Cases reported "Dental Pulp Necrosis"

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1/15. Delayed apical healing after apexification treatment of non-vital immature tooth: a case report.

    We report the endodontic treatment of a non-vital permanent immature tooth in which unexpected complications such as exacerbation of apical periodontitis followed by external root resorption occurred after that the initial stages of the healing process were clinically and radiographically evident. After continued treatment stable repair was obtained.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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2/15. A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of an intruded maxillary permanent incisor complicated by the presence of two mesiodentes.

    Treatment of a traumatically intruded maxillary incisor with an immature apex remains controversial. Treatment options include observation, surgical repositioning, or orthodontic forced eruption. Likewise, the ideal timing of surgical removal of a mesiodens is highly controversial: immediate versus delayed intervention. The complications associated with untreated supernumerary teeth include: overretention of primary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent incisors, rotations, impaction, diastema, pulp necrosis and root resorption. Less common sequelae include enlarged follicular sacs, cystic degeneration and nasal eruption. This paper describes another risk factor associated with delayed removal of a mesiodens previously not mentioned in the dental literature, namely potential complications arising from a traumatic injury, in particular intrusion, of the maxillary permanent incisors.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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3/15. Internal root resorption associated with inadequate caries removal and orthodontic therapy.

    This case report presents a case of internal root resorption originating from inadequate caries removal and orthodontic therapy in maxillary right lateral incisor in a 13-yr-old female. A preoperative, panoramic radiograph taken at the orthodontic office showed no evidence of resorption, however, the composite restoration in the coronal portion was inadequate. During 4 months of nickel titanium orthodontic wire activation, the patient suffered spontaneous pain. Periapical radiographs revealed internal root resorption in the middle third of the root. Endodontic treatment was accomplished and coronal restorations were completed with composite resin. Periodical radiograph examination as well as orthodontic treatment was continued. The tooth was clinically and radiographically healthy at the 18-month follow-up. The importance of the preoperative radiographic examination as well as radiographs during orthodontic treatment is affirmed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = resorption
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4/15. bone regeneration after surgical repositioning of impacted mandibular second molars: a case report.

    A case is presented where the mesially impacted mandibular second molar teeth were surgically uprighted in an 11-year-old female patient. bone regeneration is shown in the areas occupied by the impacted second molars with maturation of bone and cortication of the crest of the alveolar bone. The probing depths are also normal with no residual bony defects. This healing was achieved with no bone grafting procedure, emphasizing two important factors: to prevent/minimize any trauma to the tissues at the site of elevation and uprighting of the tooth (i.e. maintaining viable periodontal ligament cells and minimal cementum damage); and to obtain primary closure whilst allowing the tissue in the mesial defect to reorganize against the scaffold of bone. However, the procedure on the one side was complicated with necrosis and infection of the pulp space with external inflammatory root resorption. Endodontic therapy of this tooth proved to be successful with periradicular healing radiographically and re-establishment of the lamina dura. At the 3-year follow-up, the endodontically treated tooth showed no clinical and radiographic signs of pathology. The left second mandibular molar had no pulpal or periodontal postsurgical complications, which may be attributed to apparently more open apices allowing for pulp revascularization after manipulation at the time of surgery. This report illustrates unassisted wound healing that occurs in the area of uprighting with complete reconstitution of periodontal anatomy without additional regenerative procedures to augment bone.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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5/15. A novel multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of an intruded immature permanent incisor.

    The optimal treatment for intruded permanent teeth has not yet been determined. The ideal treatment option is the one with the lowest probability of developing complications such as external root resorption and marginal bone loss. Each case should be considered individually, bearing in mind the severity of the intrusion, the stage of root development, and tooth mobility. Management of an intruded permanent tooth may consist of: (1) observation for spontaneous eruption; (2) surgical crown uncovering; (3) orthodontic extrusion (with or without prior luxation of the intruded tooth); (4) and partial surgical extrusion, immediately followed by orthodontic extrusion and surgical repositioning. The purpose of this article was to review the treatment options for intruded immature permanent incisors, and to present a new modality of an elective internal strengthening of the immature root weakened by external root resorption. A case of an intrusive luxation injury in a 7 1/2-year-old child and the resulting complications utilizing this technique is described. This is the first known report in the pediatric dentistry literature of performing an elective (preventive) internal strengthening of an immature root weakened by severe external inflammatory resorption. The child was followed for 5 years with an excellent clinical outcome. This technique should be considered for treatment of immature permanent teeth with thin cervical root dentin and external or internal root resorption due to trauma or caries.
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ranking = 4
keywords = resorption
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6/15. Treatment of invasive cervical resorption with MTA: case report.

    This paper presents a case report of a maxillary lateral incisor affected by invasive cervical resorption. The tooth was submitted to a 21-day treatment with calcium hydroxide followed by root canal filling. The area of resorption was sealed with MTA followed by glass ionomer cement and restored with composite resin. Two-year radiographic follow-up showed stability of the resorption site and normal coronal colour and depth of gingival sulcus.
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ranking = 7
keywords = resorption
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7/15. A case of progressive external root resorption.

    This case report describes a radiographical, histological and histochemical study of an extracted mandibular tooth with progressive external root resorption. The cells which appeared to be responsible for the hard tissue resorption showed an intense acid phosphatase activity, similar to that of bone-resorbing cells. Some aspects on the etiology and pathogenesis of resorptive process that occurred in the present case are discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = resorption
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8/15. Inflammatory resorption caused by an adjacent necrotic tooth.

    A case history is presented with a large periapical lesion and a perforating resorption defect on a cuspid. Endodontic therapy was performed, presuming that the necrotic cuspid caused the inflammatory response. No radiographic healing was evident 18 months after endodontic therapy. Considerable healing was demonstrated 6 months later, following the extraction of an adjacent tooth with prior root canal therapy. It was concluded that the failing root canal therapy of the extracted tooth was the primary factor leading to the inflammatory lesion, the resorptive perforation of the adjacent tooth, and its pulpal necrosis. It has not been reported prior that inflammatory resorption can result from the pulpal necrosis of an adjacent tooth.
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ranking = 6
keywords = resorption
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9/15. Endodontic treatment of infected primary teeth, using Maisto's paste.

    A method of endodontic treatment, using a modification of Maisto's paste, is suggested for preservation of infected primary teeth. Adding more zinc-oxide reagent and other anti-bacterial materials to the original Walkhoff's paste (Kri 1), for pulp canal medication and final filling, seems to improve the pharmacological effect of the paste by reducing the resorption rate. The literature is reviewed and a case with a follow-up time of three and a half years is described, in which the tooth remained stable.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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10/15. calcium hydroxide in the treatment of external root resorption.

    A case is presented in which calcium hydroxide was used in endodontic treatment of external root resorption in a tooth with a necrotic pulp, during active orthodontic movement. A calcified deposit formed, filling a defect, and the tooth was subsequently obturated with gutta-percha. Thus, both types of therapy--endodontic and orthodontic--were performed simultaneously.
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ranking = 5
keywords = resorption
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