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1/97. An epidemic of occupational contact dermatitis from an immersion oil for microscopy in laboratory personnel.

    Since November 1997, 14 successive cases of occupational contact dermatitis were observed in 13 laboratory technicians and 1 physician, working in a genetics laboratory in Leuven (belgium) in 3 laboratories of bacteriology in Strasbourg, Montbeliard and Angers, and in the laboratory of hematology in Bordeaux (france). The dermatitis, located on the hands, forearms and face, relapsed after each exposure to an immersion oil for microscopy. patch tests performed in 10 patients were positive to epoxy resin (ER) in the European standard series (10/10 patients) and to newly formulated Leica immersion oil (7/7), 1 patient testing negatively with the former oil. A breakdown performed in 2 patients with the oil's ingredients confirmed sensitization to liquid modified ER components, contained at >80% concentration in the oil. The presence of DGEBA was demonstrated by HPLC analysis at a /-30% rate. Although the safety data sheet indicated a revision of the formula, nobody was alerted to the risk of sensitization and the need for skin protection. ERs, as a source of occupational allergy, can provoke epidemics of contact dermatitis in industry. This report of epidemic contact dermatitis from ERs, used for their optical properties in an immersion oil for microscopy, emphasizes the need for perpetual vigilance in occupational medicine and the usefulness of multicentre contacts in dermato-allergology.
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2/97. Facial dermatitis, contact urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma induced by potato.

    BACKGROUND: Potato contains multiple heat-labile proteins which can induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis have been described in association with potato exposure. OBJECTIVE: A patient with possible airborne facial dermatitis to potato is described. RESULTS: A middle-aged atopic housewife with pre-existent atopic dermatitis suffered from rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, and contact urticaria when pealing raw potatoes, but her main complaint was intense, treatment-resistant dermatitis of the face. The investigations showed a positive prick test, a positive patch test, and positive specific serum IgE to raw potato. Potato avoidance led not only to the resolution of the immediate symptoms, but also of the facial dermatitis, suggesting she had dermatitis due to this vegetable. CONCLUSIONS: Potato may induce contact dermatitis with positive immediate and delayed hypersensitivity tests.
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3/97. Occupational protein contact dermatitis to cornstarch in a paper adhesive.

    BACKGROUND: Protein contact dermatitis is better known in food-service and health-care workers than in industrial workers. Cornstarch has seldom been a problem, although it can cause contact urticaria to glove powder. OBJECTIVE: To present the case of a paper-bag maker who developed severe occupational (protein) contact dermatitis within two-three hours after returning to work. She lacked any evidence of urticaria and demonstrated largely negative patch-test results. methods: Following a history of occupational exposure to a cornstarch-based adhesive, the patient was patch-tested to materials with which she had worked, which she contacted, and with which she had attempted treatment. Following patch testing, she was prick-tested to cornstarch, the principal ingredient in the adhesive. RESULTS: Patch testing was negative except for a very mild reaction to the adhesive. Prick testing to cornstarch was more severe than the histamine control. The test site became eczematous and remained so for more than ten weeks. Avoidance of cornstarch and the adhesive was followed by clearing. CONCLUSION: Workup for prominent occupational contact dermatitis without urticaria may sometimes require testing for type 1 allergy.
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ranking = 151.52093267094
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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4/97. Laboratory assistant's occupational allergic airborne contact dermatitis from nickel presenting as rosacea.

    A male laboratory assistant working in a metallurgical laboratory with airborne exposure to nickel dust developed highly pruritic, rosacea-like symptoms. The symptoms cleared within eight days without treatment when the patient was off work. Patch testing confirmed nickel allergy. Based on the patient's work and clinical history it was evident that occupational exposure to airborne nickel induced the highly abnormal rosacea-like symptoms, not previously reported from nickel.
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ranking = 152.52093267094
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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5/97. Human seminal plasma protein allergy: a diagnosis rarely considered.

    women with seminal plasma protein allergy (SPPA) have an immunologic response to human semen. Symptoms vary from local inflammation and pruritus to systemic anaphylaxis after exposure. The first case was documented in germany in 1958. prevalence is difficult to determine because of the sensitive nature of the symptoms and resultant underreporting. The immunologic etiology of the allergy is not clearly understood; however, it is thought to be an IgE-mediated response from mast cells. patients with SPPA often have recurrent vaginitis associated with intercourse and are unresponsive to traditional therapies. The gold standard of diagnosis is absence of symptoms with condom use. Treatments include cromolyn vaginal cream for local reactions and immunotherapy with human seminal plasma. Treatment success has been varied. The implications and impact of SPPA on sexuality and reproduction are significant, and this allergy should be added to the provider's list of differential diagnoses for recurrent vaginitis in sexually active women.
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6/97. Sensitization to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC) with cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    The case is presented of a man with allergic contact dermatitis and occupational asthma due to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC), which is used as a hardener in thermosetting powder paint. The contact dermatitis was confirmed by patch testing (TGIC 0.5% and 5% in petrolatum), and the occupational asthma was confirmed by bronchial provocation testing: two challenges to an aerosol of lactose containing TGIC (0.05% and 0.1%, w/w, each for 0.5 1 2 4 min) led to a maximal decrease in FEV1 of 22% and 31% after 6 and 4 h, respectively. Skin prick tests with unconjugated TGIC were possibly positive. This case confirms that exposure to TGIC in powder paints may cause not only contact dermatitis, but also occupational asthma.
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7/97. Epoxy resin allergy from microscopy immersion oil.

    A bacteriology technical officer presented with episodes of burning pruritus and urticarial-like lesions on the face and forearms. Patch testing was strongly positive for epoxy resin. The exposure was occupational to the re-formulation of microscopy immersion oil.
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8/97. Allergy to lichen acids in a fragrance.

    A 48-year-old clerical officer with a recurrent facial eruption had positive patch test reactions to nickel, fragrance mix and lichen acid mix. On testing to individual ingredients of fragrance mix and lichen acid mix, she had 2 reactions to oak moss, which is thought to be the main allergen in fragrance mix, and to usnic acid, which is one of a number of lichen acids comprising oak moss. Avoidance of fragrance use resulted in clearing of the eruption but, subsequently, an acute vesicular flare on her face and hands occurred after exposure to lichen on garden shrubs.
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9/97. lamivudine (3TC)-induced contact dermatitis.

    The nucleoside analogue lamivudine (3TC) is commonly used in multidrug therapy of human immunodeficiency virus-1 disease because it not only potentiates the antiviral effects of other reverse transcriptase inhibitors, but it is also relatively nontoxic. We present a patient who developed a contact dermatitis to lamivudine after prolonged exposure.
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10/97. Occupational contact dermatitis to phaseolus vulgaris in a farmer - a case report.

    A case of occupational contact dermatitis in a farmer is described, caused among others by phaseolus vulgaris. The patient's history of eczematous and vesicular and bullous skin reactions occurring after exposure to phaseolus was confirmed by skin tests with native leaves of the plant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of occupational contact dermatitis caused by leaves of phaseolus plant.
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