Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. Anti-Yo positive paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with ovarian carcinoma: case report and review of the literature.

    paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare nonmetastatic neurological complication in cancer patients. Anti-Yo is one of the anti-onconeural antibodies found in PCD patients. It is believed that anti-Yo occurs almost always in women and is most likely associated with gynecologic or breast cancers, although exceptions exist. Here we report a PCD patient with ovarian cancer having high-titer anti-Yo. The acute onset of her PCD symptoms mimicked that of a stroke. Her ovarian cancer tissue contained abundant plasma cells and lymphocytes. After a thorough review of the literature, we propose a schematic hypothesis for the autoimmune pathogenesis of PCD. Despite anecdotal case reports of neurological improvement with different combinations of treatment, including IVIg, there is still no definitely effective treatment for PCD. Further research on the pathogenesis of PCD may lead to more effective therapies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. Gemcitabine-induced radiation recall dermatitis following whole pelvic radiation therapy.

    OBJECTIVES: radiation recall dermatitis secondary to gemcitabine use has been reported in isolated cases of patients treated for breast and lung cancers. There have been no reports of radiation recall dermatitis from gemcitabine after whole pelvic radiation therapy employed as a treatment of a gynecologic cancer. CASE: A 67-year-old woman was treated with whole pelvic radiation for palliation of lower extremity swelling and pain due to recurrent ovarian adenocarcinoma. Three months later, the patient was treated with gemcitabine for three courses. Therapy was discontinued secondary to severe cellulitis and edema of the skin of the anterior abdominal wall in the field of her prior radiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: radiation recall dermatitis secondary to gemcitabine should be considered in any patient with pelvic or lower abdominal skin abnormalities after pelvic radiation and subsequent gemcitabine therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Management of advanced-stage primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube: case report and literature review.

    Primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube is a very unusual gynecologic malignancy that accounts for less than 1% of all malignancies of the female genitalia. A 55-year-old, gravida 7, para 3 woman presented with no gynecologic complaints other than backache. TVS demonstrated a 35 x 25 mm heterogeneous mass that was not clearly separated from the left ovary, and another 31 x 14 mm cystic septated lesion in the left ovary region. Pelvic MRI demonstrated a 35 x 35 x 20 mm left adnexal mass that enhanced with contrast and a neighboring tubular-cystic mass. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed no malignancy. serum CA 125-level was merkedly elevated at 369 U/ml (normal < 35 U/ml). laparotomy revealed left hydrosalpinx and a papillary-fimbrial mass. Pelvic lymph node metastases were observed. Frozen-section analysis identified the mass as a serous adenocarcinoma. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, appendectomy, omentectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, and peritoneal washing were performed. The definitive histopathological diagnosis was primary serous adenocarcinoma of the fallopian tube with six of 25 lymph node biopsies showing metastasis. Six cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) plus cisplatin (75 mg/m2) combinatin chemotherapy were administered with 3-week intervals between cycles. Second-look laparotomy was performed; there was no evidence of disease. At the time of writing 12 months after the second-look laparotomy, she was still disease-free.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Management of bilateral fallopian tube carcinoma coexistent with tuberculous salpingitis.

    Primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube is a rare gynecologic malignancy. Chronic tubal inflammation is associated with primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube. There are only a few reports on primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube coexisting with tuberculous salpingitis. We are reporting a patient with both the primary carcinoma of the fallopian tube and tuberculous salpingitis, which were detected in bilateral fallopian tubes. The histologic type was serous adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated with total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, infracolic omentectomy, and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy followed by chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and cisplatin. She has been alive without evidence of disease for 18 months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Mixed serous and endometrioid carcinoma of the fallopian tube: a case report with literature review.

    Malignant neoplasms of the fallopian tube are the rarest of the gynecologic cancers. The frequency of histologic subtypes has been difficult to ascertain from the literature because most authors have not classified these tumors according to their cell types. Papillary serous adenocarcinoma appears to be the most common histologic type. On the contrary, mixed cell types of fallopian tube carcinoma have rarely been reported in the literature. A case of mixed serous and endometrioid carcinoma of the fallopian tube is presented and the related literature is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. Incidental carcinomas in prophylactic specimens in BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers, with emphasis on fallopian tube lesions: report of 6 cases and review of the literature.

