Cases reported "Deglutition Disorders"

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1/92. Laparoscopic removal of an Angelchik prosthesis.

    The use of Angelchik prosthetic rings for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease has been associated with frequent complications, including dysphagia and migration, erosion, or disruption of the ring. Although reports of the laparoscopic insertion of Angelchik rings have been published, there have been no descriptions of the laparoscopic removal of rings inserted at open laparotomy. Our group recently removed an Angelchik ring laparoscopically in an 80-year-old woman with progressive, refractory dysphagia and esophageal narrowing due to an Angelchik ring originally placed in 1981 via an upper midline incision at open operation. Upper endoscopy and dilatation had failed to provide symptom relief. An extensive adhesiolysis was performed laparoscopically, and the Angelchik ring was dissected free from the proximal stomach, diaphragm, and liver. The fibrous pseudocapsule enclosing the ring was divided, and the prosthesis was removed from around the esophagus and abdominal cavity. Intraoperative upper endoscopy confirmed resolution of the esophageal stricture. There were no intraoperative complications, and the patient was discharged home on the 3rd postoperative day tolerating a regular diet. Postoperatively, she experienced resolution of her dysphagia and complained only of mild reflux symptoms, which were easily controlled with famotidine and antireflux precautions. This case suggests that laparoscopic removal of Angelchik prosthetic rings is feasible for surgeons familiar with advanced laparoscopic procedures of the esophageal hiatus and should be considered for symptomatic patients, even if the ring was inserted via an open operation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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2/92. Neuromotor disorders of the esophagus.

    Esophageal motility studies are helpful in diagnosing hypertensive and hypotensive disorders of the esophagus and its sphincters, including the exact measurement of the strength of contraction, temporal sequence and duration of the pathophysiology involved. In addition, the assessment of the extent of neuromotor involvement may be of great help to the surgeon in planning a myotomy. PH metering is probably the most accurate way to assess reflux in hypotonic states.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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3/92. doxycycline-induced esophageal ulceration in the U.S. Military service.

    U.S. military forces are frequently deployed with little warning to regions of the world where chloroquine-resistant malaria is endemic. doxycycline is often used for malaria chemoprophylaxis in these environments. The use of doxycycline can be complicated by esophageal injury. Two cases of esophageal ulceration will be discussed, followed by a review of the literature. doxycycline causes esophageal injury through a combination of drug-specific factors, the circumstances of drug administration, and individual patient conditions. patients with dysphagia attributable to esophageal ulceration are managed by intravenous fluid support and control of gastric acid reflux until their symptoms resolve over 5 to 7 days. The risk of esophageal injury can be minimized by use of fresh capsules, drug administration in the upright position well before lying down to sleep, and drinking at least 100 ml of water after swallowing the medication.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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4/92. Esophageal candidoma in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Oral thrush and esophagitis caused by candida are common in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We present the case of a 33-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who developed dysphagia during a hospitalization for pneumonia. signs and symptoms were consistent with candida esophagitis. Despite therapy with fluconazole, the patient's symptoms persisted. At upper endoscopy, a 1-cm, polypoid esophageal mass at 30 cm from the incisors and several other nodular lesions were observed; white plaques were noted throughout the esophagus. biopsy specimens of the mass contained hyphal forms consistent with candida species. Therapy with amphotericin b improved the patient's symptoms, and resolution of the mass was confirmed by repeat upper endoscopy. We believe this is the first case in the medical literature of a candida mass (candidoma) causing dysphagia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Candidoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection or immunosuppression due to other causes.
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ranking = 99.172336578292
keywords = esophagitis
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5/92. Complete dysphagia after thrombolytic treatment for myocardial infarction.

    An 82 year old man was admitted to hospital with unstable angina pectoris. There was a long history of minor symptoms suggesting reflux disease, with a small diaphragmatic hernia. One day after admission the patient complained of severe chest pain. An acute inferior-posterior myocardial infarction was diagnosed on ECG, and thrombolytic treatment with alteplase (rt-PA) was initiated. Within a few hours total dysphagia occurred, caused by haemorrhagic oesophagitis. The haematoma resolved spontaneously within about 10 days. The patient was discharged three weeks later after full resolution of the dysphagia.
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ranking = 49.919501622479
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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6/92. Esophageal lichen planus: case report and review of the literature.

