Cases reported "Dental Caries"

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1/10. Epidermolysis bullosa and associated problems in oral surgical treatment.

    The problems encountered in the anesthetic and oral surgical management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa are many and varied and are always challenging. Two patients with the disease, from the same family, underwent complete odontectomies. Exacerbation of the disease was prevented by hospitalization with meticulous preparation and exacting postoperative care. This is the first report in the dental literature of complete odontectomies performed on two afficted patients from one family.
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ranking = 1
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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2/10. Clinical evaluation of patients with epidermolysis bullosa: review of the literature and case reports.

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a relatively rare inherited disorder, which includes blister and vesicle formation on the skin and mucous membranes as a result of trauma or heat. There are different forms of this disorder. Mild manifestations are relatively uncomfortable, usually involving the knees, elbows, and fingers. Severe forms of this disease compromise normal functioning of multiple organs, which may result in premature death. The lack of a specific treatment to cure EB makes genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of primary importance to control this disorder. Three case histories of persons with dystrophic recessive epidermolysis bullosa are reported, focusing on appropriate dental care for patients with EB.
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ranking = 4.1134520558341
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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3/10. Oral-clinical findings and management of epidermolysis bullosa.

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a diverse group of disorders that have as a common feature blister formation with tissue occuring at variable depths in the skin and/or mucosa. This article reports two cases of EB and review oral-clinical findings of the EB types and approaches for managing the oral-clinical manifestations. While systemic treatment remains primarily palliative, it is possible to prevent destruction and subsequent loss of the dentition through appropriate interventions and dental therapy.
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ranking = 3.3000937282901
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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4/10. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: oral findings and problems.

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is one of the three major types of epidermolysis bullosa (EB), an inherited cutaneous disease with blister formation following minor trauma. A subtype of DEB is recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Hallopeau-Siemens type (RDEB-HS), where marked scarring leads to deformities of extremities. In RDEB-HS the mucous membranes may also be involved and form adhesions with ankyloglossia and microstomia. oral hygiene is difficult. A 7-year-old boy with RDEB-HS was brought to the Johannes Gutenberg University dental clinic with dental pain. He had multiple carious lesions, poor oral hygiene and gingivitis. Because he was noncompliant and had microstomia, he required dental therapy under general anesthesia. The recall visits over the past two years had demonstrated that the dental health of this patient with RDEB-HS could be maintained by means of improved oral home care, using antibacterial agents.
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ranking = 5.6935082928082
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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5/10. dental care of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous diseases: case reports and literature review.

    Dental management of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders is complicated because of prominent involvement of oral mucosa, increased risk of oral disease, and difficulty in rendering dental care. Although these diseases are relatively uncommon, dental practitioners should be familiar with the oral sequelae of these conditions and their management. pemphigus vulgaris, cicatricial pemphigoid, and epidermolysis bullosa represent the most common autoimmune oral vesiculobullous diseases. This case-illustrated review summarizes the pathogenesis, diagnostic features, and natural history of oral vesiculobullous disorders, placing an emphasis on the treatment and prevention of associated oral disease aimed at maintaining a healthy, functional dentition.
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ranking = 0.81335832754402
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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6/10. Combined medical-dental treatment of an epidermolysis bullosa patient.

    Epidermolysis bullosa presents a wide range of clinical symptoms. In this case, a patient had recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa that required dental treatment. Standard protocol modifications and medical considerations were required in preparation for general anesthesia. Postoperative follow-up, including monitoring the relationship of the patient's disease state to dental health, is recommended.
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ranking = 4.1134520558341
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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7/10. epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica polydysplastica. A case of anesthetic management in oral surgery.

    epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica is a rare disease that affects the skin and mucous membranes. Manifest at birth, it is characterized by poor dentition, esophageal strictures, syndactyly, and severe chronic anemia. Our 12-year-old patient required extensive dental treatment which necessitated overcoming problems of anesthesia as well as developing a technique of management that provided maximum safety and a minimum of discomfort. Transmission electron microscopy of sections of the gingiva revealed possible degenerative collagen fibers and an interrupted basement membrance. Anchoring fibrils normally found in the connective tissue beneath the epithelium were absent.
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ranking = 0.23330209056997
keywords = bullosa
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8/10. Epidermolysis bullosa: a case report.

    The term epidermolysis bullosa describes a group of rare genetic mechanicobullous disorders. The disease has several modes of inheritance with various degrees of severity and expression. A patient with simplex epidermolysis bullosa had typical cutaneous lesions and dental involvement. The teeth were severely affected by hypoplasia. Dental therapy consisted of placement of amalgam restorations and topical applications of fluoride. The need for, and advantages of, early preventive and restorative dental care are illustrated by the case presented.
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ranking = 1.813358327544
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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9/10. Oral epidermolysis bullosa in adults.

    A rare case of epidermolysis bullosa in an adult is reported and the English-language dental literature of the last 20 years is reviewed. Special dental management is suggested. Early detection because of potential malignant transformation is discussed.
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ranking = 4.0667916377201
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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10/10. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Two case reports with 20-year follow-up.

    These two case reports highlight the enormous clinical difficulties faced by dentists in providing satisfactory long-term dental care to patients who suffer from Epidermolysis bullosa. Problems of bullae formation in oral soft tissues and subsequent scarring are outlined in relation to the difficulty of maintaining satisfactory oral hygiene and a diet leading to minimal dental caries experience. The behavioural problems of maintaining patient compliance for preventive and restorative dentistry in this painful and debilitating disease are illustrated in these case reports. Difficulties in providing restorative care, either under local anaesthesia or general anaesthesia are discussed, and a novel replacement of non-viable carious anterior teeth using a nine-unit porcelain fused to metal Rochette type bridge is presented. Dental management of patients with Epidermolysis bullosa should commence at birth, and non-compliance in dental attendances should be followed up by social workers to prevent the disastrous oral morbidity that frequently occurs in such patients.
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ranking = 3.3467541464041
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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