Cases reported "Dental Pulp Necrosis"

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1/80. diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous facial sinus tracts of dental origin.

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous draining sinus tracts of dental origin often are a diagnostic challenge. A delay in correctly diagnosing these types of lesions can result in ineffective and inappropriate treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present five cases of facial lesions that were initially misdiagnosed as lesions of nonodontogenic origin. The correct diagnosis in each case was cutaneous sinus tract secondary to pulpal necrosis and suppurative apical periodontitis. All facial sinus tracts resolved after the patients received nonsurgical root canal therapy. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: As patients with cutaneous facial sinus tracts of dental origin often do not have obvious dental symptoms, possible dental etiology may be overlooked. Early correct diagnosis and treatment of these lesions can help prevent unnecessary and ineffective antibiotic therapy or surgical treatment.
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keywords = pulp, dental
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2/80. Apex formation during orthodontic treatment in an adult patient: report of a case.

    This clinical report describes an apexification procedure on a maxillary left central incisor in a 34-year-old male who was also receiving active orthodontic treatment. The pulp of the tooth had become necrotic following a traumatic injury when the patient was 8 years of age. Despite the tooth undergoing active orthodontic repositioning with fixed appliances, root-end closure occurred uneventfully and within 3 years.
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ranking = 0.94374876189915
keywords = pulp
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3/80. Successful treatment of pulpal-periodontal combined lesion in a birooted maxillary lateral incisor with concomitant palato-radicular groove. A case report.

    Palato-radicular groove (PRG) is a common developmental anomaly of maxillary incisors, whereas PRG associated with a birooted maxillary incisor is relatively infrequent. The clinical significance of PRG is related to the incidence of localized periodontitis with or without pulpal pathosis, depending on the depth, extent, and complexity of the groove. Successful treatments of PRG in single-rooted incisors have been reported in the literature. However, treatment of PRG in birooted incisors has often been ineffective. This case report describes a pulpal-periodontal combined lesion occurring on a birooted maxillary left lateral incisor with concomitant PRG in a 13-year-old boy which was successfully treated by conventional endodontic therapy in combination with periodontal treatment including accessory root resection, radiculoplasty and bone grafting. Seven-year follow-up is included in this report. The basis of a successful result is accurate diagnosis and elimination of inflammatory irritants and contributory factors. awareness of the existence of this abnormality by the clinician is important.
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ranking = 5.6624925713949
keywords = pulp
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4/80. Periapical cemental dysplasia: case report.

    The authors present a case of periapical cemental dysplasia affecting the mandibular left canine, with vital pulp, in a 43-year-old black female patient, an occurrence that follows the classical cases found in the literature. The need of a careful history, clinical and radiographic exams and vitality tests are emphasized in order to reach the correct diagnosis of this disease.
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ranking = 0.94374876189915
keywords = pulp
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5/80. A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of an intruded maxillary permanent incisor complicated by the presence of two mesiodentes.

    Treatment of a traumatically intruded maxillary incisor with an immature apex remains controversial. Treatment options include observation, surgical repositioning, or orthodontic forced eruption. Likewise, the ideal timing of surgical removal of a mesiodens is highly controversial: immediate versus delayed intervention. The complications associated with untreated supernumerary teeth include: overretention of primary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent incisors, rotations, impaction, diastema, pulp necrosis and root resorption. Less common sequelae include enlarged follicular sacs, cystic degeneration and nasal eruption. This paper describes another risk factor associated with delayed removal of a mesiodens previously not mentioned in the dental literature, namely potential complications arising from a traumatic injury, in particular intrusion, of the maxillary permanent incisors.
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ranking = 0.95078016666176
keywords = pulp, dental
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6/80. Reversible and irreversible painful pulpitides: diagnosis and treatment.

    The foregoing clinical evidence indicates that when pain is severe, or when mild to moderate pain is present with a previous history of pain in the aching tooth, with or without periapical radiolucency, the tooth is in the IRPP category. Treatment dictates endodontic therapy or extraction. On the other hand, when clinical evidence indicates that the pain is mild or moderate with no previous history of pain, normal pulp vitality, and there is no positive percussion sign, the pulp is in the RPP category. Treatment dictates indirect or direct pulp capping in teeth with or without periapical radiolucency. The success rate favours teeth with no periapical radiolucency, 98%; in teeth with periapical radiolucency the success rate is less favorable, 43%. Efforts should be made to maintain pulp vitality. Endodontic therapy can always be done, if in time the pulp develops necrosis.
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ranking = 8.4937388570924
keywords = pulp
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7/80. Treatment of middle-apical level root fracture in necrotic teeth.

    The purpose of this paper is to present two case reports of dental trauma with middle-apical level root fractures and pulp necrosis. The treatment consisted of programmed applications of calcium hydroxide until a calcified barrier was formed at the fracture level. The technique presented here proved efficient in treating horizontal fractures at the middle and apical thirds of the root.
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ranking = 0.95078016666176
keywords = pulp, dental
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8/80. Revascularization of an immature permanent tooth with apical periodontitis and sinus tract.

    A necrotic immature mandibular second premolar with periapical involvement in a 13-year-old patient was treated. Instead of the standard root canal treatment protocol and apexification, antimicrobial agents were used in the canal, after which the canal was left empty. Radiographic examination showed the start of apical closure 5 months after the completion of the antimicrobial protocol. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure was confirmed 30 months after the treatment, indicating the revascularization potential of a young permanent tooth pulp into a bacteria-free root canal space.
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ranking = 0.94374876189915
keywords = pulp
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9/80. Management of teeth with open apices and necrotic pulps with single visit apexification: 3 representative cases.

    apexification is the most widely accepted procedure for the treatment of nonvital immature teeth. Single visit apexification is less time consuming, more economical and an easily acceptable technique with the aim of inducing the formation of a hard tissue barrier, thus allowing proper condensation of gutta percha in the root canal. Factors considered during this procedure are: i. debridement of root canal minimizing the infection and filling the root canal space with resorbable calcification inducing material i.e. Ca(OH)2. ii. Minimal mechanical intervention to maintain the integrity and vascularity of apical region. Once filled, Ca(OH)2 was not changed again and the treated tooth was examined only radiographically till the desired apical closure was achieved. Three representative cases treated with this single visit apexification technique are discussed here. In all the cases successful apical closure of different types was achieved. Treatment was then concluded with gutta percha obturation in all the cases with successful follow up.
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ranking = 3.7749950475966
keywords = pulp
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10/80. Multidisciplinary evaluation and clinical management of mesiodens.

    Supernumerary teeth are a disorder of odontogenesis relatively common in the oral cavity and characterized by an excess number of teeth. The term mesiodens is used to refer to an unerupted supernumerary tooth in the central region of the premaxilla between the two central incisors. The complications associated with mesiodens include: lack of eruption of permanent teeth, the deviation of the eruption path, rotations, retention, root re-absorption and pulp necrosis with loss of vitality, and diastema. Early detection of mesiodens is most important if such complications are to be avoided. This report describes the treatment of a maxillary central incisor impacted by a mesiodens. The case initially required only surgical treatment, to remove the supernumerary tooth. Successively, orthodontic therapy was done to bring into position the left permanent central incisor, which erupted physiologically, but rotated 90 degrees around along its long axis.
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ranking = 0.94374876189915
keywords = pulp
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