Cases reported "Dental Pulp Diseases"

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1/26. herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve third branch: a case report and review of the literature.

    literature review AND CASE REPORT: A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented. Included are differential diagnosis and treatment modalities that will enable the dental practitioner to identify and manage this disease. A case report is provided to amplify this timely information.
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2/26. Endo-Antral syndrome and various endodontic complications.

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the varied impact of the pathological spread of dental sepsis into the adjacent maxillary sinus. This complex of tissue destruction is called Endo-Antral syndrome; the usual radiographic diagnostic features are identified in the paper. The four different cases presented serve to illuminate a few of the many diagnostic and treatment challenges involved. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of a keen sense of wariness when endodontically treating maxillary posterior teeth whose apexes are close to the sinus. Dental examination should include an appraisal of antral health prior to root canal therapy to best plan treatment and to establish a base line against which to judge subsequent developments.
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3/26. Evaluation of aggressive pulp therapy in a population of vitamin d-resistant rickets patients: a follow-up of 4 cases.

    This investigation collected clinical and radiographic data from a retrospective chart review of 4 patients receiving prophylactic formocresol pulpotomies and stainless steel crowns following a dental abscess associated with a medical diagnosis of vitamin-D resistant rickets (VDRR) at texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas, Tex. Clinical and radiographic data were available for 29 primary teeth in 4 children, with follow-up times ranging from 2 years, 1 month to 5 years, 6 months. Based on available recalls of 29 teeth treated following the prophylactic formocresol pulpotomy, 22 failed clinically. The earliest failure occurred at 3 months; the longest time to failure was 3 years, 9 months. No trends were discernable between tooth type and failure rate, although the shorter the time between eruption of the tooth and pulpotomy treatment, the greater the chance of success. Presently, there is not enough evidence to suggest that prophylactic pulpotomy therapy in VDRR patients is beneficial in preserving their primary dentition.
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4/26. The diagnosis of referred orofacial dental pain.

    Every patient's description of the location of pain must be treated with caution. In order to arrive at a diagnosis of pain a logical method should be employed. This consists of the history and clinical examination including pulp tests and radiographs. Where the patient complains of pain on hot or cold, an attempt should be made to reproduce the patient's pain to check on the accuracy of its description and to aid in localisation. patients frequently refer pain to previously endodontically-treated teeth. These may not be the cause of the problem. In order to facilitate the process of diagnosis the following hypothesis has been advanced. A tooth can only be the source of pain if there are objective signs associated with that tooth. Lack of response to pulp tests constitutes such a sign, provided the tooth has not previously been endodontically treated. If, however, such treatment has taken place, (regardless of whether this was well or poorly executed), a further objective sign other than lack of vitality is required before such a tooth can be implicated as the source of pain. The guidelines suggested are illustrated by means of clinical examples.
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5/26. Dental management of patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia.

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a rare hematologic disease characterized by a hypoplastic bone marrow and peripheral pnacytopenia. In severe cases, where conservative medical management has been unsuccessful, bone marrow transplantation is now being performed. Between the years 1971 and 1975, twenty-two patients with severe aplastic anemia were seen at the Children's Hospital Medical Center. This article discusses the oral presentations of aplastic anemia and the dental management of nine patients without and thirteen with transplantations.
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6/26. Periodontal-endodontic interdisciplinary treatment--a case report.

    Periodontal-endodontic lesions pose a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the dental practitioner. A careful diagnostic examination consisting of a thorough patient and dental history, comprehensive clinical examination, and use of appropriate dental radiographs is necessary to arrive at a proper diagnosis of the periodontal-endodontic lesion. Despite these measures, it is not always possible to make an accurate diagnosis, which is imperative to provide the proper therapy in the correct treatment sequence. In some instances, endodontic or periodontal therapy alone may suffice; however, in other instances, a combination of endodontic and periodontal therapy may be required to successfully treat the case. In this article, classifications of periodontal-endodontic lesions are discussed, including the appropriate treatment and correct treatment sequence for each classification. prognosis of periodontal-endodontic lesions depends on the diagnosis, treatment, and chronicity of the lesion, as well as the duration of periodontal involvement. A clinical case is presented in which a periodontal endodontic lesion has been successfully treated with a combination of conventional endodontic therapy and regenerative periodontal surgery.
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7/26. Management of periodontitis associated with endodontically involved teeth: a case series.

