Cases reported "Deafness"

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1/163. Acoustic trauma from the bone cutting burr.

    The amplitudes of the stapes footplate movements were determined in human temporal bones when the ossicular chain was drilled with a cutting and a diamond burr. High movements result in comparison to physiological data. The frequency distribution resembles the dB (A) curve. The intensity compared to sound pressure levels on the ear drum is higher than I30 dB. The pressure is constant over the period of contact between the burr and the ossicle. Most likely these unphysiologic movements of the stapes footplate can cause inner ear damage as we had to admit in a case of facial nerve decompression.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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2/163. Intraoperative loss of auditory function relieved by microvascular decompression of the cochlear nerve.

    BACKGROUND: Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are useful indicators of auditory function during posterior fossa surgery. Several potential mechanisms of injury may affect the cochlear nerve, and complete loss of BAEP is often associated with postoperative hearing loss. We report two cases of intraoperative auditory loss related to vascular compression upon the cochlear nerve. methods: Intra-operative BAEP were monitored in a consecutive series of over 300 microvascular decompressions (MVD) performed in a recent twelve-month period. In two patients undergoing treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, BAEP waveforms suddenly disappeared completely during closure of the dura. RESULTS: The cerebello-pontine angle was immediately re-explored and there was no evidence of hemorrhage or cerebellar swelling. The cochlear nerve and brainstem were inspected, and prominent vascular compression was identified in both patients. A cochlear nerve MVD resulted in immediate restoration of BAEP, and both patients recovered without hearing loss. CONCLUSION: These cases illustrate that vascular compression upon the cochlear nerve may disrupt function, and is reversible with MVD. awareness of this event and recognition of BAEP changes alert the neurosurgeon to a potential reversible cause of hearing loss during posterior fossa surgery.
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ranking = 9
keywords = nerve
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3/163. Narrow and vacant internal auditory canal.

    A case of unilateral congenital deafness revealing a narrow vacant internal auditory canal and a more anterior and superior second canal where the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves are well visualised is presented. Having reviewed the scientific and embryological data, the authors consider the mechanism of this malformation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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4/163. Auditory rehabilitation in neurofibromatosis type 2: a case for cochlear implantation.

    cochlear implantation has a limited but definite role in the rehabilitation of certain neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients. The presence of a dead ear either before, or after, tumour removal does not necessarily imply loss of function in the eighth nerve; in some instances the hearing loss will be cochlear. Promontory or round window electrical stimulation may help to identify those individuals with surviving eighth nerve function. In such patients multichannel cochlear implantation promises a better level of audition than the auditory brain stem implant. This paper highlights such a case and the management problems are discussed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
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5/163. Surgical considerations regarding cochlear implantation in the congenitally malformed cochlea.

    A 4-year-old girl with congenital profound deafness underwent cochlear implant surgery. Preoperative CT and MRI revealed that her inner ears had common-cavity or aplasia-type malformation. The bilateral internal auditory meatus were markedly narrowed. Audiometric examination demonstrated that only slight residual hearing remained in the low-frequency range and that a hearing aid would be of no benefit. cochlear implantation was performed in her left ear. Because of the abnormal position of the facial nerve, the routine facial recess approach could not be performed. A canal-wall-down mastoidectomy was performed, and multichannel cochlear implant electrodes were inserted by careful drilling of the bony wall of the semicircular canal area. All 22 electrodes were completely inserted into the cavity. The patient can perceive sounds and her hearing ability is progressively improving.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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6/163. cochlear implantation following temporal bone fracture.

    Seven cases of profound hearing impairment following either unilateral or bilateral temporal bone fracture are presented who were implanted with the Nucleus 22 channel or Ineraid devices. Six patients suffered bilateral temporal bone fractures. One patient had prior congenital unilateral profound hearing impairment. This patient suffered a unilateral temporal bone fracture. Six patients became regular users of their implants. One gained little benefit and became a non-user. Two of the regular users experienced facial nerve stimulation, which could not be programmed out. In these two cases the implant was removed and the contralateral ear successfully implanted. Implant-aided audiometry demonstrated a hearing threshold of 40-50 dB at nine months after switch-on. The reliability of computed tomography (CT) scanning in predicting cochlear patency in cases of temporal bone fracture will be discussed. The benefit of complimentary imaging with magnetic resonance (MR) is highlighted.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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7/163. The magnetless Clarion cochlear implant in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2.

    We present our experience using the Clarion magnetless multichannel cochlear implant with a woman profoundly deafened following bilateral acoustic neuromata as a consequence of neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2). The right neuroma had been previously removed without an attempt at neural preservation. On the left, however, a posterior fossa approach had been taken with the aim of preserving hearing. Although the left cochlear nerve appeared to be undamaged at the end of the operation, no hearing thresholds could be elicited on post-operative audiometry, because of damage either to the cochlear nerve or to the blood supply to the cochlea. Round window electrical stimulation subsequently produced a perception of sound, confirming that the cochlear nerve was capable of functioning and that a cochlear implant would be effective. Because she would need regular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor existing and future NF2 lesions, it was decided to use a magnetless Clarion implant, which has been shown to be MRI compatible. We report our experience of using the device in this case and discuss some of the issues related to the provision of cochlear implants to patients with NF2.
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ranking = 3
keywords = nerve
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8/163. On the association profound nerve deafness, semilobar holoprosencephaly, and minor midline developmental anomalies.

    A two-year-old boy with the combination of profound nerve deafness and semilobar holoprosencephaly associated with minor midline developmental anomalies is reported. In a review of the literature we could not find other examples of this possible syndromic association.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nerve
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9/163. Feingold syndrome--a cause of profound deafness.

    A case of Feingold syndrome is presented with a previously undescribed association of bilateral profound hearing impairment. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed severe narrowing of the internal auditory meatuses at the peripheral end with non-existent auditory nerves. This pathology is significant in the future habilitation of the child, as cochlear implantation is not possible. Children with multiple congenital anomalies should have radiological investigations before hopes are raised with respect to cochlear implantation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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10/163. Cortical reorganization after acute unilateral hearing loss traced by fMRI.

    Unilateral acoustic stimulation produces a functional MRI (fMRI)-blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) response mainly in the contralateral auditory cortex. In unilateral deaf patients, the BOLD response is bilateral. We studied a subject with sudden hearing loss after cochlear nerve resection before and repeatedly after surgery. During normal bilateral hearing, contralateral cortical BOLD responses were found. Progressing compensatory reorganization with bilateral representation of unilateral stimulation was detected over a period of approximately 1 year.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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