    Involvement of the esophagus by lichen planus is a rarely reported condition. The histologic features of esophageal lichen planus, which may differ from those of cutaneous disease, have only rarely been illustrated. We describe a 58-year-old woman with skin and oral lichen planus who presented with dysphagia and an esophageal stricture that were ultimately diagnosed as esophageal lichen planus. Multiple esophageal biopsies demonstrated a lichenoid, T cell-rich lymphocytic infiltrate, along with degeneration of the basal epithelium and Civatte bodies. Correct diagnosis of esophageal lichen planus is critical because of its prognostic and therapeutic distinction from other more common causes of esophagitis and stricture formation.
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ranking = 49.586168289146
keywords = esophagitis
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7/92. An operation for the treatment of intractable peptic stricture of the esophagus.

    The current management of severe strictures of the esophagus resulting from reflux esophagitis is unsatisfactory. A new operation comprising esophagoplasty and intrathoracic fundoplication is described. This preliminary report records the results of this operation in 10 patients. There was one operative death. Of the nine survivors, followed for six months to three years, seven are completely free of symptoms. The remaining two have mild residual symptoms, but no dysphagia.
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ranking = 49.919501622479
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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8/92. Esophageal inflammatory pseudotumor mimicking malignancy.

    A 54-year-old man with a complaint of dysphagia was found to have a prominent stricture in the proximal esophagus. A biopsy of the stenotic area indicated sarcoma, leading to subtotal esophagectomy. The surgically removed esophagus demonstrated a well-defined intramural mass, consisting of a mixture of fibroblastic cells with bland cytological appearances and inflammatory cells. Reflux esophagitis which was present distal to the stricture seemed to play a role in the development of this inflammatory pseudotumor.
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ranking = 49.586168289146
keywords = esophagitis
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9/92. Spindle cell lipoma of the hypopharynx.

    larynx and hypopharynx lipomas are reported to account for approximately 0.6% of benign laryngeal neoplasms. Spindle cell lipoma is a histologically distinct variant characterized by mature adipocytes mixed with collagen-forming spindle cells; only one case of spindle cell lipoma of the larynx has been previously reported. We here describe a new case of spindle cell lipoma of the pyriform sinus successfully treated by means of endoscopic surgical excision. A 77-year-old woman with a 40-year history of dysphagia reported that the condition had markedly worsened over the three years before she came to us. She had difficulty swallowing even semisolid food and she experienced occasional nasal regurgitation of liquid or solid food. Flexible videolaryngoscopy showed a very large mass, covered by normal mucosa that almost totally occupied the right pyriform sinus and was apparently attached to the right arytenoid. Functional endoscopic study and videofluoroscopy of swallowing showed that the bolus progressed exclusively in the left pyriform sinus, with postdeglutitory pooling in the right pyriform sinus and a reflux toward the valleculae during consecutive deglutitions. Computed tomography demonstrated that the hypopharyngeal mass had low attenuation values and negative densitometry. The entire mass was surgically removed during suspension microlaryngoscopy. The histological sections showed mature adipocytes mixed with small and slender spindle cells. Postoperative endoscopic and videofluorosocpic deglutition studies revealed the recovery of normal swallowing. This case indicates that hypopharyngeal lipomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of slowly occurring swallowing impairments.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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10/92. Vagal neuropathy after upper respiratory infection: a viral etiology?

    PURPOSE: To describe a condition that occurs following an upper respiratory illness, which represents injury to various branches of the vagus nerve. patients with this condition may present with breathy dysphonia, vocal fatigue, effortful phonation, odynophonia, cough, globus, and/or dysphagia, lasting long after resolution of the acute viral illness. The patterns of symptoms and findings in this condition are consistent with the hypothesis that viral infection causes or triggers vagal dysfunction. This so-called postviral vagal neuropathy (PVVN) appears to have similarities with other postviral neuropathic disorders, such as glossopharyngeal neuralgia and Bell's palsy. MATERIALS AND methods: Five patients were identified with PVVN. Each patient's chart was reviewed, and elements of the history were recorded. RESULTS: Each of the 5 patients showed different features of PVVN. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory infection can trigger or cause vocal fold paresis, laryngopharyngeal reflux, and neuropathic pain.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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