Cases reported "Dermatitis, Occupational"

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1/3. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from olive oil in a masseur.

    Contact allergy to olive oil is considered rare. There are 20 cases of contact allergy to olive oil described, and 3 of these had an occupational hand eczema as a result of olive oil. We describe a masseur who was allergic to olive oil, resulting in an occupational hand eczema. Both patch tests and a use test with olive oil was undertaken. An oral provocation with olive oil was also performed. Both patch tests were positive, as was the use test after 2 days. The oral provocation test was negative. Despite contact allergy to olive oil being rare, sensitization occurs. The external use of olive oil should be discouraged, at least in masseurs, when used under occlusion, and in long-standing dermatoses.
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keywords = olive
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2/3. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to isophorone diamine (IPD) used as an epoxy resin hardener.

    Three patients employed in the manufacture of plastic tennis rackets developed allergic contact dermatitis to isophorone diamine (IPD), an epoxy resin hardener, and concomitantly to epoxy resin. patch tests were positive to IPD at 1, 2 and 5% in olive oil and to IPD at 1, 2 and 5% in ethanol. Investigations were conducted in control subjects to confirm the allergic nature of reactions. A review of the literature about IPD and related compounds is presented.
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keywords = olive
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3/3. Olive oil--contact sensitizer or irritant?

    Adverse cutaneous reactions to topically applied olive oil are seldom reported, and positive patch tests to it are mostly regarded as allergic. To evaluate such "positive" patch test reactions, 77 female (mean age: 44 years) and 23 male eczema patients (mean age: 46 years) were prospectively patch tested with freshly prepared olive oil. Tests were performed openly (including ROAT) as well as using Al-tests and Finn Chambers on Scanpor. 5 patients (2 male) showed "positive" test reactions (all patients at the Al-test site, 3 at the Finn Chamber site, 1 with ROAT). In only 1 patient could the reaction be classified as probably allergic, in contrast to previous reports. In conclusion, olive oil is very weakly irritant in general, but bears relevant irritant capacity when applied under occlusive conditions. Therefore, olive oil appears to be less than suitable for the topical therapy of patients with venous insufficiency and associated eczema of the lower extremities.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = olive
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