Cases reported "Dental Fistula"

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1/61. diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous facial sinus tracts of dental origin.

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous draining sinus tracts of dental origin often are a diagnostic challenge. A delay in correctly diagnosing these types of lesions can result in ineffective and inappropriate treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present five cases of facial lesions that were initially misdiagnosed as lesions of nonodontogenic origin. The correct diagnosis in each case was cutaneous sinus tract secondary to pulpal necrosis and suppurative apical periodontitis. All facial sinus tracts resolved after the patients received nonsurgical root canal therapy. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: As patients with cutaneous facial sinus tracts of dental origin often do not have obvious dental symptoms, possible dental etiology may be overlooked. Early correct diagnosis and treatment of these lesions can help prevent unnecessary and ineffective antibiotic therapy or surgical treatment.
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keywords = dental
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2/61. Management of an avulsed primary incisor.

    The case describes the management of an avulsed maxillary central primary incisor of a 3 1/2-year-old girl. The tooth was retained in the oral cavity for 30 min. After replantation it was splinted for 17 days. At day 11 the root canal was completely instrumented and obturated with a calcium hydroxide paste. The 1-year follow-up documented no pathologic clinical or radiographic findings. One and a half years after the trauma the tooth was extracted since a fistula and extensive external inflammatory resorption had developed. The permanent successor erupted along with its neighboring central incisor without any complications 6 months later. Conventional approaches for treating avulsed permanent teeth could also be applied to avulsed primary incisors to preserve them for a certain period without the additional risk of damaging their developing permanent successors.
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ranking = 0.035718224352692
keywords = fistula
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3/61. Median mental sinus in twins.

    Sinus on the chin can be the result of a chronic apical abscess due to pulp necrosis of a mandibular anterior tooth. The tooth is usually asymptomatic, and a dental cause is therefore not apparent to the patient or the unsuspecting clinician. Not infrequently, the patient may seek treatment from a dermatologist or general surgeon instead of a dentist. Excision and repair of the fistula may be carried out with subsequent breakdown because the dental pathology is not removed. This paper reports the presence of median mental sinus of dental origin in twins. One case healed following root canal therapy while the other required both root canal therapy and surgery to eliminate the infection.
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ranking = 0.41071822435269
keywords = dental, fistula
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4/61. The dental management of a patient with a cocaine-induced maxillofacial defect: a case report.

    There are several dental complications associated with cocaine abuse, including adverse reactions to dental anesthetics, post-operative bleeding, and cellulitis, which can lead to necrosis of orbital, nasal, and palatal bones. Following is a report of the initial treatment rendered to a patient who had destroyed most of her hard palate over a ten-year period of cocaine abuse. There are no classic socio-economic or educational profiles for abusers of cocaine. Drug abuse victims may present as patients in any dental office. Though there are certain classic physiological and psychological symptoms of their condition, they may not display symptoms at all.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = dental
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5/61. Lateral breakdown of nonendodontic origin adjacent to maxillary left incisors.

    CASE REPORT: A 16-year-old female presented with a labial fistula located between the central and lateral left maxillary incisors. The teeth had normal colour, responded positively to pulp testing, demonstrated negative percussion tests and had no evidence of periodontal pockets. The patient reported no history of trauma, but mentioned that she had received orthodontic treatment. Radiographic examination showed bone loss between these two teeth. Explorative surgery followed by antibiotic treatment was performed, but a fistula reappeared after 22 months. Surgical retreatment combined with antibiotic treatment resulted in gradual healing over a three-year period. No root canal treatment was performed. Aetiological considerations connected to tissue injury and inflammation are discussed. inflammation induced disturbances in local homeostasis may possibly explain the lateral breakdown of bone. Such areas of reduced resistance may, under unfavourable conditions, be infected by blood-born pathogens. Information about such aberrant cases is important in endodontic decision making.
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ranking = 0.071436448705383
keywords = fistula
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6/61. Garre's osteomyelitis of an unusual origin in a 8-year-old child. A case report.

    Garre's osteomyelitis is a type of chronic osteomyelitis that primarily affects children and adolescents. Although the disease is well described in the dental literature and is usually associated with an odontogenic infection resulting from caries, a number of other causative factors have been occasionally reported, such as a dental extraction or a mild periodontitis. There have also been cases of unknown aetiology. This paper describes a case of Garre's osteomyelitis in an 8-year-old child, in whom the condition arose following a local periodontal infection in an ectopically erupting first permanent molar that was in infraocclusion. The lesion remained unresolved for a period of over 6 months as a result of misdiagnosis, following a number of unsuccessful treatment attempts. Identification of the true cause and treatment through periodontal surgery resulted in lesion resolution and resolved the diagnostic problem. dentists should be aware that the periodontium may be a potential source of infection for Garre's osteomyelitis in children, particularly in the presence of ectopically erupting posterior teeth. In such cases, periodontal treatment should be sufficient to treat the disease and extraction of the tooth involved may not be necessary.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = dental
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7/61. Cutaneous sinus tract from remaining tooth fragment of edentulous maxilla.

    Cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin usually arises from chronic dental infections. These tracts usually appear as suppurative lesions of the chin or neck. Because many patients with this lesion do not have any complaints of oral symptoms, these lesions are often diagnosed incorrectly and overlooked, and are also treated ineffectively. A case of an unusual presentation of a chronic suppurative granuloma on nasolabial fold, which originated from the remaining tooth fragment of edentulous maxilla, is reported. Treatment with removal of the tooth fragment as well as the sinus tract resulted in complete healing of the lesion. This report emphasizes the importance of awareness of the possible dental origin of facial sinuses, despite their unusual location.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = dental
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8/61. The implant periapical lesion: four case reports and review of the literature.

    postoperative complications have been identified with implant failure in conjunction with the increased use of root-type implant restorations. The failure of osseointegrated dental implants primarily occurs as a result of peri-implantitis and occlusal overload. Less frequently reported failures, however, have been attributed to implant periapical lesions. The etiology and treatment modalities for such lesions have been speculated throughout the literature. This article discusses possible etiologies of and treatment for implant periapical lesions based on the existing literature and four case reports.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = dental
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9/61. Treatment of middle-apical level root fracture in necrotic teeth.

    The purpose of this paper is to present two case reports of dental trauma with middle-apical level root fractures and pulp necrosis. The treatment consisted of programmed applications of calcium hydroxide until a calcified barrier was formed at the fracture level. The technique presented here proved efficient in treating horizontal fractures at the middle and apical thirds of the root.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = dental
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10/61. Treatment of cariously involved fused maxillary primary lateral and central incisors.

    A 3-and-a-half-year-old male child presented with fused cariously involved right maxillary primary central and lateral incisors as well as a previously traumatized non-vital left primary central incisor with a draining fistula. The child also had other restorative needs and the decision taken was to address all needs under a G.A. With respect to the fused incisors, these were split and root canals treatment was performed for all three incisors which were then restored with stainless steel crowns with esthetic facings.
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ranking = 0.035718224352692
keywords = fistula
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