Cases reported "Dental Pulp Diseases"

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11/34. Pulp canal obliteration in an unerupted permanent incisor following trauma to its primary predecessor: a case report.

    Trauma to a primary tooth may result in damage to the underlying developing permanent tooth bud because of the close proximity between the root of the primary tooth and its permanent successor. We report an unusual case where injury to the primary dentition resulted in pulp canal obliteration (PCO) of a permanent maxillary central incisor prior to its eruption. The other permanent maxillary central incisor was diagnosed as malformed because of trauma to the primary dentition at an earlier age. The occurrences of PCO or crown malformation dose not routinely disrupt the eruption of those teeth. Periodic assessment is required to determine the need for endodontic intervention.
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12/34. Management of periodontitis associated with endodontically involved teeth: a case series.

    The pulp and the periodontal attachment are the two components that enable a tooth to function in the oral cavity. Lesions of the periodontal ligament and adjacent alveolar bone may originate from infections of the periodontium or tissues of the dental pulp. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. The function of the tooth is severely compromised when either one of these is involved in the disease process. Treatment of disease conditions involving both of these structures can be challenging and frequently requires combining both endodontic and periodontal treatment procedures. This article presents cases of periodontitis associated with endodontic lesions managed by both endodontic and periodontal therapy.
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13/34. Early loading of interforaminal implants immediately installed after extraction of teeth presenting endodontic and periodontal lesions.

    BACKGROUND: infection in tooth extraction sites has traditionally been considered an indication to postpone implant insertion until the infection has been resolved. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rate of early-loaded implants placed immediately after extraction of teeth with endodontic and periodontal lesions in the mandible. MATERIALS AND methods: Twenty patients in need of mandibular implant treatment and with teeth showing signs of infection in the interforaminal area were included in the study. The patients received four to six implants (Branemark System, Nobel Biocare AB, Goteborg, sweden) in or close to the fresh extraction sockets and received a provisional prosthesis within 3 days. Final prostheses were delivered after 3 to 12 months. The surgical protocol paid special attention to the preservation of high implant stability and control of the inflammatory response. The patients were followed up for 15 to 44 months. RESULTS: No implants were lost, resulting in a 100% survival rate. A mean marginal bone loss of 0.7 mm (SD 1.2 mm) was registered during the observation period. No signs of infection around the implants were detected at any follow-up visit. CONCLUSION: A high survival rate can be achieved for immediately placed and early-loaded implants in the mandible despite the presence of infection at the extracted teeth.
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14/34. Intraoral examination in pyogenic facial lesions.

    Pyogenic cutaneous lesions of the cervicofacial region may be due to a variety of causes. One possibility that should be considered is an odontogenic infection secondary to untreated dental caries, periodontal disease or previous maxillofacial trauma. An intraoral examination is mandatory to evaluate the oral cavity for signs of pathology that may be manifested as a purulent cutaneous lesion. patients with odontogenic infection should be referred to a dentist for definitive treatment, which may consist of either endodontic therapy or extraction of the involved tooth and curettage of any abscesses or fistulous tracts.
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15/34. Two root canals in a maxillary central incisor with enamel hypoplasia.

    Presented is a case of enamel hypoplasia of a maxillary central incisor which was referred for endodontic therapy. Radiographical examination revealed a tooth having one root and two canals. Endodontic therapy was performed under aseptic conditions.
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16/34. Referred pain of muscular origin resembling endodontic involvement. Case report.

    Referred pain is common in the orofacial region and can cause considerable difficulties in diagnosis. Referred pain is defined as pain that is referred to a part of the body other than the site of origin, and as a result, severe pain may arise without an associated causative lesion. A muscular trigger point that resembled a tooth with endodontic involvement is discussed.
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17/34. Failure of endodontic treatment due to a palatal gingival groove in a maxillary lateral incisor with talon cusp and two root canals.

    A case is presented in which endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with a talon cusp and two root canals failed following a mistaken diagnosis. What was first diagnosed as an endodontic lesion was, in all probability, a primary periodontal lesion caused by the advance of bacteria from the gingival crevice to the apex along the radicular groove between the main tooth and the talon cusp.
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18/34. Rapid furcation involvement associated with a devitalizing mandibular first molar. A case report.

    literature reports and journal articles on endodontic-periodontic relationships are numerous. Presented is a brief review of the diagnostic tests, the classification of endoperiodontic lesions, and a clinical report that covers an unusually rapid development of furcation involvement associated with a tooth that became nonvital.
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19/34. Case of mistaken identity: periapical cemental dysplasia in an endodontically treated tooth.

    A case of a patient with a history of root canal treatment and re-treatment and a persistent periapical radiolucency is reviewed. Following surgery, biopsy material was submitted and diagnosed as periapical cemental dysplasia (PCD). With careful diagnosis, PCD should be readily differentiated from endodontic pathosis, thus avoiding unnecessary root canal treatment. In this case, surgery was necessary to rule out other inflammatory disease or benign odontogenic entities.
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20/34. Isolated extramedullary relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia in a tooth.

    We report a case of isolated extramedullary relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia in a tooth following bone marrow transplantation. The patient was a 4-yr-old child who developed gingival swelling and bleeding while in bone marrow remission. Crush artifact prevented definitive diagnosis of leukemic relapse in a biopsy of the gingival soft tissue, but decalcification of the tooth showed an unequivocal leukemic infiltrate in the dental pulp. Decalcification and sectioning of extracted teeth are recommended when equivocal findings are present in the gingival soft tissue or when there is a history of lymphoreticular malignancy.
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