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1/3. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from olive oil in a masseur.

    Contact allergy to olive oil is considered rare. There are 20 cases of contact allergy to olive oil described, and 3 of these had an occupational hand eczema as a result of olive oil. We describe a masseur who was allergic to olive oil, resulting in an occupational hand eczema. Both patch tests and a use test with olive oil was undertaken. An oral provocation with olive oil was also performed. Both patch tests were positive, as was the use test after 2 days. The oral provocation test was negative. Despite contact allergy to olive oil being rare, sensitization occurs. The external use of olive oil should be discouraged, at least in masseurs, when used under occlusion, and in long-standing dermatoses.
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2/3. Do latex allergens potentiate other skin tests?

    We report the case of a 33 year old atopic female patient, who worked for the last 4 years as a cleaner in the surgical area of a hospital. One year after starting the work in this area, the patient noticed upper respiratory symptoms and soon later dyspnea immediately after entering the operating room. Other allergic symptoms were perennial rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria after contact with peaches. Common skin prick tests were positive for dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Fifteen min later a skin prick test with latex was done with a strong positive result after 10 min. At the same time, several allergens (cat dander, grass and olive pollens) showed positive results. The patient experienced a fall in the FEV1 that returned to basal levels after two inhalations of a bronchodilator. New skin tests to common allergens performed one week later were only positive to mites.
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3/3. Olive oil--contact sensitizer or irritant?

    Adverse cutaneous reactions to topically applied olive oil are seldom reported, and positive patch tests to it are mostly regarded as allergic. To evaluate such "positive" patch test reactions, 77 female (mean age: 44 years) and 23 male eczema patients (mean age: 46 years) were prospectively patch tested with freshly prepared olive oil. Tests were performed openly (including ROAT) as well as using Al-tests and Finn Chambers on Scanpor. 5 patients (2 male) showed "positive" test reactions (all patients at the Al-test site, 3 at the Finn Chamber site, 1 with ROAT). In only 1 patient could the reaction be classified as probably allergic, in contrast to previous reports. In conclusion, olive oil is very weakly irritant in general, but bears relevant irritant capacity when applied under occlusive conditions. Therefore, olive oil appears to be less than suitable for the topical therapy of patients with venous insufficiency and associated eczema of the lower extremities.
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