Cases reported "Cutaneous Fistula"

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1/54. Development of a colocutaneous fistula in a patient with a large surface area burn.

    A 61 year old female sustained a large surface area burn, complicated by inhalation injury. One month before the incident, she had undergone a left hemicolectomy with colorectal anastomosis for diverticular disease. Due to the severity of her burns, multiple surgical debridement and skin grafting procedures were required, including a large fascial debridement of her flank and back. Her hospital course was complicated by recurrent episodes of pulmonary and systemic infection, as well as pre-existing malnutrition. Prior to her discharge to a rehabilitation center, stool began to drain from her left posterior flank. This complication represented a colonic fistula arising from the recent colon anastomosis. The fistula was managed nonoperatively and gradually closed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a colocutaneous fistula spontaneously draining from the abdomen via the retroperitoneum in a burn victim, not related to direct thermal injury to the peritoneal cavity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/54. Postoperative alveolar hydatid disease with cutaneous-subcutaneous involvement.

    The first Japanese case of alveolar hydatid disease with cutaneous-subcutaneous lesions is reported. The patient, a 58-year-old man who developed an indurated subcutaneous tumor on the right side of the abdomen, had had partial hepatectomy of the right lobe for echinococcosis thirteen years earlier. Clinically, the tumor was adherent with a fistulosis communication to deeper structures. Histopathologically, multiple PAS-positive cuticular layers with foreign body granulomas and fibrosis were observed between the dermis and subcutaneous fatty tissue. Surgical excision of the swelling provided the patient with temporary relief. To our knowledge, only eight cases of subcutaneous alveolar hydatid disease have been reported throughout the world. Ours, the ninth case, highlights the importance and difficulty of treating of alveolar hydatid disease.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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3/54. Management of a patient with hepatic-thoracic-pelvic and omental hydatid cysts and post-operative bilio-cutaneous fistula: a case report.

    In humans, most hydatid cysts occur in the liver and 75% of these are single. Our patient was a 31 year-old male. His magnetic resonance imaging (MR) showed one cyst (15 x 20 cm) in the right lobe and three cysts (5 x 6 cm, 8 x 6 cm, and 5 x 5 cm) in the left lobe of the liver, two cysts (4 x 5 cm and 5 x 5 cm) on the greater omentum, and two cysts (15 x 10 and 10 x 10 cm) in the pelvis. The abdomen was entered first by a bilateral subcostal incision and then by a Phennenstiel incision. Partial cystectomy capitonnage was done on the liver cysts; the cysts on the omentum were excised, and the pelvic cysts were enucleated. The cyst in the right lobe of the liver was in communication with a thoracic cyst. An air leak developed from the thoracic cyst which had underwater drainage and bile drainage from the drain in the cavity of the right lobe cyst. Sphincterotomy was done on the seventh post-operative day by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). No significant effect on mean bile output from the fistula occurred. octreotide therapy was initiated, but due to abdominal pain and gas bloating the patient felt and could not tolerate, it was stopped on the fourth day; besides, it had no decreasing effect on bile output during the 4 days. Because air and bile leak continued and he had bile stained sputum, he was operated on on post-operative day 18. By right thoracotomy, the cavity and the leaking branches were closed. By right subcostal incision, cholecystectomy and T-tube drainage of the choledochus were done. On post-operative day 30, he was sent home with the T-tube and the drain in the cavity. After 3 months post-operatively, a second T-tube cholangiography was done, and a narrowing in the distal right hepatic duct and a minimal narrowing in the distal left hepatic duct were exposed. Balloon dilatation was done by way of a T-tube. bile drainage ceased. There was no collection in the cavity in follow-up CT scanning, so the drain in the cavity, and the drainage catheter in the right hepatic duct were extracted. Evaluation of the biliary ductal system is important in bilio-cutaneous fistulas, and balloon dilatation is very effective in fistulas due to narrowing of the ducts.
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ranking = 8
keywords = operative
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4/54. Closure of an oropharyngocutaneous fistula in an irradiated patient. A case report.

    A case of oropharyngocutaneous fistula is presented in a preoperatively irradiated patient. A double-layer closure, using a modified Owens flap, was used to obtain a satisfactory result.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/54. Management of chyle fistulization in association with neck dissection.

    Chylous fistula after neck dissection is a relatively rare but potentially lethal complication. Sequelae range from severe fluid, electrolyte, and protein loss to fistula formation, skin-flap necrosis, and carotid blowout. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential to avoid injury to the thoracic duct or right lymph duct. After surgery, drainage of large amounts of fluid, particularly if milky, may alert the surgeon to the danger of chylous leakage. Certain diagnosis, however, is not so easy. Once the diagnosis is made, the management has to address the immediate and late effects of the loss of chyle into an operative site. This article seeks to examine these factors through review of the literature and personal experience with the problem. Total parenteral nutrition allows for control of the fluid and protein loss while avoiding flow of chyle, and in most cases it results in resolution. In those cases that do not resolve, fibrin glue with some type of mesh and muscle flaps usually succeed in closure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/54. Possibilities of preventing osteoradionecrosis during complex therapy of tumors of the oral cavity.

