Cases reported "Deglutition Disorders"

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1/22. Ortner's syndrome in association with mitral valve prolapse.

    The case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of hypertension, valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, and cardiomegaly is presented. The patient also had progressive hoarseness of her voice and intermittent dysphagia. Ear, nose, and throat examination revealed left vocal cord paralysis. echocardiography revealed severely dilated left (LA) and right atria (RA), moderate mitral regurgitation, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and prolapse of both these valves. A review of literature of Ortner's or cardiovocal syndrome is presented. Ortner's syndrome due to mitral valve prolapse has not been reported previously.
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2/22. Upper sternal cleft associated with unusual symptoms.

    We report a rare case of upper sternal cleft in a 20-year-old adult with associated unusual symptoms such as dysphagia, restricted lingual movements and a voice problem. The strap muscles causing unusual symptoms were divided from their abnormal insertion site on the lower edge of the cleft. Direct complete closure without compromising the cardiac function was achieved in this patient.
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3/22. Tracheo-tracheal puncture for voice rehabilitation after laryngotracheal separation.

    For patients with intractable aspiration, laryngotracheal separation (LTS) may be the only means of protecting the airway. The LTS prevents pulmonary compromise caused by aspiration; however, airway separation from the larynx also prevents laryngeal phonation. This case report suggests a supplemental procedure to the LTS, which maintains airway protection yet allows for laryngeal communication.
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4/22. Cervical osteophytes presenting as unilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia.

    Any process involving either the vagus nerve, its recurrent laryngeal branch or the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve may cause paralysis of the vocal fold. The most common cause is neoplasm. Clinically, the patients often present with a hoarse, breathy voice as well as symptoms of aspiration. The following represents a unique case of unilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia caused by a degenerative disease of the cervical spine, resluting in extrinsic compression of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.
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5/22. CT findings associated with Eagle syndrome.

    Eagle syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms caused by an elongated ossified styloid process, the cause of which remains unclear. This is a rare finding that often goes undetected in the absence of radiographic studies. In this case, we present the diagnostic CT and lateral view plain film radiography findings of a 39-year-old woman with clinical evidence of Eagle syndrome. Eagle syndrome can occur unilaterally or bilaterally and most frequently results in symptoms of dysphagia, headache, pain on rotation of the neck, pain on extension of the tongue, change in voice, and a sensation of hypersalivation (1, 2). We present rare and diagnostic radiographic evidence of this on both plain film radiographs and CT scans. Although well documented in otolaryngology literature and dentistry literature, this syndrome has not been reported in the radiology literature.
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6/22. Laryngopharyngeal dysfunction from the implant vagal nerve stimulator.

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The objective of the study was to examine the side-effect profile of the vagal nerve stimulator. Vagal nerve stimulators have been used to treat intractable seizures in all age groups. They provide relief to the patient with a seizure disorder by decreasing the overall number and severity of seizure activities. Although significant complications are rare, many patients have some complaint, usually of their voice. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective evaluation of four patients with intractable epilepsy. methods: Evaluation of charts and medical records and endoscopic examination of the larynx. RESULTS: In this small series, all four patients had implantation-related paresis. Three of the four appear to have side effects from device activation. CONCLUSIONS: patients in whom a vagal nerve stimulator is placed can have adverse side effects. These can be related to the surgical manipulation of the vagus nerve, resulting in a temporary paresis of the vocal folds. A second set of side effects is related to the actual electrical stimulation of the device, and these side effects can directly affect the laryngeal musculature.
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7/22. Functional treatment of a large laryngeal chondrosarcoma by tracheal autotransplantation.

    chondrosarcoma of the cricoid cartilage poses difficult therapeutic challenges. The tumor necessitates resection of parts of the cricoid cartilage with a resulting defect that is difficult to repair. We wanted to improve the functional outcome after resection of a lateralized chondrosarcoma by applying the technique of tracheal autotransplantation. The technique involves a 2-stage procedure, because the trachea needs at least 2 weeks for revascularization. Tracheal revascularization is the first stage, and is accomplished by wrapping the trachea in vascularized fascia (radial forearm). The second stage, performed after 14 days, consists of a hemilaryngectomy with tracheal autotransplantation. A case of a large unilateral chondrosarcoma of the cricoid cartilage with involvement of 1 cricoarytenoid joint is reported. The tumor was removed by hemicricohemilaryngectomy. After 2 weeks of tracheal revascularization, the cervical trachea was used to repair the laryngeal defect. The tumor was completely resected, and all laryngeal functions (swallowing, voice, respiration without tracheostomy) were restored. The patient remains tumor-free after a follow-up period of 3 years. Tracheal autotransplantation improves the functional treatment of lateralized chondrosarcomas of the cricoid cartilage.
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8/22. Malignant granular cell tumor in larynx mimicking laryngeal carcinoma.

    A 72-year-old man presented to our clinic with progressed husky voice, dysphagia and globus pharyngeus. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed a large subglottic mass with an irregular surface. A chest roentgenogram revealed multiple nodules over the right upper and lower lobes. Under the impression of malignant laryngeal tumor with lung metastasis, he underwent direct laryngeal biopsy and excision. Pathologic findings showed malignant granular cell tumor. Postoperative palliative chemotherapy was done for his lung metastasis. The multiple pulmonary nodules were decreased in size and number but not complete remission. The laryngeal tumor has not recurred after a 14-month follow-up.
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9/22. Reversal of laryngotracheal separation: a detailed case report with long-term followup.

    Chronic aspiration is a difficult and potentially lethal problem. patients who have persistent soilage of the upper respiratory tract despite discontinuing oral intake may be offered surgical intervention to avoid life-threatening pulmonary infections. The Lindeman procedures (tracheoesophageal diversion and laryngotracheal separation) have gained popularity as surgical treatments for intractable aspiration because of their efficacy in preventing aspiration and their technical simplicity. A major downside of these procedures is the necessity for a tracheostoma and the loss of speech following surgery. Rarely, patients recover from the neurologic deficits which led to their intractable aspiration and desire reversal of their Lindeman procedure. While few "successful" reversals have been reported, detailed accounts of the long-term results of such patients are lacking. We describe a patient who underwent a laryngotracheal separation for intractable aspiration following a brainstem stroke. In the following six months he experienced significant neurologic recovery and, after careful evaluation, underwent surgical restoration of laryngotracheal continuity. Five years later he speaks fluently and has no dietary restrictions. Videofluooroscopic examination and quantitative voice analysis reveal near-normal laryngeal function.
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10/22. Choking, sore throat with referred otalgia and dysphagia in a patient with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

    A patient with a progressively increasing immobilisation of the cervical spine, severe impaired swallowing (choking), sore throat with referred right-sided otalgia, mild voice disorder and dysphagia due to extrinsic bone compression of the posterior hypopharyngeal wall and oesophagus is presented. Radiographic investigation demonstrated the underlying condition to be a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with prominent and bumpy alteration of the anterior longitudinal ligament impinging the hypopharynx. Via an anterolateral approach towards the cervical spine the anterior irregular part of the ossification was removed and the surface of the spine flattened. The postoperative evolution was uneventful.
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