    The identification of germ-line mutations in 2 genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) responsible for the majority of hereditary ovarian cancers has led an increasing number of women carriers of these mutations to undergo prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) to reduce their risk of subsequent ovarian carcinoma. A large number of unexpected, clinically occult neoplasms are thus being discovered. Up to December 2004, the Medical genetics Service of the National Cancer Institute in Milan, italy, has tested 756 probands from breast and/or ovarian cancer families for BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations. Molecular screening of family members led to the identification of 344 female carriers of BRCA1 (239) or BRCA2 (105) germ-line mutations. Of the 186 potentially eligible women (37 of whom had tested positive for BRCA1 and 13 for BRCA2 mutation), 50 (26.8%) chose to undergo PO. Six clinically occult primary gynecologic malignancies (2 stage IIIC serous carcinomas of the ovary, 3 in situ serous carcinomas of the fallopian tube, and 1 stage IIB invasive serous carcinoma of the fallopian tube) and 1 occult ovarian metastasis from breast carcinoma were identified in the PO specimens of 7 women (all BRCA1 mutated). Four of the patients with occult primary gynecologic cancers are alive without disease 129, 87, 38, and 7 months after PO, respectively. One of the 2 patients with primary ovarian cancer and the single patient with tubal invasive carcinoma are alive with recurrent disease 83 and 20 months after PO, respectively. In addition, one of the patients whose PO specimen did not show any malignancy presented with stage IIIC tubal carcinoma 77 months after PO. The relatively high number of tubal neoplasms found at PO in this group of patients underlines the linkage between mutation and the risk of developing tubal cancer, and stresses the need to include removal of the entire tubes at the time of PO and of thoroughly evaluating the specimens at the microscopic level. The upstaging of all 3 invasive carcinomas after staging surgery, and the late recurrence and persistence of 2 of them despite treatment indicate that small size of the tumors should not preclude therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. Severe prolonged gastroparesis after cytoreductive surgery in an advanced ovarian cancer patient.

    Number and type of complications after ovarian cancer surgery can vary greatly according to both the patient's characteristics, and the extension and type of surgery. Current literature lacks in mentioning specific gastrointestinal side effects, which could be evidenced during the early postoperative course of patients submitted to major gynecological oncologic surgery. A severe gastroparesis prolonged for 2 months after cytoreductive surgery in an advanced ovarian cancer patient was successfully treated with conservative multidrug therapy. gastroparesis has to be enumerated as a rare but possible event after major gynecological oncologic surgery. A conservative management involving decompressive nasogastric tube, nutritional support, antiemetic drugs, prokinetic drugs is suggested, while surgical therapy is only recommended in a very small subset of unmanageable patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. Ovarian cancer causing upper and lower urinary tract obstruction.

    BACKGROUND. Cervical cancer is the gynecologic malignancy most commonly associated with urinary tract obstruction. Ovarian cancer rarely causes this problem, but when it does, the obstruction is due to impedance of flow in the pelvic ureters. CASE REPORT. A 34 year old female treated by total abdominal hysterectomy with ovarian preservation 9 months earlier for presumed stage IV endometriosis and menorrhagia presented with a recurrent pelvic mass along with symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. Intravenous urography and computed tomography showed bilateral hydronephrosis and confirmed the bladder outlet obstruction. laparotomy revealed a large pelvic mass, grossly resembling endometriosis, obstructing the right ureter and impinging upon the urethrovesical junction. Final pathological analysis revealed a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary. CONCLUSION. urinary tract obstruction, including both urethrovesical junction and ureteral obstruction, may be caused by ovarian cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Chyloperitoneum following treatment for advanced gynecologic malignancies.

    BACKGROUND: Chyloperitoneum is an uncommon complication following retroperitoneal surgery. Blunt abdominal trauma, abdominal surgery, abdominal or pelvic radiation, cirrhosis, lymphoma, tuberculosis, and congenital defects of lacteal formation may also lead to chylous ascites. CASES: Two patients developed chylous ascites after treatment for gynecologic malignancies. One, who also received pelvic and abdominal radiation, developed chylous ascites 11 months after retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for advanced endometrial cancer. She was treated with a diet low in fat and high in medium-chain triglycerides, as well as with intravenous hyperalimentation. She had recurrences of chylous ascites, which responded to paracentesis and intravenous hyperalimentation. The second patient developed chylous ascites 2 months after retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for advanced fallopian tube cancer. She was treated with a medium-chain triglyceride diet, which resulted in resolution of her symptoms. CONCLUSION: Chyloperitoneum is an uncommon complication following treatment for gynecologic malignancies. Our second case is the first reported in which retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for gynecologic malignancy resulted in chyloperitoneum. However, because gynecologic malignancies frequently metastasize to the periaortic lymph nodes, chylous ascites may be an important cause of morbidity following treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.