Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Form follows function: occlusion based rationale for esthetic dentistry.

    Esthetic dentistry is one of the prime essential areas in dentistry today. The purpose of this article is to address the dependent relationship between excellent esthetics and optimum occlusion. Occlusal objectives must be addressed and achieved. If one is to expect to recreate ideal esthetics, one must first thoroughly investigate, diagnose, and establish an ideal occlusal scheme. The case study within this article revisits the most imperative principle with regards to esthetics and that is: form always follows function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = dentistry
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Restoring esthetics and anterior guidance in worn anterior teeth. A conservative multidisciplinary approach.

    BACKGROUND: Developments in adhesive dentistry have given the dental profession new restorative materials and technology to restore esthetics and function to the worn anterior dentition. This article illustrates, through a clinical case study, the clinical requirements for restoring esthetic harmony and functional stability to the worn anterior dentition. CASE DESCRIPTION: The author presents the case of a 24-year-old man who sought esthetic dental treatment because he was unhappy with the appearance of his maxillary anterior teeth. The review of his dental history revealed that he ground his teeth at night. The author performed a complete evaluation of the causes of the patient's bruxism and created a diagnostic preview to, among other things, develop the relationship between the condylar and anterior guidance and to establish the esthetic requirements for the final restorations. Treatment included periodontal recontouring, tooth preparation and placement of temporary and then permanent restorations; the patient also was given an occlusal guard to protect the restorations against future bruxing. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Whatever the cause of occlusal instability, it is important that the restorative dentist be able to recognize its signs--such as tooth hypermobility, tooth wear, periodontal breakdown, occlusal dimpling, stress fractures, exostosis, muscle enlargement and loss of posterior disclusion. When restoring the worn dentition, the clinician should bear in mind the five P's: proper planning prevents poor performance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = dentistry
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Smile lifts - a functional and aesthetic perspective.

    Cosmetic dentistry has evolved with the advent of more robust porcelain materials and ever-stronger bonding agents. This series of three articles aims to provide a practical overview of what is now possible both functionally and cosmetically from the preparation of a small number of teeth, through a whole smile, to full mouth rehabilitation. A complete diagnosis is the starting point to planning any cosmetic or functional changes. Guidance is given on the techniques used but adequate training must be considered essential before embarking upon modification in occlusal schemes or even minor adjustments in smile design. Porcelain laminate veneers have a role in the restoration and rehabilitation of a wearing and functionally compromised dentition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = dentistry
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. Thielemann's diagonal law of occlusion revisited.

    Thielemann's studies of malocclusal relationships and the frequently observed chain reactions created in distant localities led to the formulation of a philosophical approach to occlusion that is also of practical premeditative clinical relevance for the practitioner. Dr. Thielemann presumed to name it a law, and repeated clinical observations apparently support and reinforce his claim. All disciplines of dentistry inevitably encounter and need to know about this aspect of fission-reactive involvement with the common and seemingly innocuous malocclusions. By incorporating the law into the diagnostic, planning, corrective, and therapeutic stages of treatment, the clinician can readily categorize patients for needs assessments and future goals in treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = dentistry
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Full arch rehabilitation of the intact worn dentition: a case report.

    When evaluating the worn intact dentition, there are instances when supervised monitoring and piecemeal restoration is the only treatment required. In other cases, especially those which do not fit the stereotype of the aging dentition, full corrective dentistry should be the treatment option. The challenge of reestablishing the vertical dimension of occlusion has frequently evoked the response of "let well enough alone." The objective of this case report is to present the author's solution to some of the challenges which typically create obstacles for general practitioners during full arch rehabilitation. It is by no means complete in theory or clinical protocol and, as with any data from single case reports, should be read as such.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = dentistry
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Dental Occlusion, Traumatic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.