Cases reported "Dental Pulp Calcification"

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1/20. Dentinal dysplasia type I: report of a case.

    A case of dentinal dysplasia type I is presented. This rare hereditary disturbance of dentine is characterized by short-rooted teeth with sharp conical apical constrictions, aberrant growth of dentine in the pulp chamber leading to reduced pulp space in permanent teeth and total pulpal obliteration in the primary dentition. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological material from a 7-year-old boy, showing the typical features of this disorder in which teeth are prematurely lost through periapical abscesses, cysts or spontaneous exfoliation, is described. A review of the theories of pathogenesis of this condition is included. Management of patients with dentinal dysplasia is difficult and a discussion of the shortcomings of various treatment strategies, including conventional endodontic therapy, periapical curettage and retrograde root filling, and a preventive regimen, are discussed. In this case, despite diagnosis being made at an early age and the provision of regular dental care, the patient is now losing teeth because of spontaneous abscess formation.
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keywords = dental
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2/20. Combined treatment of a large periodontal defect using GTR and DFDBA.

    The regeneration of periodontal structures lost to inflammatory disease is an elusive yet attainable goal of periodontal therapy. This article reports the successful treatment of a large periodontal defect using a combination of demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR). The case presents endodontic and mucogingival complications in the combined GTR osseous graft technique. The combined techniques used in this 27-year-old patient achieved a reduction in probing depth, radiographic evidence of bone fill, and a reduction in clinical mobility.
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ranking = 0.034676544626366
keywords = gingival
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3/20. Otodental syndrome: a case report and genetic considerations.

    A 5-year-old boy presented with otodental syndrome. His maxillary and mandibular incisors were within normal limits. The premolar/molar areas in all quadrants were occupied by markedly macrodontic teeth showing globular shape. The canines had a similar rounded shape. Two canines and 1 of the other abnormal teeth demonstrated areas of yellow hypoplastic enamel. Radiographs revealed that some of the abnormal teeth had bifurcated pulp chambers and pulp stones. Premolar tooth germs were absent. audiometry demonstrated that the child had a marked bilateral sensorineural hearing loss for frequencies above 1000 Hz. No other members of the immediate family were clinically affected. The parents of the child were not aware of any similarly affected relatives. Suggestions with respect to possible genetic mechanisms and gene participation in the etiology of this syndrome are offered.
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ranking = 5
keywords = dental
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4/20. Juvenile dermatomyositis: literature review and report of a case.

    dermatomyositis is a rare disease of unknown origin, which affects both children and adults. In the juvenile form, dermatomyositis is a multisystem disease, characterized by myositis; an erythematous rash over the bridge of the nose, around the eyes, and on the trunk and limbs; vasculitis; and dilatation of the capillaries in the nail beds and gum margin. Late development of calcinosis is seen in approximately two-thirds of the patients. This case describes a 5-year-old dental patient diagnosed with dermatomyositis. This article includes the clinical manifestations of dermatomyositis in the body and in the oral cavity as well as the considerations that should be taken when treating these patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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5/20. A Thai mother and son with distal symphalangism, hypoplastic carpal bones, microdontia, dental pulp stones, and narrowing of the zygomatic arch: a new distal symphalangism syndrome?

    A Thai mother and son with distal symphalangism and other associated abnormalities are reported. Distal and middle phalanges of fingers and toes 2-5 were either aplastic/hypoplastic or fused between the corresponding digits. The second fingers and fourth fingernails were most severely affected in both patients. The mother's hands were less severely affected; the middle and distal phalanges of her hands were malformed and fused. Besides the absence of fusion lines, the shape of the fused middle and distal phalanges was quite different from that of other types of fusion, i.e., fused bones in both patients did not maintain the normal configuration of bone, referring to as "middle-distal phalangeal complex". Distal symphalangism was observed in toes 2-5 of the mother and in toe 3 of the son. Both patients had additional clinical manifestations such as narrowing of the zygomatic arch, dental pulp stone, microdontia of a mandibular permanent central incisor, cone-shaped epiphyses of middle phalanges of fingers, and absence of scaphoid, trapezium, trapezoid, and pisiform bones. mutation analysis of NOG and ROR2, the genes responsible for proximal symphalangism and brachydactyly type B, respectively, was negative.
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ranking = 5
keywords = dental
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6/20. Permanent incisors traumatized through predecessors: sequelae and possible management.

    This report describes the sequence of events following a traumatic dental injury to primary maxillary anterior teeth of a five-year old male during a bicycle accident. The development of the affected teeth during the subsequent ten years was studied from the radiographic records. A detailed account of the clinical and radiographic findings as well as the physio-pathologic changes that have taken place is discussed. In view of the inevitable prognosis of dentitions that sustain traumatic injury during the formative years preventive measures and feasible dental management are proposed. These precautionary measures are aimed to circumvent the sequelae that were experienced in the present case, and avoid predictable complications.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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7/20. Symmetrical pulp obliteration in mandibular first molars.

    Pulp obliteration is an extremely rare morphological type of pulp calcification, with calcified material completely occupying the pulp chamber and root canal spaces. The etiology of pulp obliteration may be trauma or systemic diseases such as secondary hyperparathyroidism. Pulp obliteration may also be seen in dental anomalies such as dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentinal dysplasia. In cases of pulp obliteration with periapical disease, the preferred treatment is surgery, while calcified canals without symptoms or periapical lesions are best left untreated.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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8/20. Novel dental anomalies associated with congenital contractural arachnodactyly: a case report.

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue similar to Marfan's syndrome. The craniofacial and oral features of a young girl with CCA are described. The patient has the typical features of CCA as well as some additional dental anomalies which have not previously been reported with this syndrome. These include banded pitted enamel hypoplasia and hypomineralization, long, spindly tapered roots, and pulp canal obliteration with multiple pulp stones. dentists must be aware of the clinical features of a patient's syndrome to determine whether there are implications for dental treatment such as a need for antibiotic prophylaxis. It is important to exclude Marfan's syndrome as a differential diagnosis for CCA because the former has more associated complications and a less favorable prognosis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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9/20. Radiographic oddities: Unusual calcifications in the dental pulp.

    The author describes two examples of a "smiley-face tooth."
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ranking = 4
keywords = dental
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10/20. Case report of a rare syndrome associating amelogenesis imperfecta and nephrocalcinosis in a consanguineous family.

    A rare syndrome associating amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with nephrocalcinosis has been reported. The purpose of this study is to characterise the phenotype of a consanguineous family presenting amelogenesis imperfecta, delayed permanent teeth eruption and nephrocalcinosis. Six family members were examined. Ground sections of the case index deciduous teeth and biopsies of enlarged dental follicles were analysed. The patients's parents were first cousins. The case index had yellow discoloration and altered teeth shapes, retention of deciduous teeth, and delayed eruption. Panoramic radiographs revealed multiple enlarged pericoronal follicles in unerupted teeth and generalised intrapulpal calcifications. Renal ultrasound showed the presence of nephrocalcinosis. No other family members presented enamel defects or nephrocalcinosis. Histologically, the enamel appeared hypoplastic, and dental follicles indicated pericoronal hamartoma. The consanguineous marriage suggests an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Further studies are necessary to clarify the genetic defect behind this syndrome that associates AI, nephrocalcinosis and impaired tooth eruption.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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