Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/48. Fingertip dermatitis in an ophthalmologist caused by proparacaine.

    PURPOSE: To report the late diagnosis of allergic response to proparacaine hydrochloride in an ophthalmologist. METHOD: Case report. In a 49-year-old practicing ophthalmologist, the history, clinical findings of fingertip dermatitis, skin pathology, and skin patch testing are described. RESULTS: Proparacaine, as the initiating agent, took almost 3 years to identify because of the unusual pattern of allergy. We explored numerous treatment options before identifying and removing the offending agent. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologists may be exposed to proparacaine on a daily basis. This unique report heightens the awareness of this rare work-related complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/48. Allergic contact dermatitis from a perinone-type dye C.I. Solvent Orange 60 in spectacle frames.

    This is the 1st case report of allergic contact dermatitis from a perinone-type plastic dye, C.I. Solvent Orange 60, used in the earpieces of spectacle frames. Sensitization of this dye was confirmed by patch tests and chemical analysis of the causative earpieces and coloring agents. Solvent Orange 60 is suspected of being the contact allergen in at least 2 other Japanese cases of spectacle earpiece dermatitis, and provoked strong reactions on sensitized individuals. Its use in products that are applied on human skin for a prolonged period of time, such as spectacle frames or hearing aids, would best be avoided.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/48. Allergic contact cheilitis due to effervescent dental cleanser: combined responsibilities of the allergen persulfate and prosthesis porosity.

    A 55-year-old man with a dental prosthesis for 3 years had had a chronic relapsing cheilitis for more than 1 year. He was patch tested with the European standard series, his own topicals, and the dental cleanser at 10% pet. A relevant positive reaction was found to the cleansing agent, which contained 20% potassium persulfate. The breakdown of the test confirmed sensitivity to this agent and to ammonium persulfate, both positive ( ) at 2.5% pet. The patient was free of symptoms after he had avoided the cleanser. Subsequent chemical investigations performed with a fragment of a used dental prosthesis revealed strong adsorption of persulfate, both on the resin and on the dental tartar. Cleansing agents, adsorbed on tartar and porous resins of worn dental prostheses, should be considered as potential sensitizers and consequently patch tested on such patients with chronic cheilitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/48. Allergic contact dermatitis to polyethylene glycol and nitrofurazone.

    We report a case of worsening dermatitis after the application of an antibiotic ointment (Furacin) containing furazone and polyethylene glycol. patch tests to nickel sulfate, potassium dischromate, chloride cobalt, Furacin, nitrofurazone 1% petrolatum, polyethylene glycol mix 4% petrolatum, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 300 4% petrolatum, and PEG 400 as is (ai) were positive. The use of topical agents containing nitrofurazone or polyethylene glycol on damaged skin may predispose to contact allergy. We discuss the sensitizing properties of nitrofurazone and polyethylene glycol.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/48. Airborne contact dermatitis from methylchloroisothiazolinone in wall paint. Abolition of symptoms by chemical allergen inactivation.

    Preservatives such as isothiazolinones in paints have been reported to cause airborne contact dermatitis. The patients whom we report experienced acute dermatitis on air-exposed skin and respiratory symptoms after staying in recently painted rooms. Kathon (methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone) added as preservative to the wall paint was identified as causative agent. In one individual symptoms rapidly disappeared after treatment of the painted walls with inorganic sulfur salt, which leads to inactivation of the allergenic properties of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. We describe the patients, the clinical course and review the literature pertinent to such cases. In addition we report on the chemical analyses of the decorating paints used, and on experiments on emission and air concentration of methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone from a painted surface before and after inactivation by sodium bisulfite.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/48. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by skin painting (pseudotattooing) with black henna, a mixture of henna and p-phenylenediamine and its derivatives.

