Cases reported "Dental Calculus"

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1/12. An unusual case of a relationship between rosacea and dental foci.

    rosacea is a chronic disorder affecting the facial convexities, characterized by frequent flushing, persistent erythema, and telangiectases. During episodes of inflammation, additional features are swelling, papules, and pustules. The exact etiology of this dermatitis is unknown, and theories abound. Infectious foci, especially dental foci, seem to be rarely associated with the onset and progression of this disease. Dermatologic treatments are determined by the severity of the disease. But eradication of infectious foci, and in this case eradication of dental foci, may generate a significant improvement and may lead to a recovery.
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2/12. Dental findings in Lowe syndrome.

    This paper presents the dental findings of a child with the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe. The genetic abnormality in this condition results in an inborn error of inositol phosphate metabolism. Renal tubular dysfunction leads to metabolic acidosis and phosphaturia. At 4 years, generalised mobility of all primary teeth was noted. It is postulated that a defective inositol phosphate metabolism was responsible for the periodontal pathology found in this case. This is in direct contrast with previous reports of prolonged retention of primary teeth in children with this condition. histology of extracted primary incisors demonstrated enlarged pulp chambers and mildly dysplastic dentin formation. This is consistent with a chronic subrachitic state, a known feature of Lowe syndrome, but no prominent interglobular dentin was present.
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keywords = dental
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3/12. Oral midazolam for adults with learning disabilities.

    This paper demonstrates how oral midazolam can be employed as an alternative method of behaviour management to general anaesthesia for the dental treatment of people with learning disabilities. A range of treatments, from scaling to root canal therapy, can be carried out successfully using the sedation technique outlined. The advantages of sedation include reduced morbidity and mortality. Treatment outcomes are also likely to be improved as root canal therapy and periodontal care can be carried out over a number of visits rather than a single treatment session under general anaesthesia. Oral sedation with midazolam should improve the scope of dental treatment available to patients with disabilities.
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keywords = dental
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4/12. Pathologic migration--spontaneous correction following periodontal therapy: a case report.

    Periodontal disease is often associated with pathologic migration, which becomes an esthetic concern. A 17-year-old girl developed increasing gaps among her maxillary incisors. She had gingival enlargement in the palatal maxillary anterior region. The central incisors had pathologically migrated, resulting in a 2-mm diastema. Periodontal treatment was planned and completed. Following periodontal treatment, there was "spontaneous" repositioning of the central incisors. The 6-month follow-up revealed no change or deterioration of the periodontal condition. The patient was referred for orthodontic closure of the remaining diastema between the central and lateral incisors.
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ranking = 0.099599064460735
keywords = gingival
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5/12. Periodontal plastic surgical technique for gingival fenestration closure.

    Gingival fenestration is an opening through oral keratinized tissue, usually unattached, that is observed in thin gingiva with usually thick subgingival calculus deposits. This lesion is seen infrequently but may be more common than has been reported; lack of symptoms may inhibit patient awareness. Because surgical correction usually is not required, there are very few reports in the literature concerning this lesion. The following report describes a case of gingival fenestration and surgical treatment with a connective tissue/periosteal graft.
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ranking = 0.59759438676441
keywords = gingival
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6/12. Rare and abnormal massive dental calculus deposit: an investigative report.

    An unprecedented case is presented involving a massive calculus buildup on the mandibular incisors. The clinical and radiographic findings were reviewed, probable causes were investigated, and results were outlined and discussed. The composition, origin, and formation of dental calculus and its interrelationship with dental plaque and saliva were highlighted. The role of dental calculus in the pathogenicity of periodontal diseases, in view of epidemiological data, research, and clinical study findings, is discussed. Both the case management and the benefit of total calculus removal for resolving periodontal disease are underlined.
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keywords = dental
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7/12. Takayasu's arteritis: what should the dentist know?

    Takayasu's arteritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects large blood vessels, especially the aorta and/or its major branches. The condition presents with segmental lesions adjacent to normal, apparently unaffected, areas. The lesions include stenosis, occlusion, dilatations or aneurysm formations along the path of the affected artery. Because of the severity of the disease and the possibility of cardiovascular complications, patients with Takayasu's arteritis require medical treatment based on immunosuppressive and antihypertensive drugs, as well as regular follow up and surgical intervention in many instances. The aim of this paper was to describe the characteristics of Takayasu's arteritis, to report dental treatment carried out on an affected patient, and to discuss the main implications and care required during routine treatment for children in the dental office.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = dental
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8/12. Unusual radiographic presentations. Report of five cases.

    Five examples of radiographic oddities, culled from the records of private dental practitioners, are presented. Two cases feature radiographic manifestations of systemic disease, and three cases display anomalous oral findings. Each illustration is furnished with a short narrative and interpretation.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = dental
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9/12. nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. Report of a case treated by controlling plaque.

    A review of the literature reveals little evidence that controlling plaque reduces and controls nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. The case presented suggests that significant reduction and control of nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth can be achieved by thorough scaling and root planing along with meticulous plaque control.
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ranking = 0.59759438676441
keywords = gingival
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10/12. Generalized juvenile periodontitis in a thirteen-year-old child.

    There have been two previous cases reported in which children with a possible history of Prepubertal periodontitis (PP) developed Generalized Juvenile periodontitis (GJP) in their permanent dentitions at circumpubescent ages. This paper reports a case in which an apparently healthy 13-year-old girl, whose radiographs at 6 1/2 years of age showed horizontal bone loss around the primary molars, developed GJP. Blood tests (CBC, WBC differential, fasting glucose level, serum alkaline phosphatase) and a gingival biopsy were performed to exclude possible systemic diseases that might have been associated with alveolar bone resorption. Neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis (CX) and adhesion molecule CD11b levels were also examined. The results of these tests were all within the normal range. This case report illustrates that an apparently healthy patient with PP may develop advanced periodontitis at a circumpubescent age.
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ranking = 0.099599064460735
keywords = gingival
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