Cases reported "Dental Leakage"

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1/6. Clinical response to a vacant post space.

    AIM: To report a case demonstrating a radiolucency of developing adjacent to an unfilled post space. SUMMARY: A mandibular left first molar was root filled before post-space preparation. The tooth was restored coronally but the post space was left empty, and 14 months later, pain and furcal radiolucency developed. Cleaning, shaping, medicating and filling the post space resulted in the resolution of symptoms and healing of the radiolucency. KEY learning POINTS: Post space should be prepared under conditions of asepsis. A post space must not be allowed to remain empty when a tooth is restored.
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2/6. Dental fractures on acute exposure to high altitude.

    There is little in the literature on dental restoration breakage in the aviation environment since reports of problems in combat aviators in war World II. We report two cases of dental fractures during acute exposure to a hypobaric environment. Case 1 was a young officer who suffered an amalgam restoration breakage during a 25,000-ft decompression chamber simulation. Case 2 occurred in an experienced aviator who had a tooth cusp fracture in a molar with a defective amalgam restoration during an unpressurized helicopter flight to 18,000 ft. In both cases, after removing the defective fillings, deep secondary caries were found; both teeth were successfully restored. Because hard-tissue tooth fracture during a high-altitude flight is a rare event, few flight surgeons or dentists are familiar with this phenomenon. We recommend regular dental examinations with careful assessment of previous dental restorations in aircrew subject to decompression.
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3/6. Coronal leakage and treatment failure.

    This report presents a case in which undiagnosed coronal leakage resulted in failure in the endodontic management of a tooth. Coronal leakage occurred during root canal treatment as a result of the presence of deficient composite resin fillings and secondary caries. Despite repeated visits of cleaning and dressing, the canal continued to be contaminated and symptoms persisted. On referral, the reason for treatment failure was diagnosed. The tooth was successfully treated by the replacement of the deficient fillings, after the elimination of underlying caries. Symptoms resolved enabling the completion of the root canal treatment.
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4/6. Multidisciplinary aspects of root resection failure: a case report.

    Creative approaches to tooth maintenance often include tooth resection and retention of one or more of the roots. Although this procedure is reasonably successful, failure of supportive endodontic, periodontic, and restorative management of the retained roots can jeopardize a successful outcome. The following is a case report evaluating multiple aetiologies contributing to root resection failure.
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5/6. Implant pathology associated with loss of periapical seal of adjacent tooth: clinical report.

    A mandibular cuspid adjacent to two implants placed in the incisor region redeveloped periapical pathosis as a result of the inadvertent removal of the gutta-percha seal during post preparation. The root end inflammatory process communicated with the surface of an adjacent implant, resulting in endodontic-implant pathosis and subsequent removal of the implant. The osteotomy site healed uneventfully and almost complete osseous repair was observed after five months.
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6/6. Degradation of a silver point in association with endodontic infection.

    This paper describes an unusual clinical report of degradation of an endodontic silver point within the root canal of a lower right first premolar. Its apical portion was found to be degrading and at one stage a small portion became separated from its main body and was displaced apically. The tooth, despite past apical surgery, displayed signs of endodontic failure. Conventional retreatment and removal of the silver point improved the endodontic problems associated with this tooth. The silver point was analysed using both scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalyses. These tests revealed that the silver point had deteriorated significantly with a surface coating of a silver-chloride salt. Microleakage with infection and galvanic reaction are possible hypotheses as to the reason for the degradation of the silver point. Although other reports have demonstrated corrosion of silver points, this method of presentation appears unique.
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