    BACKGROUND: skin painting (pseudotattooing) with henna is traditionally performed mainly in Muslim or Hindu persons. Recently, transient artists have begun using black henna mixtures to temporarily paint the skin. Emergence of allergic contact dermatitis after application indicates the presence of a skin sensitizer in such preparations and poses future risks. OBSERVATIONS: Four patients developed allergic contact dermatitis after skin painting with black henna performed in france, egypt, and the united states. The delay of symptoms suggested previous sensitization in 1 patient and active sensitization in 3 patients. Of 3 patients who underwent patch testing, the results were positive for p-phenylenediamine in 3 patients and for p-toluylenediamine in 1 patient. These sensitizers are found in hair dye preparations. CONCLUSIONS: The mixtures used by the artists possibly contained natural henna, a rare and weak skin sensitizer, and likely contained chemical coloring agents, diaminobenzenes, such as p-phenylenediamine and/or diaminotoluenes. The long duration of skin contact, the high concentrations of sensitizing materials, and the lack of a neutralizing agent dramatically increase the risk of skin sensitization, which is why such substances are prohibited for direct skin application. Because of the worldwide vogue of skin painting, future cases of sensitization to p-phenylenediamine and diaminobenzenes or diaminotoluenes are expected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/48. Allergic contact dermatitis from a pyridine derivative in polyvinyl chloride leather.

    Antimicrobial coating of household products has gained wide acceptance in japan in the past several years. Pyridine derivatives, used as antifungal or antibacterial agents in many common products, are known to cause contact dermatitis. We present a case of severe contact dermatitis caused by a pyridine derivative used as an antifungal agent in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) leather of a chair. An open patch test was performed with each ingredient of the PVC leather. Other products were previously eliminated from consideration based on a series of negative patch tests. The PVC leather obtained from the patient's chair gave a reaction with evident blistering, according to the International Contact dermatitis research Group standard. Fifteen ingredients of the PVC leather were open patch tested; a positive reaction was found with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4 (methylsulphonyl) pyridine (1% in petrolatum). Clinicians should be aware that antifungal or antibacterial agents may be increasingly incorporated into common household products and should be suspected in cases of contact dermatitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/48. Contact dermatitis due to printer's ink in a milk industry employee: case report and review of the allergen paraphenylenediamine.

    Paraphenylenediamine is a common cause of occupational dermatoses in hairdressers, metallurgy workers, and others. hand dermatitis developed in an employee of a milk packaging facility. The employee's hands were exposed to milk cartons embossed with wet printer's ink on a daily basis for 2 years. The worker was evaluated through a history, physical examination, and patch testing with 50 standard allergens. Patch testing revealed a positive reaction to paraphenylenediamine. The hand dermatitis resolved once the patient instituted protective measures. The worker's reaction might represent a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to printer's ink that contained this agent. More likely, the inciting agent was some other ingredient of the printer's ink that cross-reacts with paraphenylenediamine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/48. asthma, rhinitis and dermatitis triggered by fungal infection: therapeutic effects of terbinafine.

    We report 2 atopic patients suffering from tinea unguium caused by trichophyton rubrum. In addition, both patients had symptoms of allergies: one had perennial rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma, the other had chronic dermatitis of the face and neck. In both cases, their allergy symptoms improved dramatically during oral therapy with the antifungal agent terbinafine (250 mg/day) and relapsed after its discontinuation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/48. Allergic contact dermatitis to proparacaine with subsequent cross-sensitization to tetracaine from ophthalmic preparations.

    We report 2 cases of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to proparacaine and tetracaine. Patient 1 is an ophthalmologist with chronic finger pad dermatitis sensitized to the topical anesthetic proparacaine. Despite discontinuance of proparacaine and substitution with a patch test negative agent, tetracaine, his hand dermatitis persisted. Follow up patch testing documented that acquisition of contact allergy to tetracaine as well as thiuram had taken place. Patient 2 had a periocular eczematous dermatitis with ACD to both proparacaine and tetracaine. Cross sensitization between related topical ophthalmologic anesthetics has been suggested to be a rare occurrence. We suggest that allergic sensitization and possible cross-reaction to topical anesthetics in ophthalmologists and ophthalmologic technicians is an occupational hazard. Chronically eczematized skin might result in increased exposure to contact allergens and result in concomitant allergic sensitization. ACD to topical anesthetic agents among ophthalmologists should be recognized as a potential hazard.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Dermatitis, Allergic Contact'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.