Cases reported "Deafness"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Case study of a deaf/blind person with a cochlear implant.

    This paper accompanies a poster presentation demonstrating outcomes after cochlear implantation of a deaf/blind person. In particular, changes in the patients voice quality and improvements in her pragmatic skills will be discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. A deaf woman learning to control her excessive vocal loudness through a portable feedback system.

    A deaf woman learned to control her excessive vocal loudness through a portable feedback system, which provided vibratory stimulation when her voice was too loud. The mean percentage of excessively loud talking decreased from 45 prior to the use of feedback to 3 during the use of feedback. This improvement (documented by formal observation) was confirmed by normally hearing people sharing the work environment with the woman. The woman preferred a system with a contact microphone since this was virtually unaffected by environmental noise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Otorhinolaringologic manifestation of smith-magenis syndrome.

    smith-magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome link to a contiguous-gene deletion syndrome, involving chromosome 1 7p 11.2,whose incidence is estimated to be 1:25,000 livebirth. SMS is characterised by a specific physical, behavioural and developmental pattern. The main clinical features consist of a broad flat midface with brachycefaly, broad nasal bridge, brachydactily, speech delay, hoarse deep voice and peripheral neuropathy. Behavioural abnormalities include hypermotility, self-mutilation and sleep disturbance. This report defines the otorhinolaryngological aspects of a new case of SMS, confirmed by cytogenetic-molecular analysis, in a 9 year old girl affected by chronic otitis media, deafness and sinusitis, who presented with typical clinical signs and symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Acquisition of lipreading in a deaf multihandicapped child.

    Operant techniques were used to develop lipreading in a nine-year-old deaf boy who had failed to respond appropriately to previous speechreading training. Remediation was initiated with two experiments: the first entailed a reversal and the second a multiple baseline. A component analysis revealed that both tokens and social reinforcers presented simultaneously or separately were effective in shaping lipreading. In addition, the child learned to lip-read either voiced or nonvoiced names of objects.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. After early identification--what follows? A study of some aspects of deaf education from an otolaryngological viewpoint.

    Otolaryngologists have accepted their role in the early diagnosis of the deaf and hard of hearing child: however, the social implications and habilitative programs embarked upon may often be regarded as unrelated to the practice of otolaryngology. The otolaryngologist is a key member of the team responsible for early detection and diagnosis, and he must become as involved with the available educational programs as are the other highly qualified competent individuals bringing expertise to the problem. The reason for emphasizing this area is that the otolaryngologist has witnessed a number of a major expansions in knowledge which have occurred in the past 15 years. These include: 1. Early identification of deafness through screening programs. 2. early diagnosis through peripheral and brain stem evoked response audiometry. 3. Improvement in amplification in hearing aids. 4. Earlier placement in educational programs, many of which have been the center of controversy, particularly in the past 15 years. 5. Emphasis on continued research and development of programs such as the Cochlear Implant. A historical review of deaf education is presented together with an evaluation of the various claims made by the supporters of the auditory-oral vs. total communication techniques. No totally convincing argument for either system can be advanced. There is considerable doubt that the tri-stimulus, or total communication approach to teaching of the deaf, has any superiority over the auditory-oral approach. There are failures with both philosophies and the "deaf voice" is a stigma often associated with either system's graduates. A 13-year follow-up case study is presented in which the child was enrolled in an auditory-oral program. Comments are made as the child was followed through home training to preschool and on to complete integration in the regular school system. The implications of such a study for the Otolaryngologist, particularly with regard to early identification in order to avoid linguistic delay, are outlined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Use of the cochlear implant by the prelingually deaf.

    Introducing sound to the prelingually deaf adult presents a special challenge to those concerned with the rehabilitation of the deaf utilizing the cochlear implant. Twelve subjects with an early loss have undergone implant surgery and have been fitted with external stimulator devices. Eight of the 12 subjects are considered successful users. Electrical thresholds are comparable to those for the postlingually deaf. However, the prelingual subjects initially have a reduced tolerance for sound and often react differently than the postlinguals. The prelinguals do not always respond to the sensation as sound, but rather as a feeling or vibration in the head. However, like the postlinguals, the prelingually deaf report being able to respond to attention-getting sounds, such as horn-honks and their names being called; and voice quality changes have been noted. These subjects find music particularly enjoyable through the implant. In addition, they have reported feeling more independent, more social, and even less lonely.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Initial experience with the cochlear implant in children.

    The decision to implant cochlear prostheses in children came after positive findings with deaf adults and the belief that the benefits of receiving sound far outweigh the potential risks involved. As of December 1981, 12 profoundly deaf children have received the single-electrode cochlear implant. Their ages range from 3.5 to 17 years. Test results are consistent with those of adults. Mean thresholds across the frequency range fall between 59-64 dB SPL. With the implant, these children can perform specific timing and intensity differentiations which could not be done with hearing aids. Their voices are quieter and more modulated, and the children are not quite as noisy with objects in the environment (eg, do not slam doors any more). This preliminary data demonstrates that implanting subjects under the age of 18 years is feasible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Musical hallucinations associated with acquired deafness.

    Two patients with auditory hallucinations beginning after a long history of progressive bilateral hearing loss were studied. The hallucinations included both unformed (tinnitus and irregular sounds of varying pitch and timbre) and formed (instrumental music, singing and voices) components, and were repetitive. They were affected by ambient noise levels; their content and speed were influenced by attentional and intentional factors. There was no evidence of global dementia, nor of epileptogenic or psychiatric disturbance. A combination of peripheral and associated central "disinhibition" may be responsible for the occurrence of such hallucinations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Hallucinatory experiences of prelingually profoundly deaf schizophrenics.

    The communication difficulties of prelingually profoundly deaf patients render psychiatric diagnosis extremely difficult. A study of 12 prelingually profoundly deaf schizophrenic patients revealed that visual hallucinations occurred in 10, and 10 also had experiences analogous to auditory hallucinations although voices may not have been heard.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Clarion cochlear implant: short-term effects on voice parameters.

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the moment-to-moment auditory control of voice at an early stage after implantation with Clarion cochlear implants. STUDY DESIGN: A perceptive and electroacoustic evaluation of the voice was carried out through a digital analysis immediately after the activation of the implant, before the fitting procedure has begun. SETTING: The study was performed at the Department of otolaryngology, University "La Sapienza" of Rome. patients: Nine profoundly deaf subjects (five post-linguistic deaf adults, two pre-linguistic deaf children and two peri-linguistic deaf subjects, one adult and one child). INTERVENTION: Surgical insertion of a Clarion cochlear device. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Qualitative (short-term pitch and energy perturbation, intonation, vocal attack, quality, and intensity) and quantitative (F0, F1, F2 and F3 frequency values), under non activated (NAI) and activated (AI) condition, have been obtained. RESULTS: In the majority of patients, the perceptive evaluation under AI showed a lowering of voice intonation, a better control of voice intensity, and a reduction of nasal quality. These findings were confirmed by a significant lowering of F0 (Wicoxon non parametric test) in all cases and lowering of F1 and F2 in five cases. Additionally, a better definition of all formats in the majority of cases as well as by a parallelism of pitch and energy profile was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The Clarion cochlear implant device provided a recognizable moment-to-moment auditory control on voice and articulatory patterns. By monitoring the articulated voice during adjustment of the electrical stimulation at the first fitting session, one may be able to include these data and assist in the selection of the best rehabilitative strategy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 10
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Deafness'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.