    The pulp and the periodontal attachment are the two components that enable a tooth to function in the oral cavity. Lesions of the periodontal ligament and adjacent alveolar bone may originate from infections of the periodontium or tissues of the dental pulp. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. The function of the tooth is severely compromised when either one of these is involved in the disease process. Treatment of disease conditions involving both of these structures can be challenging and frequently requires combining both endodontic and periodontal treatment procedures. This article presents cases of periodontitis associated with endodontic lesions managed by both endodontic and periodontal therapy.
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8/26. Intraoral examination in pyogenic facial lesions.

    Pyogenic cutaneous lesions of the cervicofacial region may be due to a variety of causes. One possibility that should be considered is an odontogenic infection secondary to untreated dental caries, periodontal disease or previous maxillofacial trauma. An intraoral examination is mandatory to evaluate the oral cavity for signs of pathology that may be manifested as a purulent cutaneous lesion. patients with odontogenic infection should be referred to a dentist for definitive treatment, which may consist of either endodontic therapy or extraction of the involved tooth and curettage of any abscesses or fistulous tracts.
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ranking = 1.021566093366
keywords = dental, caries
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9/26. Origin, diagnosis, and treatment of the dental manifestations of vitamin d-resistant rickets: review of the literature and report of case.

    Previous discussions center on early diagnosis, initial treatment, and follow-up therapy for the patient with vitamin d-resistant rickets. Both the medical and dental aspects of treatment for these patients has a long-range effect on the normal developmental patterns. Although treatment is begun at an early age, some rachitic skeletal effects such as minor bowing of the legs and bossing of the skull will invariably be noticed. In patients with controlled rickets the alveolar processes undergo normal development, with apparent normal dental eruption. The poor development and calcification of the alveolus seen in the untreated patient leads to loss of the lamina dura and periodontal ligament of the teeth. patients with resistant rickets possess a functional dentition, although not without inherent defects. Various degrees of fracture and attrition of enamel can be seen, and hypoplasia of dentin is nearly a universal result. Defects extending to the dentinoenamel junction have been shown in repeated cases. Cementum, because of its close relationship with dentin calcification, also appears abnormal. Pulp tissue may undergo abberations of physiology in resistant rickets, although further work in this respect is needed. With respect to the possible dental pathoses seen in this disease, the dental history of the patient with resistant rickets discussed in this report showed that several of the deciduous teeth, possibly the mandibular left second premolar and right first molar, and definitely the maxillary right second premolar and canine and the mandibular left canine had all undergone pulpal degeneration of apparently unknown causation. In the maxillary right second premolar and the mandibular left canine, enamel fractures were clinically and radiographically apparent. However, the maxillary right canine originally had an acute abscess with no defects other than normal, minimal wear facets. No causative factor for its necrosis could be found. Overt enamel fractures in the maxillary right second premolar and the mandibular left canine may have led to microexposures of the pulp with subsequent bacterial pulpal contamination. suppuration present in several of the pulps when first entered during endodontic treatment, as well as chronic fistulas in several areas, support the conclusion that contamination by some means does indeed occur.
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ranking = 8
keywords = dental
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10/26. Multidisciplinary approach to a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion: a case report.

    Esthetic dental treatment under ideal conditions is usually managed routinely without complication. Under such conditions, the periodontium is in a state of health and active periodontal therapy is not needed. However, in the presence of dental pathology, achieving our esthetic goals becomes exceedingly difficult. Correction of periodontal defects often leads to increased recession and interdental spaces, both difficult esthetic problems to manage. When existing periodontal defects are coupled with other pathologic entities, such as caries or trauma, the problems in trying to satisfy our treatment goals are compounded. A multidisciplinary approach is indicated and can provide excellent results.
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ranking = 3.021566093366
keywords = dental, caries
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