Cases reported "Dermatitis"

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1/65. Oestrogen dermatitis.

    A 56-year-old woman presented with a recurrent itchy eruption mainly involving her face and upper trunk for 5 years. The rash flared cyclically 3 days before her menstruation and improved 5-10 days after the onset of her period. Examination revealed erythematous maculopapules, vesicles and crusting mainly on her face and upper trunk. biopsy from a papule revealed spongiotic dermatitis. Intradermal testing with oestrogen was positive. There was marked improvement with tamoxifen. Sensitivity to oestrogen and progesterone is rare in women and the clinical presentation may be similar. Positive intradermal testing is diagnostic. tamoxifen is effective in treating oestrogen sensitivity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
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2/65. Seabather's eruption: report of five cases in southeast region of brazil.

    The authors report five cases of seabather's eruption, a typical dermatitis associated predominantly to the jellyfish Linuche unguiculata (cnidaria), that causes erythematous and pruriginous papules on areas of the skin of bathers covered by swimsuits. The rash is characteristic and the eruption is commom in the Caribbean, florida, mexico and Gulf States of USA. The cases are the first reported in brazil and larvae of the jellyfish are present in the waters where the accidents happened.
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ranking = 6
keywords = eruption
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3/65. Superficial lymphangitis with interface dermatitis occurring shortly after a minor injury: possible involvement of a bacterial infection and contact allergens.

    BACKGROUND: Linear supralymphatic eruptions with epidermal involvement have rarely been reported. OBJECTIVE: A search was made for apparent anatomical reasons and for external factors to explain the unique distribution pattern and clinical course in three cases in which the linear lesions occurred shortly after a minor injury. methods: Efforts to search for its etiology include careful outlining of the localization, bacterial culture from the site of traumatic injury, patch tests, and skin biopsies. RESULTS: Linear lesions developed along superficial lymphatic vessels and the presence of eczematous conditions around the injured sites and isolation of staphylococcus aureus from the site were observed concomitantly. The histopathological findings showed interface dermatitis. CONCLUSION: Our cases provide a unique example of the combined effects of a bacterial infection and contact allergens in the development of the linear supralymphatic eruptions.
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ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
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4/65. Papular-purpuric gloves-and-socks syndrome with bloody bullae.

    Papular-purpuric gloves-and-socks syndrome (PPGSS) is a disease characterized by itchy, painful acral erythema with edema, confluent papules, and purpura in a gloves-and-socks distribution and is associated with fever and mucosal lesions. parvovirus B19 and other viral infections have been proven to be causative agents of this syndrome. Its histological findings have been the non-specific ones of interface dermatitis. Here, we report a case of PPGSS in a 44-year-old man that we believe to be the first such case in japan. He developed, within one day, a painful edematous eruption with confluent papules and purpura on his hands and feet accompanied by high fever. A unique clinical manifestation in this case was multiple bloody bullae on the toes, which have not been previously described. Serological tests were negative for parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, and measles virus.
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ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
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5/65. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is an uncommon cutaneous disorder characterized by exacerbations during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. We describe a 27-year-old woman with a recurrent skin eruption for 3 years. She had no history of exposure to synthetic progesterones. At each menses, the patient developed scaly, erythematous maculopapular lesions over the face. Intradermal skin test reaction to progesterone was positive. progesterone sensitivity was also demonstrated by challenge test with intramuscular progesterone acetate. These features were consistent with the diagnosis of APD. Our patient was treated successfully with conjugated estrogen for 6 months. At one year follow-up, the patient had had no recurrence of facial eruption.
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ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
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6/65. Myelogenous leukemia cutis resembling stasis dermatitis.

    leukemia cutis may clinically mimic many inflammatory dermatoses. A patient with myelodysplastic syndrome presented with an acute eruption of bilateral, lower-extremity, tender, indurated, brown plaques that clinically resembled chronic stasis dermatitis. Histologic study revealed a dermal myeloblastic leukemic infiltrate.
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ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
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7/65. Pet hamsters as a source of rat mite dermatitis.

    Rat mite dermatitis is characterized by pruritic papules in a patient exposed to the tropical rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti. We report a case of a woman with rat mite dermatitis who developed this eruption after exposure to her pet hamster. mites were collected from the hamster and identified as O bacoti. Reported sources of rat mites, as well as avian mites and other mites that bite humans, are reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
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8/65. dermatitis as a presenting sign of cystic fibrosis.

    BACKGROUND--Three percent to 13% of patients with cystic fibrosis present with protein-energy malnutrition that is characterized by hypoproteinemia, edema, and anemia and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Cutaneous manifestations of malnutrition are rare in patients with cystic fibrosis and have been attributed to deficiencies of protein, zinc, and essential fatty acids. OBSERVATIONS--We describe five patients who presented with failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia, edema, and a cutaneous eruption before the onset of pulmonary symptoms and before the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made. The rash had a predilection for the extremities (lower > upper), perineum, and periorificial surfaces. In most cases, erythematous, scaling papules developed by 4 months of age and progressed within 1 to 3 months to extensive, desquamating plaques. alopecia was variable, and mucous membrane or nail involvement was not observed. The rash was associated with malnutrition and resolved in all survivors within 10 days of providing pancreatic enzyme and nutritional supplementation. The pathogenesis of the rash is unclear, but it appears to stem from deficiencies of zinc, protein, and essential fatty acids and may be mediated by alterations in prostaglandin metabolism. CONCLUSIONS--cystic fibrosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of the red, scaly infant, particularly when failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia, and edema are also present. Recognition of rash as a sign of cystic fibrosis complicated by protein-energy malnutrition will allow earlier diagnosis and treatment of these patients and may improve their outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
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9/65. Post-menopausal cyclic eruptions: autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    Two cases of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) are reported. The patients developed a recurrent eruption, primarily on the extremities after receiving oral oestrogen/progesterone replacement for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed in one of the cases who had intradermal progesterone injection producing an early positive reaction. One case required transient prednisolone therapy and both eventually resolved completely. Aetiological postulates are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = eruption
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10/65. Estrogen dermatitis that appeared twice in each menstrual period.

    A 23-year-old woman presented with millet-sized red papules that were scattered over her chest and abdomen. She stated that since the age of 20, she had recurrently suffered from pruritic eruptions that coincided with ovulation and the time prior to menstruation, and that they persisted for a few days before vanishing spontaneously leaving some pigmentation. A skin biopsy specimen revealed spongiotic bullae in the epidermis and marked infiltration of lymphocytes accompanied by some histiocytes and eosinophils in the upper dermis. An intradermal test for conjugated estrogen showed an urticarial reaction that faded in about four hours. Although the test did not strictly meet the criterion (erythema to remain for more than 24 hours for papulovesicular eruptions), it was concluded that the timing of the episodes along with the result of the test suggested that a diagnosis of estrogen dermatitis was highly probable. There have been several reports of this condition since it was first reported as a distinct entity in 1995; but whatever the reasons, the flares were observed only before menstruation in these cases, despite the fact that the serum estrogen levels showed a double-peaked pattern during each menstrual period. This is considered to be a rare case of estrogen dermatitis that flared twice in each menstrual period. Limited improvement was noted in the symptoms even without treatment.
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ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
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