. A 61-year-old woman was febrile with diarrhea 8 hours after ingesting shark meat, and two sets of blood cultures grew escherichia coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens at the same time. She was successfully treated with antibiotics. We present this rare case of polymicrobial bacteremia caused by E. coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens without underlying disease, which is the first found in taiwan. This rare case of febrile diarrhea with consequent polymicrobial bacteremia emphasizes that attention should always be extended to these unusual pathogens.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/12. CAPD peritonitis--initial presentation as an acute abdomen with a clear peritoneal effluent.

    Accepted criteria for the diagnosis of peritonitis in CAPD include: 1. symptoms and signs of peritoneal irritation; 2. a cloudy effluent with white blood cell (WBC) count greater than 100/microliters and; 3. a positive culture. In fact, the earliest suggestive sign of peritonitis is a turbid effluent. However, symptomatology of peritoneal irritation may precede the development of a cloudy fluid. We hereby report on two CAPD patients with culture proven peritonitis whose initial presentation was that of an acute abdomen. Although diffuse rebound tenderness was elicited the initial effluent, after an overnight dwell, was clear with a WBC count of 80 and 70/microliters, respectively. Working diagnoses on admission included a ruptured cyst and a perforated peptic ulcer. Both patients were in line for a laparotomy. After a period of 7 and 12 hours, respectively the ensuing effluents turned turbid with WBC counts of 6,400 and 2,500/microliters. Cultures eventually grew staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus viridans. Appropriate antibiotic treatment resulted in full recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/12. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with penicillium chrysogenum.

    BACKGROUND: Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin b lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. DISCUSSION: penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin b. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/12. A case of group B streptococcal pyomyositis.

    The group B streptococcus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of serious infections including bacteremias, puerperal sepsis, and neonatal meningitis. Group B streptococcal infections of muscle are rare. We report here an unusual case of group B streptococcal pyomyositis. pyomyositis arises predominantly from infections caused by staphylococcus aureus and, occasionally, streptococcus pyogenes. Because of the rarity of pyomyositis in temperate climates, the common lack of localizing signs or symptoms, and the frequently negative blood cultures, considerable delay often precedes the diagnosis of pyomyositis; in fact, the infection has been initially misdiagnosed as muscle hematoma, cellulitis, thrombophlebitis, osteomyelitis, or neoplasm. diagnosis may be greatly aided by radiologic techniques that can demonstrate the sites of muscle enlargement and the presence of fluid collections. The response to antibiotics is usually rapid, but resolution of the infection may require aspiration of deeply situated muscle abscesses. This report describes a diabetic patient with an unusual presentation of pyomyositis that mimicked an acute abdomen.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/12. Acute abdomen in the patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    When patients who have a ventriculoperitoneal shunt present with an acute abdomen, shunt infection may be the cause. The authors relate the cases of three such patients. Two underwent a laparotomy which failed to show any abnormality and which in retrospect might have been avoided. They review the literature and present a systematic approach to the diagnosis and management of this problem. Specific clues from the patient's history, physical examination and further investigation may clarify the diagnosis. When shunt infection cannot be excluded and the clinical setting does not warrant immediate laparotomy, shunt externalization, cerebrospinal fluid culture, empiric antibiotic therapy and close observation of the patient are recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/12. Posttransplant lymphocele presenting as 'acute abdomen'.

    Lymphoceles occurring after renal transplantation are frequently asymptomatic and are usually identified on routine ultrasonography of the allograft. A small percentage of them may increase in size and manifest due to their compression effects on adjacent structures or as lymphocutaneous fistula. An infected lymphocele would, in addition, give rise to local and systemic features. A case of infected lymphocele occurring 4.5 months after cadaveric renal transplant is reported. The patient presented in septicemia and features of generalized peritonitis. Emergency diagnostic laparoscopy revealed fluid collection in the peritoneal cavity. However, on exploratory laparotomy no intra-abdominal pathology was detected. Further evaluation revealed a large perigraft lymph collection which was drained percutaneously. Fluid and blood cultures grew staphylococcus aureus. The patient recovered completely following external drainage and antibiotic administration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.