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of tumors of the head and neck. Their successful treatment is one of the greatest challenges for physicians dealing with oncotherapy. An organic part of the complex therapy is preoperative or postoperative irradiation. Application of this is accompanied by a lower risk of recurrences, and by a higher proportion of cured patients. Unfortunately, irradiation also has a disadvantage: the development of osteoradionecrosis, a special form of osteomyelitis, in some patients (mainly in those cases where irradiation occurs after bone resection or after partial removal of the periosteum). Once the clinical picture of this irradiation complication has developed, its treatment is very difficult. A significant result or complete freedom from complaints can be attained only rarely. attention must therefore be focussed primarily on prevention, and the oral surgeon, the oncoradiologist and the patient too can all do much to help prevent the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis. Through coupling of an up-to-date, functional surgical attitude with knowledge relating to modern radiology and radiation physics, the way may be opened to forestall this complication that is so difficult to cure.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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7/54. Coil embolization of a false aneurysm with aorto-cutaneous fistula after prosthetic graft replacement of the ascending aorta.

    AIM: To report palliative embolization of a false aneurysm over the distal suture line of an ascending aorta graft replacement. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A 78-year-old male patient was admitted for increasing bleeding of a chronic manubrium ulceration, 20 months after coronary artery bypass complicated by perioperative ascending aorta dissection requiring prosthetic graft replacement. One month later, he underwent epiploplasty for a mediastinitis followed by long-term antibiotic therapy. Five months later, he presented with a manubrium ulceration of the sternotomy. Spiral computerized tomography (CT) and aortography revealed a 20 mm anterior peri-prosthetic false aneurysm with a wide neck. Advanced age, active mediastinitis and patient's objection led us to perform percutaneous occlusion according to the Moret remodeling technique while protecting the coils release with balloon catheter inflation. RESULTS: No post-operative complication was observed and at 1-year follow-up the patient was doing well with no recurrent bleeding. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spiral CT controls confirmed coils stability without any internal flow. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous coils embolization of a large false aneurysm in the ascending aorta can be a palliative treatment in a surgically unsuited patient.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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8/54. Management of a high-output postoperative enterocutaneous fistula with a vacuum sealing method and continuous enteral nutrition.

    A postoperative enterocutaneous fistula is one of the most complex medical problems. Its treatment may become long-lasting, wearisome, and its outcome often is disappointing. Here, we describe the use of a novel device to treat a 67-year-old patient with a postoperative, high-output enterocutaneous fistula. A semipermeable barrier was created over the fistula by vacuum packing a synthetic, hydrophobic polymer covered with a self-adherent surgical sheet. To set up the system, we constructed a vacuum chamber equipped with precision instruments that supplied subatmospheric pressures between 350 and 450 mm Hg. The intestinal content was, thus, kept inside the lumen, restoring bowel transit and physiology. The fistula output was immediately reduced from a median of 800 ml/day (range, 400-1,600 ml/day), to a median of 10 ml/day (range, 0-250 ml/day), which was readily collected by the apparatus. Oral feeding was reinitiated while both parenteral nutrition and octreotide were withdrawn. No septic complications occurred, and the perifistular skin stayed protected from irritating intestinal effluents. Both the fistula orifice and the wound defect fully healed after 50 days of treatment. We believe this method may serve as a useful tool to treat selected cases of high-output enterocutaneous fistulas without the need for octreotide or parenteral nutrition.
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ranking = 6
keywords = operative
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9/54. Spontaneous late carotid-cutaneous fistula following radical neck dissection: a case report.

    The authors present an unusual case of a spontaneous carotid-cutaneous fistula occurring as a late complication 4 years after radical neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy for tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma in a 50-year-old patient. The etiologic factors predisposing patients to carotid artery rupture following radical neck dissection and a surgical option for carotid artery reconstruction instead of ligation are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/54. Conservative treatment of iatrogenic urinary fistulas: the value of cyanoacrylic glue.

    Once previously attempted conservative maneuvers have failed, iatrogenic persistent urinary fistulas usually require difficult repeated operations. We describe 3 patients in whom cyanoacrylic glue was used to repair endoscopically persistent urinary fistulas occurring after major pelvic surgery. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, all patients were free of urinary leakage and had no evidence of recurrent urinary fistulas. This approach may represent a safe and effective way to repair postoperative urinary fistulas.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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