Cases reported "Deglutition Disorders"

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1/7. Esophageal hypermotility associated with intramural pseudodiverticulosis. Primary esophageal disease or epiphenomena?

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a very rare disease of unclear etiology. The clinical picture is characterized by progressive dysphagia. Because of its frequent association with alcohol abuse and subsequent weight loss, it must be differentiated reliably from esophageal carcinoma. The diagnosis is established by the characteristic detection of multiple intramural contrast accumulations in the barium esophagogram. Additional endoscopic and endosonographic confirmation and histological examination are required to exclude a malignant tumor. Moreover, associated diseases are almost always present and should also be diagnosed by pH-metry, cytology, and esophageal manometry. Good and long-lasting therapeutic success can be achieved by bouginage of the stenosis with concomitant treatment of the associated esophageal diseases. Based on two case reports of patients with this disease, we discuss the unusual association with esophageal hypermotility as well as the symptoms, clinical course, therapy, and pathogenesis of the disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophageal disease
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2/7. Dysphagia in a patient with a history of large B-cell lymphoma: esophageal disease with negative biopsy findings.

    A patient with a previous diagnosis of lymphoma showed signs of dysphagia. endoscopy found a lesion of the esophagus. Brush cytology and biopsy sampling were accomplished. The biopsy showed inflammation and granulation tissue but no tumor. The cytology specimen, however, was diagnostic of lymphoma. This case emphasizes the need for obtaining cytologic specimens concurrently with biopsies of esophageal lesions.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = esophageal disease
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3/7. Swallow syncope, a case report and review of the literature.

    Swallow syncope is a relatively rare syndrome that is treatable when diagnosed. A 66-year-old woman was referred to the department of cardiology because she had been suffering from recurrent syncopal attacks associated with swallowing. An ambulatory electrocardiogram revealed atrial and ventricular asystoles immediately after swallowing soup or tea that were reproducible (max. RR 3.5 s). An electrophysiological study did not detect sinus nodal or atrioventricular nodal dysfunction. The patient had no underlying esophageal disease or cardiac disorder. The patient's symptoms resolved after permanent pacemaker implantation. This report reviews the diagnosis, mechanism and management of swallow syncope.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophageal disease
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4/7. Bronchogenic carcinoma masquerading as primary esophageal disease.

    This report describes our experience with six patients with dysphagia as the sole manifestation of radiographic, inconspicuous primary lung cancer and well-defined esophageal lesion by barium swallow. Esophagograms suggested leiomyoma, benign esophageal stricture, duplication cyst, achalasia, and primary carcinoma of the esophagus. Careful evaluation of the chest radiographs in all patients presenting with dysphagia is emphasized. The majority of esophageal findings are subcarinal and bronchoscopy should be considered essential in the workup of these patients.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = esophageal disease
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5/7. Esophageal web: a previously unrecognized complication of epidermolysis bullosa.

    The course of the esophageal disease in four patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica recessive is examined. Three of four patients experienced web formation, a previously unrecognized finding, and the significance of this lesion in the evaluation and management of these patients is emphasized. One of four patients underwent a successful colonic interposition for severe esophageal disease and the role of this potentially life-saving procedure is discussed.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = esophageal disease
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6/7. Successful treatment of deglutition syncope with oral beta-adrenergic blockade.

    A case of deglutition syncope of 20 years' duration in a patient without cardiac or esophageal disease is presented. The therapeutic efficacy of beta-blockade is documented by symptomatic improvement, repeat esophageal balloon inflation and tilt-table testing. This suggests the Bezold-Jarisch reflex or sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of deglutition syncope.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophageal disease
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7/7. Late dysphagia after presternal colon interposition.

    Esophageal replacement by colon interposition is done for a variety of esophageal diseases. Dysphagia occasionally develops many years after successful colon interposition. Redundancy of the colon graft is usually responsible. We report a patient with onset of dysphagia 24 years after presternal colon interposition for long segment esophageal atresia. Pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of late colon interposition dysfunction are discussed.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophageal disease
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