Cases reported "Cutis Laxa"

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1/106. Two forms of cutis laxa presenting in the newborn period.

    Two infants are described with congenital cutis laxa. They represent two distinct disorders. In the first, congenital cutis laxa is associated with a generalized disorder of elastic tissue in which there may be diaphragmatic or other hernias, diverticula of the gastrointestinal or urinary tract and infantile emphysema. The disease is fatal often within the first year. In the second, congenital cutis laxa is associated with widely patent anterior fontanel, a variety of malformations, and retarded growth and development. Recognition of these distinct syndromes in the newborn period and their recessive inheritance permit realistic discussion of the prognosis which is very different from the benign dominant forms of cutis laxa.
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2/106. cutis laxa.

    Two sisters with inherited generalized cutis laxa and a young man with possible acquired cutis laxa are presented.
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3/106. Increased fibroblast elastase activity in acquired cutis laxa.

    BACKGROUND: Acquired cutis laxa is a rare disease characterized by sagging skin, premature wrinkling and reduced skin elasticity. observation: We report a 21-year-old woman, who presented with acquired cutis laxa on the face and the ear lobes. Urticarial papules had preceded for 6 years. There was no systemic involvement. Skin specimens were obtained from lax skin and urticarial papules, and from healthy controls. histology showed only few perivascular lymphocytes in lax ear skin and a dense inflammatory infiltrate in urticarial skin. In both biopsies elastic fibres were decreased as demonstrated by computerized morphometric analyses. Elastase activities of fibroblasts in culture were evaluated. There was a 2- to 3-fold increase in elastase activity in urticarial skin fibroblasts, contrasting with a normal elastase activity in lax ear skin. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the inflammatory cells could play a significant role in the destruction of elastic fibres.
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4/106. cutis laxa acquisita: is there any association with borrelia burgdorferi?

    We report the first case of an acquired form of generalized cutis laxa which has positive serology and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result for lyme borreliosis. A 44-year-old man complained of excessively loose skin for four years and had no family history of any skin disease. Dermatological examination showed lax and wrinkled skin all over the body (especially on the cheeks and the intertriginous areas). Positive serology for lyme borreliosis and the presence of borrelia burgdorferi dna which was demonstrated by nested PCR in this acquired form of cutis laxa is interesting since it has not been reported in literature previously.
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5/106. The role of plastic surgery in congenital cutis laxa: a 10-year follow-up.

    The clinical features and the plastic surgery management of a 23-year-old woman with cutis laxa are presented. Two rhytidectomies were performed in this patient within 1 year. The first was associated with a SMAS flap; the second employed a prehairline incision. The evolution of the aging facial appearance 10 years after the last face lift was evaluated and compared with the preoperative situation. Repeated face lifts seem to be an interesting way to manage patients with cutis laxa. Unlike patients with other disorders of the connective tissue, those with cutis laxa have no vascular fragility and heal well. The role of plastic surgery and the clinical features and timing for operation are reviewed and discussed.
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6/106. Neuroaxonal leukodystrophy associated with congenital cutis laxa: report of an autopsy case.

    A male patient, who was born with congenital cutis laxa characterized by cutaneous laxity due to the degeneration of elastic fibers, presented with an arrest of mental and motor development at the age of 3 years. The progressive decline of the psychomotor abilities led to the patient's death at the age of 4 years and 9 months. An autopsy revealed extensive white matter degeneration, characterized by the formation of numerous neuroaxonal spheroids and a diffuse loss of axons and myelin sheaths. The centrum semiovale and the cerebellar white matter were the most severely affected. The ultrastructure of the spheroids was consistent with a dystrophic type of axonal swelling. neurons of the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, and some brain stem nuclei were lost in moderate to severe degrees, and there were relatively few neuroaxonal spheroids in the gray matter. The pallidum and substantia nigra were well preserved. Neuroaxonal leukodystrophy, in which the spheroid formation predominantly affects the white matter, is the rarest variant of primary neuroaxonal dystrophies, and there are very few reports of autopsied cases. Among the reported cases, two Japanese siblings had congenital skin lesions similar to those of our case. The unique association of neuroaxonal leukodystrophy and congenital cutis laxa may form a distinct variant in this disease category.
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7/106. osteoma cutis coexisting with cutis laxa-like pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable disorder of elastic fibers characterized by yellowish, coalescing papules on the loose and wrinkled flexural area. There have been no reports of osteoma cutis associated with PXE. A 17-year-old Korean girl presented cutis laxa-like marked wrinkling on the flexural area, and a skin biopsy specimen revealed multiple foci of ossification with irregularly clumped, basophilic-stained elastic fibers in the reticular dermis and calcium deposits along the elastic fibers. Ultrasonographic evaluation showed multiple tiny osteomas diffusely scattered along the entire abdominal wall, axillae, and medial aspect of the upper arms. We report the first case of osteoma cutis coexisting with cutis laxa-like PXE.
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8/106. Bilateral eyelid edema: cutis laxa or blepharochalasis?

