Cases reported "Dermatitis, Occupational"

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11/109. association of reversible alopecia with occupational topical exposure to common borax-containing solutions.

    boron is widely used in industrial materials, most frequently as the salt borax. Systemic exposure (eg, ingestion) to boron in boric acid been associated with reversible toxic alopecia among other manifestations. There is scant clinical literature on alopecia caused by topical exposure to boron. We observed a series of 3 patients in 2 workplaces who suffered reversible alopecia from cutaneous boron exposure. The scalp alopecia was global in 1 patient and patchy in 2 patients. alopecia was completely reversed by elimination or reduction of exposure to boron-containing materials in all 3 patients. We conclude that occupational topical exposure to boron in solutions may cause reversible alopecia.
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12/109. Fingertip dermatitis in a retail florist.

    prevalence of plant contact dermatitis in retail florists varies with exposure, and the number of reports of contact allergy to cut tulips is rather small. Alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone is better known as the cause of both alstroemeria dermatitis in retail florists and tulip finger in wholesale floral workers who handle the bulbs. Our patient presented with prominent erythema, scaling, and peeling of the skin of the thumb, index, and middle fingers of his right hand. Results of a patch test to alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone were strongly positive, and the patient determined that the exposure had occurred when he stripped leaves from the tulip stems to arrange cut flowers. Other natural sources of the antigen include alstroemeria; Bomarea; dioscorea hispida; Erythronium; Gagea; fritillaria; and at least one species of onion, allium triquetrum.
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13/109. Occupational generalised urticaria and allergic airborne asthma due to anisakis simplex.

    anisakis simplex (AS), a fish and cephalopodes parasite, may cause allergic reactions in humans on eating and/or handling contaminated fish. We present a case of occupational hypersensitivity to AS in a woman employed in a frozen-fish factory. She showed both generalised urticarial rash and asthmatic symptoms after work place exposure. All these symptoms immediately disappeared after work place exposure was ceased. The presence of a positive skin prick test and high specific IgE values confirmed a hypersensitivity to anisakis. This is the first case reported of both occupational generalised urticaria and allergic airborne asthma due to AS in the same patient. We suggest that AS could be an important cause of occupational asthma and/or urticaria in the fish industry.
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14/109. Allergic contact dermatitis due to thiuram exposure from a fungicide.

    A 49-year-old man developed a widespread eczematous eruption following contact with plants sprayed with a fungicide. Patch testing revealed a strong reaction to thiuram mix and several of the individual thiuram mix constituents. The fungicide contained tetramethylthiuram disulphide, a thiuram chemical. Thiurams are widely recognized as a cause of rubber-glove allergy; however, they are also used extensively in fungicides.
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keywords = exposure
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15/109. Allergic contact dermatitis to proparacaine with subsequent cross-sensitization to tetracaine from ophthalmic preparations.

    We report 2 cases of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to proparacaine and tetracaine. Patient 1 is an ophthalmologist with chronic finger pad dermatitis sensitized to the topical anesthetic proparacaine. Despite discontinuance of proparacaine and substitution with a patch test negative agent, tetracaine, his hand dermatitis persisted. Follow up patch testing documented that acquisition of contact allergy to tetracaine as well as thiuram had taken place. Patient 2 had a periocular eczematous dermatitis with ACD to both proparacaine and tetracaine. Cross sensitization between related topical ophthalmologic anesthetics has been suggested to be a rare occurrence. We suggest that allergic sensitization and possible cross-reaction to topical anesthetics in ophthalmologists and ophthalmologic technicians is an occupational hazard. Chronically eczematized skin might result in increased exposure to contact allergens and result in concomitant allergic sensitization. ACD to topical anesthetic agents among ophthalmologists should be recognized as a potential hazard.
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16/109. Occupational contact urticaria and late-phase bronchial asthma caused by compositae pollen in a florist.

