Cases reported "Dental Pulp Diseases"

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1/45. Reattachment of a subgingivally fractured central incisor tooth fragment: report of a case.

    A case report of a 9-year-old boy with a fractured maxillary right incisor and ulcerated pulp at the fracture line is presented. On satisfactory completion of a root canal filling one week later, the access cavity was restored with glass ionomer cement. The fragment was reattached by a light activated hybrid composite during the flap surgery. tetracycline hydrochloride was applied on open root surface for a better healing.
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ranking = 1
keywords = pulp
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2/45. herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve third branch: a case report and review of the literature.

    literature review AND CASE REPORT: A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented. Included are differential diagnosis and treatment modalities that will enable the dental practitioner to identify and manage this disease. A case report is provided to amplify this timely information.
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ranking = 0.054039718214454
keywords = dental
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3/45. apexification & apexogenesis.

    When there is pulpal involvement of permanent teeth with incompletely formed roots, techniques for the induction of apical closure should be completed before endodontic therapy is begun. apexification is a method of inducing a calcified barrier at the apex of a nonvital tooth with incomplete root formation. Apexogenesis refers to a vital pulp therapy procedure performed to encourage physiological development and formation of the root end.
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ranking = 2
keywords = pulp
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4/45. Endo-Antral syndrome and various endodontic complications.

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the varied impact of the pathological spread of dental sepsis into the adjacent maxillary sinus. This complex of tissue destruction is called Endo-Antral syndrome; the usual radiographic diagnostic features are identified in the paper. The four different cases presented serve to illuminate a few of the many diagnostic and treatment challenges involved. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of a keen sense of wariness when endodontically treating maxillary posterior teeth whose apexes are close to the sinus. Dental examination should include an appraisal of antral health prior to root canal therapy to best plan treatment and to establish a base line against which to judge subsequent developments.
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ranking = 0.054039718214454
keywords = dental
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5/45. The lateral periodontal cyst: aetiology, clinical significance and diagnosis.

    The lateral periodontal cyst (LPC) is a relatively uncommon but widely recognized odontogenic cyst of developmental origin. It is found mostly in adults and has no sex predilection. LPC is usually discovered during routine radiographic examination, is located mainly between the roots of vital mandibular canines and premolars, and seldom causes pain or other clinical symptoms. The defect appears on radiographs as a round or teardrop-shaped, well circumscribed radiolucency. Due to its location it can easily be misdiagnosed as a lesion of endodontic origin. In this paper, two cases of lateral periodontal cysts are presented. In the first case, the patient (woman, 62 years old) complained of an asymptomatic gingival swelling in the region between the right maxillary canine and premolar. The radiographic examination revealed a well circumscribed radiolucency with a radiopaque margin between the roots of the canine and premolar. The adjacent teeth had vital pulp. Surgical enucleation of the lesion was performed and the histological examination revealed that the lesion was a "lateral periodontal cyst of developmental origin". In the second case, the patient (women, 44 years old) complained of a swelling in the area of tooth 32. During radiographic examination a well circumscribed radiolucency between the roots of the lateral incisor and the canine was discovered. Surgical enucleation of the lesion was performed and the histological examination revealed that the lesion was a "lateral periodontal cyst of developmental origin".
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keywords = pulp
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6/45. Garre's osteomyelitis associated with a fistula: a case report.

    A report of Garre's osteomyelitis of the mandible associated with a fistula is presented. Elimination of pulpal periapical infection through endodontic therapy was shown to be an effective treatment. The total bone healing was observed one year later.
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ranking = 1
keywords = pulp
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7/45. The pulpectomy in primary teeth.

    BACKGROUND: The pulpectomy is an underutilized treatment modality for severely infected primary teeth. CASE DESCRIPTION: The author presents two pulpectomy cases that were filled with Vitapex. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Vitapex is an excellent filling material for primary tooth pulpectomies. Its clinical characteristics and ease of use may make the pulpectomy procedure a more-attractive alternative to extraction.
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ranking = 8
keywords = pulp
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8/45. Evaluation of aggressive pulp therapy in a population of vitamin d-resistant rickets patients: a follow-up of 4 cases.

    This investigation collected clinical and radiographic data from a retrospective chart review of 4 patients receiving prophylactic formocresol pulpotomies and stainless steel crowns following a dental abscess associated with a medical diagnosis of vitamin-D resistant rickets (VDRR) at texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas, Tex. Clinical and radiographic data were available for 29 primary teeth in 4 children, with follow-up times ranging from 2 years, 1 month to 5 years, 6 months. Based on available recalls of 29 teeth treated following the prophylactic formocresol pulpotomy, 22 failed clinically. The earliest failure occurred at 3 months; the longest time to failure was 3 years, 9 months. No trends were discernable between tooth type and failure rate, although the shorter the time between eruption of the tooth and pulpotomy treatment, the greater the chance of success. Presently, there is not enough evidence to suggest that prophylactic pulpotomy therapy in VDRR patients is beneficial in preserving their primary dentition.
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ranking = 8.0540397182145
keywords = pulp, dental
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9/45. The diagnosis of referred orofacial dental pain.

    Every patient's description of the location of pain must be treated with caution. In order to arrive at a diagnosis of pain a logical method should be employed. This consists of the history and clinical examination including pulp tests and radiographs. Where the patient complains of pain on hot or cold, an attempt should be made to reproduce the patient's pain to check on the accuracy of its description and to aid in localisation. patients frequently refer pain to previously endodontically-treated teeth. These may not be the cause of the problem. In order to facilitate the process of diagnosis the following hypothesis has been advanced. A tooth can only be the source of pain if there are objective signs associated with that tooth. Lack of response to pulp tests constitutes such a sign, provided the tooth has not previously been endodontically treated. If, however, such treatment has taken place, (regardless of whether this was well or poorly executed), a further objective sign other than lack of vitality is required before such a tooth can be implicated as the source of pain. The guidelines suggested are illustrated by means of clinical examples.
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ranking = 2.2161588728578
keywords = pulp, dental
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10/45. Pathologic interactions in pulpal and periodontal tissues.

    Both endodontic and periodontal disease are caused by a mixed anaerobic infection. The pathways for the spread of bacteria between pulpal and periodontal tissues have been discussed with controversy. This article is an attempt to provide a rational approach to the perio-endo/endo-perio question based on a review of the relevant literature. In the light of evidence, clinical concepts for the diagnosis and treatment of lesions involving both periodontal and pulpal tissues are discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = pulp
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