Cases reported "Dermatitis, Occupational"

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1/10. Facial orf.

    Orf is an occupational dermatosis caused by a poxvirus that infects sheep or goats. Human transmission typically occurs in people in contact with the infected animals or by handling contaminated animal products such as wool or meat. The infection in humans is classically characterized by a solitary papule on the fingers or hands. Involvement of the face or head has rarely been reported. We report orf in a young woman with multiple nodules on the face.
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2/10. A Japanese case of tinea corporis caused by Arthroderma benhamiae.

    We report a case of tinea corporis in japan caused by Arthroderma benhamiae. A 53-year-old female scientist, who had been working on dermatophytes in a laboratory, noticed pruritic erythema on the outer corner of her left lower eyelid. She used a steroid ointment for three days, but the lesion continued to expand. When she visited our clinic, the erythema was 15 mm in diameter and clearly demarcated with a slightly depressed center. A scale from the periphery of the erythema was positive with direct KOH examination, and T mentagrophytes was isolated from the lesion. The erythema was successfully treated with topical application of butenafine hydrochloride. The isolate was mated with a ( ) strain of the Americano-European race of A. benhamiae. Using the most sensitive molecular typing method, restriction exzyme analysis of the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal dna, the restriction profile of the isolate was the same as that of strains used in her laboratory but different from those of any Japanese isolates associated with pet animals. The results suggest that the patient became infected during her experiment.
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3/10. Airborne allergic contact dermatitis from 3-iodo-2-propynyl-butylcarbamate at a paint factory.

    3-Iodo-2-propynyl-butylcarbamate (IPBC) is a fungicide used in both industrial products and cosmetics. We report the first case of allergic contact dermatitis from airborne exposure to this preservative. A 34-year-old female production worker at a paint factory developed dermatitis on air-exposed skin areas. Patch testing showed a reaction to the preservative IPBC 0.01% in petrolatum. The compound was used as a preservative in wood treatment products manufactured at her work place. Based on animal studies, IPBC is considered safe as a cosmetic preservative. However, widespread use of the chemical might lead to increasing levels of contact allergy, and therefore, close monitoring of IPBC is recommended.
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4/10. Irritant dermatitis from diallylglycol carbonate monomer in the optical industry: clinical and experimental studies of cutaneous tolerance and chemical investigations.

    The diallylglycol carbonate monomer causes dermatitis due to irritation in the optical industry. Cutaneous intolerance may effect as many as 70% of the exposed persons employed. Almost all control subjects who where patch-tested showed irritation at a 2% concentration. The histological effects were an acute oedema with inflammation of the papillary dermis, and diapedesis of neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Experiments on animals confirmed the irritant nature of the product; in the rabbit, a single application produced irritation, but to a lesser degree than in humans. Tests for possible sensitizing effects in the guinea pig have given negative results. Chemical analysis of the monomer revealed the presence of diallyl carbonate and acrolein. Allyl alcohol was detected in only one case. patch tests were carried out in a group of control subjects with acrolein, diallyl carbonate and allyl alcohol. The histological appearance of the lesions caused by acrolein was quite different from that due to diallyglycol carbonate. It is probable that the irritant is the diallylglycol carbonate monomer itself.
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5/10. The sensitizing capacity of Compositae plants. I. Occupational contact dermatitis from arnica longifolia Eaton.

    Three patients with occupational contact dermatitis due to arnica longifolia Eaton and arnica montana L. are reported. During cultivation, harvesting of the flower heads, chemical investigation of the sesquiterpene lactone constituents and preparation of therapeutic tinctures, they had frequent contact with the plant materials. patch tests with the two sesquiterpene lactones carabron and helenalin, isolated during investigation from A. longifolia Eaton, were positive in all three patients, though the second patient had never shown visible allergic reactions of the skin. Sensitization experiments with carabron in five guinea pigs were successful. The investigation results revealed that carabron, helenalin and the acetyl derivative of helenalin must be considered as the sensitizers of A. longifolia, and helenalin acetate and properly arnifolin as sensitizers of A. montana. Studies on cross reactivity in the sensitized animals with six related sesquiterpene lactones showed that only those compounds gave a positive test response which contain an alpha-methylene gamma-lactone group. cross reactions were obtained with a crude extract of chrysanthemum indicum L. The case reports supported by the patch test and investigation results demonstrate that persons handling a new drug from the Compositae family run a risk of developing an allergy after intensive contact with the plant and its constituents.
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6/10. An outbreak of rat mite dermatitis in an animal research facility.

    We describe an outbreak of rat mite dermatitis that affected 15 employees of an animal research facility. Cases of rat mite dermatitis are infrequently reported, and outbreaks are reported even less. Our case series demonstrates that in contrast to most prior outbreaks, rat mite dermatitis may occur even in modern, well-maintained physical surroundings and thus remains a relevant diagnosis today.
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keywords = animal
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7/10. Occupational exposures to pesticides containing organoarsenicals in california.

    The only organic arsenicals used in agriculture are methanearsonic acid (MSMA) and its sodium and ammonium salts and dimethylarsinic acid (cacodylic acid) and its sodium salt. They have an oral LD50 in the rat of 700-1,000 mg/kg and are classified as toxicity category 3 pesticides. During the three-year period 1975, 1976 and 1977 in california there were 34 reports by physicians of injury due to exposure to pesticides containing organic arsenicals of which nine resulted in systemic symptoms and the remainder being eye and skin irritations. There appeared to be prompt recovery from these exposures. They were caused primarily by use of faulty equipment, not using due care in its operation, poor work practices and improper use of protective equipment. There is no evidence that this group of chemicals is carcinogenic in animals or man.
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8/10. Human orf. A diagnostic consideration?

    We saw four unrelated cases of human orf infection over a 3-month period. Each patient had a clear-cut history of contact with sheep and developed a characteristic painful pustular lesion on the hand. There were no significant systemic symptoms. Examination of an aspirate by electron microscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The lesions resolved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Human orf infection occurs in north america, and although seldom reported, it should be considered in the diagnosis of cutaneous lesions in patients who have exposure to animals associated with it.
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9/10. Contact allergy to furazolidone.

    A case of occupational contact allergy to furazolidone, used as an animal feed additive and as an antimicrobial drug in veterinary medicine, is described. The patient did not react to furazolidone 2% pet. Using PEG-400 and alcohol as patch test vehicles resulted in positive patch test reactions. No cross-reactions were observed to other nitrofuran derivatives (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin) or to furfural. The literature on contact allergy to nitrofurans is reviewed.
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10/10. Contact sensitivity to quinidine sulfate from occupational exposure.

    Three workers exposed to quinidine sulfate became sensitized after short exposure times (2-3 months). They were patch test positive to quinidine in different vehicles, but negative to the diastereoisomer quinine. Guinea pig maximization tests demonstrated quinidine and quinine to be grade V allergens according to the classification of Magnusson & Kligman. When challenged for cross reactivity, the animals sensitive to quinine did not react to quinidine. Among the quinidine-sensitive guinea pigs, three of 20 (P greater than 0.05) reacted when challenged with quinine.
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