    A 59-year-old woman with massive bilateral edema of the upper and lower eyelids is presented. The edema occurred suddenly and without provocation. No cause could be identified despite a multitude of examinations. Initially the patient was diagnosed as having blepharochalasis, but later skin biopsy suggested an acquired form of cutis laxa. Most likely the cutis laxa was a result of angio-edema. Pharmacological treatment was not successful, but surgical intervention provided an acceptable result. The differential diagnosis of periorbital edema is discussed with special attention to cutis laxa, angio-edema, and blepharochalasis.
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9/106. Congenital corneal opacification in De Barsy syndrome.

    A newborn male was noted to have bilateral congenital corneal opacification. Findings from examination disclosed a variety of dysmorphic features, including cutis laxa, progeroid aspect, short stature, multiple hyperextensible subluxated joints, muscular hypotonia, and hyperreflexia. Bilateral penetrating keratoplasties were performed; histopathologic examination revealed diffuse epithelial thickening, loss of the Bowman layer, and stromal attenuation with anterior stromal scarring. Special stains showed no deposition of abnormal material in the corneas. Electron microscopy demonstrated absence of Bowman layer differentiation with a paucity of collagen fibers, as well as extensive small elastic fibers in the anterior stroma. The diagnosis of De Barsy syndrome was made, a rare progeroid syndrome associated with characteristic ocular, facial, skeletal, dermatologic, and neurologic abnormalities. De Barsy syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of congenital corneal opacification; its distinctive clinical features enable the clinician to easily differentiate it from other causes of congenitally cloudy corneas.
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ranking = 0.125
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10/106. anetoderma arising in cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    anetoderma is circumscribed atrophy of the skin due to a localized deficiency in elastic tissue. It can follow inflammatory skin diseases of several types, and occasionally is present in the skin around neoplasms. There are a few reports of anetoderma in the lesional skin of cutaneous lymphoma. We report on two patients who presented with multiple lesions of anetoderma and who later proved to have low-grade cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. One patient (Patient 1) is a 39-year-old man and the other patient is a 26-year-old woman who is a renal transplant recipient (Patient 2). Some biopsy specimens from the anetodermic skin of Patient 1 appeared to show an urticarial reaction, although plasma cells were present. A large nodule showed lymphoid follicles surrounded by plasmacytoid lymphocytes, with loss of elastic tissue in the adjacent dermis. The plasmacytoid cells stained overwhelmingly for lambda light chain, and staining of the urticarial lesions from this patient also showed a marked majority of lambda positive cells. Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) rearrangements showed a dominant clonal pattern in the nodular lesion. We classified the disease in Patient 1 as marginal zone lymphoma and the disease in Patient 2 as a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Because of the intimate association of anetoderma and cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders in these two patients, it seems possible that anetoderma could result from either a local effect of the neoplastic cells or associated inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils as in Case 1. The infiltrates of Case 1 had many interstitial neutrophils and only a few clonal plasmacytoid lymphocytes, indicating that this presentation of B-cell lymphoma can be a diagnostic pitfall. Given these two cases and similar ones in the literature, biopsy of lesional skin in anetoderma should be performed to ensure that lymphomatous infiltrates are not present. Even if plasma cells are sparse, studies to detect clonality are appropriate. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma can be added to the list of associations of elastolysis and cutaneous lymphoma, which includes granulomatous slack skin (T-cell lymphoma) and cutis laxa (myeloma).
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