    Insect-pollinated members of the plant family Compositae (asteraceae) rarely cause immediate-type hypersensitivity disease; however, this may have quite disabling consequences, which is shown by the case of a 42-year-old female florist. She developed contact urticaria later accompanied by rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma with maximum obstruction occurring some hours after the end of occupational exposure to the causative Compositae pollens of, for example, dandelions, blazing star, golden rod, yarrow, Aster ssp, chrysanthemums, and marguerite. skin testing revealed immediate-type hypersensitivity to several members of the above-mentioned plant family confirmed by demonstration of specific IgE antibodies. Bronchial provocation testing yielded a positive response with all 4 pollen extracts tested. The patient had to give up work in a flower shop, because sufficient avoidance of airborne inhalant exposure was not considered practical.
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ranking = 41.450390442446
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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17/109. Occupational contact dermatitis to textile dyes in airline personnel.

    BACKGROUND: Reports of textile dye allergic contact dermatitis are becoming frequent in the literature. occupational exposure to textile dyes has been reported, but less frequently. OBJECTIVE: To report 2 cases of allergic contact dermatitis to Disperse Blue dyes 106 and 124 occurring in airline personnel. methods: The patients were patch tested to the European or North American standard series, a textile dye series, and 1 patient was tested with pieces of textile from an airplane seat. RESULTS: Patch testing elicited in both patients a 2 reaction to Disperse Blue dyes 106 and 124, and a 1 reaction to paraphenylenediamine in one patient. CONCLUSION: We describe 2 cases of occupational textile dye allergy occurring in airline personnel. Both cases showed the utility of Disperse Blue dyes 106 and 124 to serve as the screening allergens for textile dermatitis. Mandatory uniforms might be an occupational hazard in certain professions.
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18/109. Occupational contact urticaria caused by airborne methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride.

    Acid anhydrides are low-molecular weight chemicals known to cause respiratory irritancy and allergy. skin allergy has on rare occasions been reported. A total of 3 subjects with occupational exposure to methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) from an epoxy resin system were studied to evaluate the nature of their reported skin and nose complaints (work-related anamnesis, specific IgE, contact urticaria examinations, and ambient monitoring). Using a Pharmacia CAP system with a HHPA human serum albumin conjugate, specific IgE antibody was detected in serum from 1 (33.3%) out of the 3 workers. One unsensitized worker displayed nasal pain and rhinorrhea only when loading liquid epoxy resins into the pouring-machine (2.2 mg MHHPA/m3 and 1.2 mg HHPA/m3), probably being an irritant reaction. Two workers had work-related symptoms at relatively low levels of exposure (geometric mean 32-103 microg MHHPA/m3 and 18-59 microg HHPA/m3); one complained of only rhinitis, and the other was sensitized against HHPA and displayed both rhinitis and contact urticaria (the face and neck). The worker's skin symptoms were evidently due to airborne contact, since she had not had any skin contact with liquid epoxy resin or mixtures of MHHPA and HHPA. These urticaria symptoms were confirmed by a 20-min closed patch test for MHHPA, but not by that for HHPA. The causative agent was considered to be MHHPA, although the specific IgE determination to MHHPA was not performed.
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ranking = 41.450390442446
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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19/109. Allergic contact dermatitis following exposure to essential oils.

    Allergic contact dermatitis from the topical use of essential oils is not widely recognized as an occupational hazard. Four cases of allergic contact dermatitis to essential oils occurring in three aromatherapists and one chemist with a particular interest in aromatherapy are described. All presented with predominantly hand dermatitis and demonstrated sensitization to multiple essential oils. One patient developed a recurrence of cutaneous symptoms following ingestion of lemongrass tea. Workers within this industry should be aware of the sensitization potential of these products and the risk of limiting their ability to continue employment.
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20/109. Occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis from 2-aminothiophenol.

    We report a case of occupational airborne contact dermatitis in a chemical technician working in the pharmaceutical industry, following accidental exposure to the vapors of 2-aminothiophenol (an aromatic hydrocarbon used as a chemical intermediate for chemical and biomedical research). Patch testing showed positive reactions to 2-aminothiophenol 0.1% and 0.01% eth. The importance of patch testing with substances used at work to investigate occupational contact dermatitis is stressed.
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